Setting the stall

May 5, 2016

Man setting the stall

A key element of our eventual work is implemented at the preliminary stage, here entitled ‘setting the stage‘.

Once the basics are in place – specific to each task we are required to undertake – we will need to possibly arrange props, test electrical equipment and generally go about setting the stall as it were. To feel comfortable and confident with our surroundings, when we have the opportunity to do it, it is worth taking the time to complete this performance phase.

Setting the stage ourselves is a moment for us to renew our acquaintance with material as we prepare ourselves and the location for the raising of the proverbial curtain. Showtime invariably puts us in the spotlight and brings with it its own momentum.

Once our work is under way the effort we gave to setting the stall will hopefully be repaid with a seamless performance.

A small, but not necessarily insignificant, point concerning setting the stall is associated with the question of when to stop preparing. Appreciating perfection is rather tough to achieve, we are obliged through time restraints and other such factors to at some point ‘get started’.

Indeed, no amount of setting the stall will compensate for us not putting the preparation into practice sooner or later.

To join the conversation here about ‘Setting the stall‘, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Appreciating nature

May 1, 2016

Flowers

Taking our stakeholders’ feedback as a potential source of learning for future endeavours is perhaps akin to appreciating nature.

The variety of fauna and flora could represent the spread of opinions regarding the successful, or otherwise, execution of our work. We cannot expect everyone to be completely satisfied no matter how well we perform our duties.

Appreciation of our offering remains under the control of the individual concerned. Factors beyond our control many times play a part in creating an impression on those forming our audience. Appreciating nature, taking on board all the input made available post-performance will assist us in improving future efforts.

Just as by appreciating nature we include also thorns on roses and weeds among the flowers, the words of those witnessing or experiencing our efforts need to be graded. Feedback from experts or particularly trusted stakeholders will possibly be given greater weighting than casual observers or non-strategic participants of our performance.

However, creative and ‘out-of-the-box’ solutions sometimes arrive from unexpected sources. Accordingly, nothing should be dismissed before fair evaluation is made.

Appreciating nature, listening to feedback and giving consideration to what we can learn from all is itself an exercise of excellence.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Point of reference

April 28, 2016

Building as a point of reference

As a point of reference when travelling in a city not our own, we may refer to a famous building or an element of geographical importance such as a river. In terms of a point of reference for our work, it might be valid to consider one of the following items.

1) The objective
Knowing the intended objective of our activity gives structure to our eventual actions and helps ensure we focus efforts in the right direction.

2) The audience
Leading on from the objective, knowing our audience offers us information useful for how we pitch our work. Choosing an appropriate style of delivery is, also, related to this point of reference.

3) Location and timing
For us to perform at our best it is in many instances helpful to be able to adapt our offering to the location and indeed the time of the day, in addition to the amount of time at our disposition.

Perhaps you can think of another point of reference to be added here. If so, please feel free to share your input by leaving a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘Point of reference‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Clarity through the clouds

April 24, 2016

Clarity through the clouds

Seeking clarity through the clouds of uncertainly is an action we probably all engage in from time to time. That we attempt to find clarity through the clouds is perhaps testimony to our belief in its existence. After all, it would be pointless to set about searching for clarity though the clouds without thinking it is there.

Yet once we begin our efforts in discovering clarity through the clouds, the question arises as to what we will do with it when we have found it.

For some people it might mean a confirmation of initial thoughts. Getting proof keeps us on track to achieving our goals, notwithstanding obstacles and the like. For others, the action of looking is itself a satisfying one and each step forward brings new awareness in its own fashion.

Whatever works best for us is, as ever, the optimum way ahead. And momentum builds as we go about focusing attention and effort on taking responsibility for our actions.

On the other hand, waiting for the bright light of understanding to arrive ‘out of the blue’ could be just another form of procrastination at times. To be fair though, on occasions, clarity through the clouds is actually encountered in the silence and energy of doing nothing but breathing.

Without wanting this post to drag on and on, let me stop now. However, if you feel coaching can be beneficial to gaining clarity through the clouds of current confusion, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Facing forward

April 21, 2016

Building facing forward

By facing forward we might be said to be facing challenges square on. Yet our approach to handling issues varies according to any number of factors including our outlook, our interest in the matter and the wishes of our ‘significant others’.

However, by a) accepting the need to do something and b) doing whatever we perceive as the necessary input, we are taking responsibility for our situation as we go about facing forward. Ideally we will be successful, but this cannot, of course, be guaranteed in all cases.

From the point of view of doing our best, facing forward with our full being offers us the possibility to bring our potential into play.

So often many people appear to just let each moment drift through their field of attention, without applying any effort to interact proactively for the sake of getting the best out of the situation. The results of this way of existing can be found all around us in the form of frustration, tension and a lack of concern for others.

Facing forward may not always be the right response to the moment however, especially when a step back to possibly view the bigger picture would be beneficial. It is for us to apply our experience and intuition to each instance, trusting our eventual efforts are victorious.

Thanks for connecting here today and please feel free to leave a comment below regarding this ‘Facing forward‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Marching ahead

April 17, 2016

Band marching ahead

The sensation of being left behind, stuck in the same old routine, is never pleasant especially as we see others supposedly marching ahead.

One of the problems with our assessment at such times, however, is that we rarely have access to all of the facts. Few of us are able to fully know exactly what is going on in the life of another person. As a result of not being in possession of the complete picture, we could easily invent all sorts of scenarios based on conjecture.

These ideas often put an emphasis on how wonderful, brilliant, excitingly creative, and so forth the people marching ahead are, while putting ourselves down. Why we should be so hard on ourselves is invariably passed off by way of a smearing judgement, “We are not as good/clever/attractive/lucky as them.”

Unfortunately this kind of unfair thinking fails to see our own successes, of which there are surely many, yet overplays the marching ahead of the rest.

Looking more carefully at the ‘progress’ our contemporaries are making, we may even recognize the truth behind the glamorous marching ahead. Hard work, overcoming adversities, facing down setbacks and marching ahead despite numerous other difficulties have been part of their makeup.

Seeing the preparation behind those marching ahead does not mean we should dismiss in any way their achievements, but rather help us to understand better how we can go about reaching our goals too.

Whatever way we wish to look at things, marching ahead is most likely at the heart of many of our activities. For now, thanks for connecting here as you, possibly, go about marching ahead today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Similar but different

April 14, 2016

Similar but different houses

Similar but different is perhaps a way to define the uniqueness of us all.” #bgdtcoaching.

Progress in any field of work is without doubt a question of personal development put into practice to achieve maximum potential. Our individuality gives each input a twist as we interpret, amend and embrace the learning for the sake of moving forward in our desired career endeavour.

Similar but different‘ may be the informal title we apply to the offering covered by the general heading of ‘Customer facing service’. On each interaction with stakeholders we have the opportunity to employ our best efforts to get the task done well.

From a wider perspective, the variety of life experiences ensures each of us has similar but different interactions throughout the week. Our attitudes and outlook also influence how we live the moment, regardless of the setting or situation.

Our reactions to events likewise can be similar but different, depending again on our approach to things as well as our attachment to the matters in question, although this is not always easy to put into words for others.

Furthermore, ‘similar but different‘ is a catch-all summary to explain our preferences in the various areas of work and life, particularly when dealing with non-essential matters. A blue or a black pen? This sandwich bar or that one? To be fair, it doesn’t really change anything under most circumstances.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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