In the wings

October 19, 2014

Wings

“(the wings) the sides of a theatre stage out of view of the audience.”

Oxford Dictionary of English.

Standing in the wings, possibly waiting for our cue to move on stage, enter the scene and perform our part, can be a nerve-racking experience. Will we recall our lines? How will the audience react?

No doubt these and other thoughts will be flying through our mind as the tension builds.

And yet, if we think back to previous occasions in which we stepped successfully into the spotlight, though the fears may have been the same as now we still managed to achieve desired results.

Why we focus on what could go wrong as we stand in the wings can be passed off as ‘being human’. More likely it is a habit we picked up from others. Through such behaviour they are perhaps implying that believing in ourselves, giving our all and unleashing our potential in all we do is somehow wrong.

And if we have taken on board such thinking, it can indeed make time in the wings uncomfortable. If these limiting beliefs do not serve us well, we can of course choose to let go of them.

Trusting our preparation, however, does not mean we should be either arrogant or cocky about our eventual undertaking. Certainly a measure of apprehension keeps us focused. But we do not need to waste energy worrying for the sake of worrying, whether in the wings or elsewhere for that matter.

Thanks for connecting here today, maybe whilst in the wings awaiting to perform centre stage.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Up the ladder

October 16, 2014

Ladder

Climbing up the ladder, be it to reach the summit or merely to get a better view of what lies before us, is a proactive step.

Stephen Covey noted: “Leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.” But provided it is, getting up the ladder is a task requiring effort and agility.

Yet as we progress, rung by rung, we get nearer to our objective. In these instances the rungs could represent the levels of success we achieve as we move up the ladder. Using the experiences of each level, we build momentum to take ourselves higher.

That said, the journey up the ladder might also be viewed as a triumph of achievement over adversity. Little steps taken one after another have permitted us to reach new heights.

Few may appreciate the cost we paid, perhaps in terms of investing in ourselves through studying and self-development, to get us to where we want to be. Not that that need matter to us.

Thanks for reading this brief post today. If you’d like to join the conversation and share your input on the issue of reaching goals, getting up the ladder, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Top dog

October 12, 2014

 

Dog

“Someday, somewhere, in some way, we are top dog for someone.” #bgdtcoaching.

Being top dog need not be seen as being any better than anyone else. Right here, right now we can think of it as the moment we are our full, true self in a situation in which our presence makes a difference positively speaking.

The top dog will be the one providing leadership and inspiration. The top dog may also be supplying solutions, or then again encouraging others to fulfill their own potential.

From another perspective though, without these top dog moments life might come across as rather flat for ourselves and folk around us. And yes, once we have experienced that top dog feeling once we have it in us to repeat it again and again.

Giving our unique qualities someday, somewhere, in some way, we are top dog for someone. Being our best, operating at our full capacity is a way of harnessing our potential. For the sake of taking ourselves beyond the mediocre to the maximum, being top dog is a pretty good method.

If you would like to ‘like’ this post, subscribe to receive future posts via email or leave a comment below, please do so. For now, thanks for being top dog and for being here.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


A closed door

October 9, 2014

A closed door

“Ideas can flow when a closed door is opened with imagination.” #bgdtcoaching.

Looking at obstacles from the perspective of a closed door, with imagination we can put forward three ideas.

Idea #1

We could adopt a simple method for dealing with a closed door: walk away. On occasions the time, energy and overall effort required to deal with certain obstacles may not make the endeavour worth our while. Deciding when to walk, however, needs to be evaluated carefully. We might miss opportunities if we fail to assess things well.

Idea #2

Sometimes obstacles appear before us in an instance. However, experience tells us situations change from time to time, so with a little patience on our part we can wait for a more opportune moment to knock on a closed door. And if we are right in our expectations, the door will be opened.

Idea #3

Look for the key. In a perfect world every door has a key and every obstacle a solution within it. Assessing in detail the problem, we may find the issue less sinister than first believed. Certainly we could organize our resources and set about dealing with what needs to be done, perhaps keeping in mind the old saying “If we do nothing, nothing changes.”

So, three ideas for dealing with a closed door. Undoubtedly more are known to you. If you’d like to share your input, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘A closed door‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Setting our stall

October 5, 2014

Setting our stall

Though some folk could object to the idea of linking our presence to a market stall – no offence is intended to anyone – let’s briefly look at some aspects of setting our stall in the marketplace of life.

Nicely laid out or randomly placed, setting our stall is an extension of how we market our brand. Whether deliberately thought out or unconsciously undertaken, our efforts in this direction speak much about us.

If we see ourselves as a premium brand, crucial elements concerning who we are and what we do will feature prominently as we go about setting our stall. An average outlook would possibly be reflected in a ‘Hit or miss’ approach, whilst a ‘Whatever’ attitude towards ourselves may mean setting our stall is done in a slapdash way.

Time restrictions impede a discussion on how fresh or relevant our offering is. And we can avoid making comparisons between our set stall and that of others. Yet when we are comfortable with how we are living our brand, showcasing our strengths, our efforts in setting our stall will reflect this.

So, as we go about ‘keeping the customer satisfied’ to quote Simon and Garfunkel, thanks for reading this ‘Setting our stall‘ post today.

Best wishes.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Building for tomorrow

October 2, 2014

Building

“Inspired by the greatness of yesterday, we can engage in building for tomorrow today.” #bgdtcoaching.

Being inspired by the greatness of yesterday, be it in the form of architecture, art, intrepid lives or tales of daring deeds, we might choose to unleash our potential and get to work building for tomorrow.

Yet building for tomorrow is a personal issue. We may decide to invest time and effort in enhancing our skills and competitiveness. Possibly now is the moment to enrol in a formal study programme looking to greater opportunities in the future.

Others could feel an informal regime is the way of building for tomorrow for them. Whatever the choices and regardless of the circumstances associated with where we are right now, building for tomorrow is a way of moving us towards our desired objectives.

Delaying the initiative, on the other hand, suggests we are either not yet ready to begin implementing our plan or that we are possibly not fully convinced about our goals. Clarification in such situations may be called for today before building for tomorrow.

Standing here the efforts of yesterday surround me. Being inspired, I’m off to start building for tomorrow.

Thanks for reading this and kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Being wary

September 28, 2014

A cat being wary

“Without mistrusting everyone and everything, at times being wary is appropriate.” #bgdtcoaching.

Though each of us has an element of goodness guiding our actions, being wary on occasions keeps us out of danger and possibly also mischief.

Being wary we might choose to a) look before we leap; b) measure twice and then cut once and c) recall all that glitters is not gold. Clich├ęs yes, but when listened to they invariably save us pain at a later date.

Of course, occasionally being wary works against us. We may feel an intuitive urge to dive into a situation. Then second guess ourselves, hold back and end up missing out on what would have been an opportunity for us had we indeed dived in.

Finding the balance between being wary and being bold is an individual task. Our assessment of the moment can guide us and, hopefully, our intuition will tip the scale one way or another for us. Or perhaps not.

Please feel free to share your input on the topic of being wary by leaving a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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