Pull up a chair

July 5, 2015

 

Pulling chairs

Pull up a chair, get comfortable, enjoy a moment of peace and quiet.” #bgdtcoaching.

Symbolically speaking, the suggestion to pull up a chair may create the idea of an impromptu get together. The informality of the activity leads to exchanging information and working collaboratively for the sake of achieving a shared goal.

It could be the case it is not necessary to pull up a chair. Some contributions are more forthcoming when meetings are conducted standing up. On the other hand, it is wise to pull up a chair and be prepared to sit for a while if the discussion is set to last and last and last.

There are, of course, many things worse than spending long periods of the day seated uncomfortably. Yet when we can avoid suffering it seems sensible to do so. And others might appreciate our efforts and think twice before convening such meetings again.

Regardless of the where’s and why’s, right now should you be of a mind to pull up a chair and spend some time reading a few of the archive posts here don’t forget to grab a coffee first!

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Looking through

July 2, 2015

 

Looking through a fence

Looking through our thoughts we can see the world before us.” #bgdtcoaching.

Our thoughts are like filters over our eyes. And those we are looking through right now not only colour our vision of the moment, but impact on how we see the world around us.

We could have placed before our eyes only negative ideas. Looking through them gives us little hope for a brighter tomorrow, let alone a pleasant life this present instance.

Looking through neutral perceptions of the actual reality, we might see things in a varied manner. Some things shine bright whilst other aspects of the day are less than great for us. All is as it is we feel without the necessity to make a further assessment right now.

A third option exists and we may wish to take it up. Looking through positive thoughts gives us the impression of a joyful scene in which opportunities possibly abound. And that it is our thoughts creating the vision suggests we are capable of bringing into being some, if not all, of the items.

Being curious, which filter are you currently looking through? Maybe your view of the present is influenced by factors not referred to here. In any case, if you’d like to share your input, please leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this Looking through post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Packing up

June 28, 2015

 

Packing up

Getting things together, sorting what needs sorting and packing up everything is a way of moving forward for some people. Packing up goods no longer required can be liberating.

Rather than actually letting go of these items – something probably actually worth considering in many instances – packing up the things and putting them away lessens some of the resistance and upset associated with moments of change.

Packing up might also be applied to intangible objects. We may choose to ponder packing up certain habits, smoking coming first to mind. Yet as a non-smoker all I would say here is that if some folk have managed to give up the habit it’s likely others too have the capacity, no?

Taking greater control of how we use our time could mean packing up, or at least reducing, time spent on activities keeping us from working on our heartfelt goals. As I wrote some time ago on Twitter (@bgdtcoaching), “It is not true others have more time than us, they just use it differently.”

Anyway, before packing up here today, let me thank you for reading this post. To join the conversation, please feel free to leave a comment below. If you’d like to discuss the idea of packing up habits as part of a coaching conversation, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Picture this

June 25, 2015

 

Picture of icicles

“If you can picture this – a day in December. Picture this – freezing cold weather.” Blondie.

Picture this, a scene of tranquillity, possibly one in which the surroundings are a reflection of our inner peace and outer calmness. Of course it could be right now you are already living in such a reality and my invitation to see this vision of life merely requires a lifting of the eyes.

Alternatively the scene described above might be a million miles from that of the moment for you. Yet you can picture this too, in this case by closing your eyes and looking into your heart.

For some people peacefulness is also found in the middle of what others would consider chaos. They may choose to picture this idea of energy and movement not in a negative or off-putting manner, but in one embracing the excitement of life experienced to the full.

The richness of variety never fails to shine bright it seems. How we decide to picture this moment contains our vision of where we are now, together with the sum of our emotions, sensations and overriding thoughts in this instance.

As with life itself, time flows and as we picture this now we are already in the process of discovering the next and then the one after that and so on. Endless moments making up our day.

So, if perhaps we decide this picture is not of our liking, let’s not fret too much as in the time it takes to read this Picture this post a new one is before us.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Creating a stir

June 21, 2015

 

Fireworks creating a stir

“In some small way, somewhere, somehow we are creating a stir.” #bgdtcoaching.

Creating a stir could be read from various perspectives. For now, let’s look at two.

Firstly, we might like to consider the idea of creating a stir by the positive contribution we can offer to those around us. I’m focusing on the positive as I am sure some have already highlighted, or at least underlined, our occasional negative impact – in their opinion of course.

We are creating a stir when we spend quality time with others. Even if we are all ‘Oh so busy’, taking time to let people be themselves is a way of acknowledging their presence in our life. And let’s not forget how kindness spreads through a smile, especially when a frown is expected from us.

The second perspective concerning creating a stir relates to changing the status quo of our life. There are few reasons for us not to drink a coffee in a different location occasionally, for example. Choosing to walk rather than jump automatically into the car is likewise an opportunity for us to embrace new aspects of life.

Believing life is a static concept offering us little scope for personal input is a choice we have. On the other hand, by pushing ourselves just a little bit beyond this thinking we are able to live life fully. At such times it is fair to think in some small way, somewhere, somehow we are creating a stir.

So, two perspectives, perhaps creating a stir in you. To share your input on the issue of creating a stir, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Gateway

June 18, 2015

Gateway

Each moment could be considered a gateway to a desired tomorrow. On the outside nothing may change as we move though the proverbial gateway. Despite taking a few steps in a particular direction, the physical environment will remain similar to that at the point of departure.

Yet it is our attitude and overall mindset that creates the possibility for us to use the gateway as a new beginning. Deciding to move forward takes determination at times. The gateway might seem to be not only a beginning, but also an ending of a phase of life which has become comfortable without perhaps actually being liked.

Passing through the gateway means getting accustomed to a different reality, one with the potential to be better although in the first instance such optimism is not always easy to muster. Knowing why we are seeking to achieve progress in whatever area of life we are referring to aids our efforts.

The upset caused by us moving out of our comfort zone will, it is trusted, be compensated by us fulfilling our objective beyond the gateway. That there is the chance of this being so indeed makes the action worth undertaking, no? Staying where we are, at best, leads to more of the same if we are lucky. Standing still though can also be described as stagnating, however.

Bringing this ‘Gateway‘ post to a close, let me thank you for being here today. If you’d like to leave a comment regarding the idea of a gateway, please feel free to do so.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Space before us

June 14, 2015

 

Space before us

“With space before us we have the room to move towards our goal.” #bgdtcoaching.

Feeling crowded out is rarely a pleasant experience (click here to read the related post). On the other hand, some people might feel apprehensive about having space in front of them. The sense of openness and opportunities are not always favourable to everyone.

Yet for those of us who are not intimidated, with space before us we have the room to move towards our goal. How we choose to firstly see the space before us and secondly eventually fill it is, of course, up to us.

The significance of the perceived way ahead is such an individual matter it would not be correct to offer suggestions here, besides the usual ‘Follow your heart’. With an objective in mind it is likely we decide to use the opportunity offered to us in this instance as a starting point to success.

The space before us in this manner becomes the gap between us and our goal. Closing this gap is a key action, though one we may choose to undertake again in accordance with our values and guiding outlook on life. And from these will flow our effort to manage, to the best of our ability, the space before us.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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