An iconic view

April 20, 2014

The iconic Royal Albert Hall

“Through our daily performance we are creating an iconic view of who we are.” #bgdtcoaching.

Thinking about an iconic view, we could bring to mind a variety of sights each one symbolic of a city or location: the pyramids of Giza, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Royal Albert Hall in London or the Statue of Liberty in New York, for example.

From another perspective, an iconic view might be considered as a specific way of thinking of a particular person or even company. Richard Branson, Seth Godin and Steve Jobs are each known for having an iconic view of life and business.

Yet daily through our performance we are creating an iconic view of who we are. Words may at times fail us, but our body language and our actions speak loudly for us. Our thinking and intentions are made visible by what we do and together form for others a unique picture, or an iconic view, of us.

Rather than opening the idea out to iconic cultural views and so forth, let me stop now. Thanks for your presence here today. If you would like to share your input on the subject of an iconic view, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Beyond black or white

April 17, 2014

Black and white doorstep

“Our presence embraces the whole spectrum, beyond black or white.” #bgdtcoaching.

The complexity of life is rarely a match for us when we are at our best, performing with the stops out and the wind in our sails to use two clichés.

Our role may involve mundane tasks or activities requiring many years of preparation and training. Whatever we are engaged in, however, the role can connect to our heart and when this happens our presence embraces the whole spectrum, beyond black or white.

Being our best occurs when we go beyond black or white, an all or nothing mentality. How we handle the task we engage in – whether it was chosen by us, thrust upon us or assigned randomly to us – reflects on us.

Notwithstanding the benefits of seeing the person rather than the job, in many instances it is difficult to disassociate ourselves from our work.

Playing small, hiding our potential, for fear of failing or even fear of succeeding in some cases, does a disservice to both ourselves and our role.

Beyond ‘black or white thinking’ lies an opportunity for us to stretch out towards our desired goals and many times actually reach them. Yet we are responsible for our actions and choices are there to be discovered, if we so choose.

Thanks for connecting to this beyond black or white post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Moving ahead

April 13, 2014

Moving walkway

“Sometimes we have to move sideways or backwards before moving ahead.” #bgdtcoaching.

Working to our potential involves learning from errors and trusting ourselves to find the way forward. Our potential has many aspects, however three come immediately to mind: resilience to setbacks, expandability and universality.

Rather than letting frustrations block us from moving ahead with our plans, which would only lead to more frustration, we can trust in the resilience of our potential knowing that sometimes we have to move sideways or backwards before moving ahead. Our direction might have to change, yet our heart always knows the way ahead.

That we are able to expand our potential by learning additional material and develop ourselves in order to confront new challenges is a crucial aspect of our potential. We are not a ‘finished item’ but rather a ‘work in progress’. Actions on our part can take us forward.

Potential is rarely tied to just one instance or setting. We may transfer, as it were, our resources and presence to accommodate each moment. The universality of our potential underpins our ability to cope and prosper when and wherever we are giving our best. And even if on occasions the present time is not the right time, it is the only time for us to set about moving ahead.

Three aspects of potential highlighted here, though many more are also worthy of consideration. To share your input on the issue of potential and moving ahead regardless of difficulties, please leave a comment below.

All the best.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


A to B

April 10, 2014

Old car

“Getting from A to B is a crucial step to reaching C.” #bgdtcoaching.

We all have the potential to evaluate our current situation from the point of view of assessing where we are compared to where we want to be. With awareness we can choose to move forward safe in the knowledge we are on track towards our goal, or make adjustments and then set out on our amended route. Our choices will take us forward from A to B to C.

There may be times we are obliged to move from A to B knowing the ‘why’, but having no necessity to concern ourselves with the ‘how’. Style, speed and the impact we make along the way are of little importance.

Other moments could place emphasis on the journey itself and require us to not only get from A to B, but do it in a style and elegance befitting the endeavour. On such occasions it is not acceptable to ignore the ‘how’.New car

On a wider front, developing soft skills within the workplace and society in general is much about taking others into consideration whilst progressing from A to B. It is an increasingly important aspect of working with one’s potential. Perhaps the days of riding roughshod over everyone else towards selective or individual objectives are gone, or at least on the way out, as collaboration takes root.

Thanks for connecting to this A to B post and kindest regards to you.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Looking out

April 6, 2014

Looking out from a plane

Looking out beyond the immediate requires a pinch of imagination and a dash of open-mindedness.” #bgdtcoaching.

The idea of looking out, figuratively speaking if we are at the initial phase of a project, is very much a case of seeing what could be instead of fixating on what is. One aspect of our potential is the capacity to extrapolate its presence today into the future.

All things being equal, we can broadly trust the skills and competencies we have acquired until now to take us forward. Naturally we should be conscious of the need to remain updated in our chosen field of endeavour. That said, we can indeed engage in looking out beyond the present to see what might be.

And as we ponder the future our intuition will guide us to make decisions based on our strengths to help bring about the desired vision. Without a pinch of imagination and a dash of open-mindedness it is difficult to undertake this looking out exercise, yet when applied the rewards invariably outweigh the cost it may have obliged us to pay.

Looking up from the page, I can see it is time to conclude here. Please don’t hesitate to jump in with a comment about looking out if you so wish.

Thanks for reading this looking out post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


The right choice

April 3, 2014

Beads

The right choice is always known to our heart.” #bgdtcoaching.

At times it may be difficult to maintain the appropriate levels of concentration required for our efforts. Unless we are fortunate enough to be engaged in activities of our choosing, working non-stop at our maximum level is tough.

Regardless of our role, the right choice it would seem is to prioritize undertakings based on when we are most productive. For some this may mean reserving time at the start of the shift for less mind-engaging actions until they are ‘fully awake’. Others may find it better to get the core work ‘out of the way’ immediately, leaving less arduous tasks for when tiredness could impact negatively on precision.

Scheduling the best, or at least the most productive use of our working time, then is a crucial aspect of giving our all to the matter before us. And the right choice of our efforts is a basis upon which our overall performance will sit. If the choices are made well we are setting ourselves up to be as effective as possible and few can deny this is a positive thing for the workplace today.

Thanks for reading this post. Please feel free to like it, leave a comment regarding the right choice or subscribe using the box on the right to receive these posts via e-mail.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Powered by

March 30, 2014

Powered turbine

“Efforts powered by the heart propel us further than those powered by the head.” #bgdtcoaching.

If we are looking for three motivational phrases powered by the heart we could look no further than: “I know you can do it”, “Well done” and “Thank you”. Each of these has the ability to encourage the recipient to continue giving his or her best.

Yet if we stop to consider the issue further, we might be tempted to ask ourselves exactly how many times our expressed words are powered by the heart and impact positively on others throughout a typical day.

Powered by a desire to reach our goals we have within us the capacity to overcome obstacles along the road leading to our chosen objectives. And let’s not forget efforts powered by the heart propel us further than those powered by the head.

Looking at the question from a different perspective, what about actions powered by anger? What indeed about them? We all know how they feel and the hurt they produce to the doer and the receiver.

It is not necessary to dwell on them here, besides perhaps stating the age-old, though still valid, suggestion of counting to ten before doing such things to others or responding to them from others. Responses powered by awareness, coupled if need be with silence and/or the action of stepping back, can go a long way to reducing stress and tension.

As ever, these ideas are set out for the sake of reflection and your thoughts on the issue would surely enhance the conversation. Accordingly, please feel free to leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this powered by post today.

Warmest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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