Embracing the present

May 29, 2016

Lake embracing the present

Rather than embracing the present, it can be pleasant at times to engage in a spot of day-dreaming. Connecting with the memories of the past or hopes for the future adds colour to the picture we get to paint of our life.

Yet whilst drifting off perhaps stretches the limits of our existence, embracing the present gives us the opportunity to be our true self. It is here we live fully in the moment in which actions occur.

No matter how we interact with time, right now is the arena for everything we do and this in itself plays into the mindset of embracing the present. And if we have wandered off anew, a noise, a thought, an ache or an idea may contain the power to sharpen our attention, bringing us back to this instance.

To the extent everyone is aware of his or her own relationship with time, are you swimming in thoughts concerning yesterday or tomorrow, or are you embracing the present? Whatever your answer, thanks for reading this ‘Embracing the present‘ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Work is work

May 26, 2016

Man at work sign

Setting aside issues regarding pay, hours and general conditions of employment – valid points worthy of consideration nonetheless – we could ponder whether work is work when we are engaged in an activity we love doing.

Is it fair to say work is work as we go about researching some information if data gathering provides a stimulating challenge to us? Being up to our knees in brambles as we clear the garden for a loved one, yet feeling so alive, doesn’t seem right labelled as ‘work’.

The enjoyment we obtain from a variety of roles possibly gives to the idea of work is work a new perspective. Our attitude to whatever it is we are dealing with right now, in terms of how we are spending the working day, perhaps holds the key to how we perceive the task in question.

Work is work, yes, but we need not fall into the negative mindset of others and automatically dismiss this time of our life as being just a moment to ‘get through’. We can choose to embrace it and, in doing so, might find we are happy wherever we are and however we are using time.

I’d love to learn your thoughts on the issue of ‘work is work‘, so please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Squeezing through

May 22, 2016

Squeezing through narrow street

That we all want to be our best in all we do is a given, so squeezing through challenges is not something we likely contemplate often. We aim at all times to ‘reach the stars’, ‘win hands down’ and ‘claim the jackpot’.

Yet in a quiet moment of reflection, perhaps right here right now, we can be honest with ourselves and acknowledge we are squeezing through on some fronts despite our swagger and bluster.

Just because we may find some things harder to take on board than others – our strengths and weaknesses are surely not exactly the same as anyone else’s – should not mean we think any less of ourselves. Squeezing through at one time or another is part of being human.

Over the course of a lifetime we will triumph, fall down and go about squeezing through in the face of difficulties. The reaction we give to our results many times determines how we eventually look back on the moment.

Choosing to take learning from every situation is, as ever, an option we have. Whether we take it up or not remains a personal matter for us all. For now, let me thank you for reading this ‘Squeezing through‘ post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Dining out

May 19, 2016

Table set for dining out

Having invested time, energy and possibly even financial resources in developing ourselves to where we are, perhaps now is the time to engage in the traditional habit of celebrating success by dining out with colleagues, friends and/or family.

Dining out, it should be said, could actually be substituted with any number of alternative ways of marking the moment. We might choose to acknowledge the effort made in a quiet fashion, especially if the process is not yet over.

Indeed in the areas of personal and professional development, it is invariably better for us to be open to ongoing learning opportunities surrounding us, rather than fall into the trap of thinking we know everything then discovering at an inopportune time it is not so.

Returning to the staring idea of dining out, our choice of venue for the occasion can also be insightful to us. Is our preferred location one associated with fine food, a pleasant environment or something else impacting on our selection? Are we looking to impress our guests or merely aiming to enjoy the meal?

Pondering the answers to these questions will undoubtedly make the eventual experience of dining out more satisfying for all concerned.

If you’d like to share your thoughts on the issues set out here regarding dining out, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Boat load of

May 15, 2016

Boat load of flowers

With a boat load of time options are expanded. With a boat load of options efforts can be effective.

Yet how do we go about generating that initial boat load of time? Respecting the priorities and commitments of everyone here, the following general ideas might be of some value right now.

A simple way to create free time is to up our awareness of the value of our time. The use we give to the day impacts not only on how we live it, but also on our experience of life tomorrow. By respecting each moment we most likely begin to prioritize actions for the sake of achieving more key objectives.

Prioritizing invariably also leads to a better understanding of options available. Seeing how each item fits into the so-called ‘grand scheme’ of things gives us a wider perspective if compared to when we ‘flit from this to that’. Our boat load of time as such becomes a valuable resource to use as necessary.

Freeing up time is not just about scheduling tasks however. We may choose to drop certain activities if they are no longer serving our life purpose. Small changes in habits have the knock-on effect of building a new way of being and, again, this could be viewed as being part of our resources.

Furthermore, we have the freedom to implement changes to more specific items such as social media usage, television watching and the time spent at the coffee vending machine at work. Managing input in these areas possibly provides us with a boat load of time for more strategic activities.

Or maybe not. As ever, it is for us to evaluate how best we use our boat load of time and live our life.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Standing strong

May 12, 2016

Castle standing strong

When tested by adversity, standing strong is at times a valid option for us to consider. Trusting our intuition, and believing in our abilities, we might wish to face difficulties head on.

By drawing on the inspiration of either successful points of reference in our field of work, or possibly an inspiring building known to us, we can adopt behaviour akin to standing strong.

In many instances by deciding not to flee we will discover a seemingly impossible obstacle is actually a minor hiccup and not capable of slowing our progress towards heartfelt goals.

What at first appeared as a mountain is in fact a molehill. Standing strong gives us the perspective of a fuller vision of the moment. From this we are able to manage to the best of our ability whatever truly needs to be dealt with.

Other options besides standing strong could revolve around letting go of the struggle before we get too ensnared in it.

Choosing when to deal with a challenge is not always a choice available to us, yet when it is we need to evaluate also the idea of waiting for the best moment for us. Few problems are so urgent to justify a panicked response from us.

To share your thoughts on the notion of dealing with challenges by standing strong, feel free to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Centre of the moment

May 8, 2016

Duck in the centre of the moment

With the spotlight on and our role calling us to perform, we are truly at the centre of the moment.

It could be we operate on no fixed or specific stage. Accordingly, we are at theĀ centre of the moment at all times as our work represents us on an ongoing basis.

If we are actually required to perform – like a duck in the pond – at only one location, there will be no confusion regarding where and when we are at the centre of the moment.

The answer is to be found in the location of yesterday’s endeavour as well as that of today. To understand where we will be at the centre of the moment tomorrow we need to wait until then, however.

Referring again to our duck in the pond, it finds itself at theĀ centre of the moment captured in the photo for eternity. Whether it is happy to be there is not for us to say, yet it is probably better to have been shot with the camera than with a gun no doubt.

Moving away from such existential consideration, back to the centre of the moment, we might wish to keep in mind our performance lasts beyond the actual time on stage.

Those moments prior to starting, and indeed also those minutes afterwards as we remain in the vicinity of our work, represent time someone can be assessing us and so it is crucial we remain conscious of being at the centre of the moment also then.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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