Being wary

September 28, 2014

A cat being wary

“Without mistrusting everyone and everything, at times being wary is appropriate.” #bgdtcoaching.

Though each of us has an element of goodness guiding our actions, being wary on occasions keeps us out of danger and possibly also mischief.

Being wary we might choose to a) look before we leap; b) measure twice and then cut once and c) recall all that glitters is not gold. Clichés yes, but when listened to they invariably save us pain at a later date.

Of course, occasionally being wary works against us. We may feel an intuitive urge to dive into a situation. Then second guess ourselves, hold back and end up missing out on what would have been an opportunity for us had we indeed dived in.

Finding the balance between being wary and being bold is an individual task. Our assessment of the moment can guide us and, hopefully, our intuition will tip the scale one way or another for us. Or perhaps not.

Please feel free to share your input on the topic of being wary by leaving a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Collecting experience

September 25, 2014

Collection

“Each moment lived is an example of collecting experience.” #bgdtcoaching.

Regardless of how life has been to date – filled with some highs, some lows and many moments in between possibly – we have been collecting experience regarding what it is to be alive. Maybe we haven’t actually stopped along the way to categorize the input, yet we have surely taken it all in.

Noting thoughts, feelings and sensations right now, we can continue collecting experience. Being mindful of our body, our mind, and our breathing if we so choose, gives us an insight on how we are living this exact minute.

Taking the idea of collecting experience further, what are we actually going to do with it all once gathered? It is a question sooner or later each of us might ask ourselves?

And the answer will reflect the uniqueness of the individual. There are few easy answers ready to be applied to everyone. Collecting experience is a personal issue and so is whatever we decide to do with it.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Collecting experience‘ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reading the moment

September 21, 2014

Reading books

Reading the moment requires our heart as well as our eyes.” #bgdtcoaching.

Without engaging our heart, the task of reading the moment is made more difficult than it already is. Taking the pulse of the situation, though not easy, can provide us with valuable input as we make our way through the moment.

We might not have the time to undertake a full-blown analysis, complete with a survey and focus group input. Yet just stepping back from the ongoing activities and reflecting quietly gives us a panoramic view of the present situation.

For a deeper level of understanding, reading the moment inevitably begins with a desire to gain perception, and a few minutes of calm are crucial to the process. So, right now what is your heart telling you about today?

Reading the moment, what does it tell you about tomorrow? What else? With the details in place, what will you do differently from now onwards to bring about a bright future?

Reading the moment now I notice it is time to draw this post to close. As ever, if you’d like to share your input by leaving a comment below, subscribe using the box on the right to receive future posts as emails or like this post, please feel free to do so.

Thanks in any case for connecting with this ‘Reading the moment‘ post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Flying the flag

September 18, 2014

Flags

Before you start to think I have gotten all patriotic and am suggesting we should be flying the flag of our various countries, let me quickly quash that idea immediately. Others may choose to do such a thing and, within a sporting context for example, it can bring people together.

But what about flying the flag of kindness? Can we imagine how things could be under such a flag? Personal interests merge with those of neighbours. Each of us having, being and doing things from a perspective of if not helping, at least not harming others.

And what about flying the flag of peace? What would it be like to do away with national borders – rather than having wars over them? No passports, no restrictions on the movement of the world’s inhabitants…

Crazy, ridiculous, what about criminality? Actually it is pretty much unaffected by queues at airports, border controls and the like already, no? And the money saved could be assigned to universal healthcare, education and, flying the flag for our one world, environmentally friendly alternative energy.

Ramblings, ideas thrown out for the sake of provocation. No, not really. Just a thought that flying the flag of the world for a change may create a ripple somehow, sometime, in someone’s heart.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Down the road

September 14, 2014

Road

Down the road the way looks different. Perhaps it is, maybe it isn’t. Yet if we are curious, then we need to pluck up our courage and head on down the road.

Naturally not every path needs to be followed. Some streets might even best be avoided. But to get to where we want to go, nothing less than taking a step and moving down the road can get us there.

Down the road our goals await us. Wanting to be there is an aspect of eventually reaching that desired destination. Pondering and reflecting on how it will be once there likewise plays a part. However, to be there we have to do something more, yes walk down the road.

So, no more words, let the movement commence. Looking forward to seeing you down the road, though in the meantime thanks for being here today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


A cheery face

September 11, 2014

A cheery face

A cheery face reflects a smile in the heart.” #bgdtcoaching.

A cheery face, a warm greeting, perhaps even a welcoming handshake. Such things set a positive tone for any meeting or gathering. Smiling at life we could say.

Whilst it is probable we spend hours getting the preparation right, thinking about location, lay-out, handouts and the like, a cheery face at the entrance costs nothing but has a great impact.

Extending the idea further, perhaps not going as far as the supermarket greeter – though when done right it can be impressive, no? – a ‘meeter and greeter’ in any retail or customer-encountering environment is a way of humanizing the experience.

Yes, it adds a dimension of interaction rarely seen nowadays in the age of online shopping. Or maybe a stepping up of customer service if we consider the sourly faces and/or phone distracted shop assistants standing around bored to tears so typical in many instances. Oh for a cheery face!

With a cheery face and a big thank you for connecting here today, let me stop now. However, if you’d like to share your thoughts on the question of a cheery face, please do so by leaving a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Communicating successfully

September 7, 2014

Mailboxes

Communicating successfully is as much a question of medium as message.” #bgdtcoaching.

Communicating successfully is undoubtedly an art as well as a science. The basics are most likely clear to all. Indeed given the extent many folk live in constant connection with others, communicating successfully is possibly not even an objective, but rather a fact.

Yet communicating successfully presupposes we have something worth communicating. Also that we have taken the recipients’ needs into consideration when putting together the message, in addition to pondering the medium for its effective transmission.

However, junk filled letterboxes and email accounts full of spam suggest not all communication efforts are valid. That said, looking around us now we can most likely note a number of communication tools to hand, all ensuring we are in touch with the world.

In terms of communicating successfully, that you are here today means something has functioned. If you’d like to join the conversation on the question of communicating successfully, please leave a comment below.

Best wishes to you.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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