Shattered dream

October 30, 2014

Shattered window

“A shattered dream could be a sign of a concrete goal being present.” #bgdtcoaching.

Thinking about a shattered dream may seem very negative, lacking in optimism. It is that if we stop at first impressions. Anything broken is often viewed as being worthless, unable to be deemed as possessing value at all.

Yet from another perspective, a shattered dream could be a sign of a concrete goal being present. We might consider a dream as an imaginary thing, a concept alive only in our mind or heart. And we smash it by creating a specific goal, one capable of motivating us to reach our objective.

Once the shattered dream is out of the way we can turn to focusing on the goal it has been replaced by. As the saying goes: ” A goal is a dream with a plan attached to it.” And as we follow a plan leading us to our desired destination, momentum will surely take us forward.

A shattered dream yes, broken optimism no.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Eating locally whilst thinking globally

October 26, 2014

Tigelle

Appreciating the delights of our present location, in this instance home-made tigelle, as we enjoy connectivity with the world is a simple example of eating locally whilst thinking globally.

Regardless of where we find ourselves, it is likely there is a wealth of specialities to sample. Eating locally, besides keeping our carbon footprint to a minimum, is another way of connecting globally as we experience the vastness and abundance of the world.

Variations of traditional cuisine, prepared locally in family settings, are often found nowadays in international restaurants throughout the world. Eating locally whilst thinking globally in this way is possibly the same thing.

Moving to the area of work, eating locally whilst thinking globally could refer to the activities designed to build a solid sales base in the home market, as we go about implementing growth strategies to extend our presence beyond our borders.

However we decide to interpret the issue of eating locally whilst thinking globally, thanks for connecting here today. Please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below if you wish to share your thoughts on the question of eating locally whilst thinking globally.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Feeling cramped

October 23, 2014

Outdoors

“If the moment is restrictive, we can experience feeling cramped even outdoors.” #bgdtcoaching.

When feeling cramped, hemmed in, restricted in some manner, it might be difficult to appreciate all that life offers us. Maybe the stress of ‘running to keep still’, or ‘pushing just to resist’ is sapping us of our normal positive outlook.

Though such moments occur to us all from time to time, they are never easy to manage. However, we need not forget about all the great things that are still part of our life. Indeed life offers us much, even if we lose sight of this on occasions because we are feeling cramped.

Yet it takes little effort to mentally list the said great things. Remembering to do so, unfortunately, is another matter. So, right now, whilst I hope the moment is good and that you are not feeling cramped, why not practice recalling what life is offering you today?

Being present, whether feeling cramped or not, keeps us conscious this moment now will pass just as all the others have to date. Thanks for having chosen to spend time here. If you’d like to share your thoughts on the question of feeling cramped, please leave a comment below.

Best wishes to you.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


In the wings

October 19, 2014

Wings

“(the wings) the sides of a theatre stage out of view of the audience.”

Oxford Dictionary of English.

Standing in the wings, possibly waiting for our cue to move on stage, enter the scene and perform our part, can be a nerve-racking experience. Will we recall our lines? How will the audience react?

No doubt these and other thoughts will be flying through our mind as the tension builds.

And yet, if we think back to previous occasions in which we stepped successfully into the spotlight, though the fears may have been the same as now we still managed to achieve desired results.

Why we focus on what could go wrong as we stand in the wings can be passed off as ‘being human’. More likely it is a habit we picked up from others. Through such behaviour they are perhaps implying that believing in ourselves, giving our all and unleashing our potential in all we do is somehow wrong.

And if we have taken on board such thinking, it can indeed make time in the wings uncomfortable. If these limiting beliefs do not serve us well, we can of course choose to let go of them.

Trusting our preparation, however, does not mean we should be either arrogant or cocky about our eventual undertaking. Certainly a measure of apprehension keeps us focused. But we do not need to waste energy worrying for the sake of worrying, whether in the wings or elsewhere for that matter.

Thanks for connecting here today, maybe whilst in the wings awaiting to perform centre stage.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Up the ladder

October 16, 2014

Ladder

Climbing up the ladder, be it to reach the summit or merely to get a better view of what lies before us, is a proactive step.

Stephen Covey noted: “Leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.” But provided it is, getting up the ladder is a task requiring effort and agility.

Yet as we progress, rung by rung, we get nearer to our objective. In these instances the rungs could represent the levels of success we achieve as we move up the ladder. Using the experiences of each level, we build momentum to take ourselves higher.

That said, the journey up the ladder might also be viewed as a triumph of achievement over adversity. Little steps taken one after another have permitted us to reach new heights.

Few may appreciate the cost we paid, perhaps in terms of investing in ourselves through studying and self-development, to get us to where we want to be. Not that that need matter to us.

Thanks for reading this brief post today. If you’d like to join the conversation and share your input on the issue of reaching goals, getting up the ladder, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Top dog

October 12, 2014

 

Dog

“Someday, somewhere, in some way, we are top dog for someone.” #bgdtcoaching.

Being top dog need not be seen as being any better than anyone else. Right here, right now we can think of it as the moment we are our full, true self in a situation in which our presence makes a difference positively speaking.

The top dog will be the one providing leadership and inspiration. The top dog may also be supplying solutions, or then again encouraging others to fulfill their own potential.

From another perspective though, without these top dog moments life might come across as rather flat for ourselves and folk around us. And yes, once we have experienced that top dog feeling once we have it in us to repeat it again and again.

Giving our unique qualities someday, somewhere, in some way, we are top dog for someone. Being our best, operating at our full capacity is a way of harnessing our potential. For the sake of taking ourselves beyond the mediocre to the maximum, being top dog is a pretty good method.

If you would like to ‘like’ this post, subscribe to receive future posts via email or leave a comment below, please do so. For now, thanks for being top dog and for being here.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


A closed door

October 9, 2014

A closed door

“Ideas can flow when a closed door is opened with imagination.” #bgdtcoaching.

Looking at obstacles from the perspective of a closed door, with imagination we can put forward three ideas.

Idea #1

We could adopt a simple method for dealing with a closed door: walk away. On occasions the time, energy and overall effort required to deal with certain obstacles may not make the endeavour worth our while. Deciding when to walk, however, needs to be evaluated carefully. We might miss opportunities if we fail to assess things well.

Idea #2

Sometimes obstacles appear before us in an instance. However, experience tells us situations change from time to time, so with a little patience on our part we can wait for a more opportune moment to knock on a closed door. And if we are right in our expectations, the door will be opened.

Idea #3

Look for the key. In a perfect world every door has a key and every obstacle a solution within it. Assessing in detail the problem, we may find the issue less sinister than first believed. Certainly we could organize our resources and set about dealing with what needs to be done, perhaps keeping in mind the old saying “If we do nothing, nothing changes.”

So, three ideas for dealing with a closed door. Undoubtedly more are known to you. If you’d like to share your input, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘A closed door‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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