From afar

August 25, 2016

Lancing College from afar

 

Sometimes when seeing something from afar we can dismiss its importance to us. Perhaps we are unable to understand how this or that could have any influence over our life from such a distance. Indeed from afar numerous things seem inconsequential.

Yet if we think about many great inventions we take for granted today, it is perceivable their inventors had the capacity to pull out their creation from a vision in their mind. From afar these pioneers in various fields captured an idea other people may have seen, but had failed to comprehend.

However, in a similar way we have the ability to tap into our inner wisdom, a knowledge possibly coming from the depth of time. This source from afar is ours to use according to our values, aligned to our best intentions.

As with any issue regarding our progress through life, the way forward is personal and its relevance to us conceivably beyond our capability to express it in words. All the same, we hold onto an objective even if its existence is barely visible from afar, trusting it will be part of our future.

Two crucial elements in the process of reaching our goals are i) belief in our goals and ii) confidence in our ability to reach them. These things help us to go out and succeed in our efforts.

From afar this is quite likely evident to us. Getting up closer to the question we might begin to doubt ourselves. At this point the motivation which started us on this path will play a key role in moving us forward.

Thanks for reading this ‘From afar‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Forewarned

August 21, 2016

Warning sign

It might be handy if we were always forewarned about upcoming challenges or potential setbacks along our development path. After all, knowing what we are going to encounter helps us prepare ourselves to face them and, hopefully, overcome them.

In many instances we are indeed forewarned. The proverbial writing is often on the wall as lots of situations are merely repetitions of past occurrences. That said, the question concerning the extent we learn from the past needs pondering.

Moving through life as if everything is new and cropping up for the first time is an option. This can even be a way of appreciating the uniqueness of each moment. However, experience is also a part of life and tapping into it to be forewarned takes nothing away from being present right now.

One possible issue with being forewarned may be the building up of trepidation towards the aforementioned upcoming challenges or setbacks.

Instead of concentrating on putting plans and strategies into place to minimize their negative impact, we could fall into the trap of allowing them to develop in our mind to the point we are afraid of meeting them. Inertia rules over us as we become so obsessed and fearful.

As the saying goes, “Forewarned is forearmed.” By forgetting this we lose a certain amount of our effectiveness, rendering the way forward tougher than it perhaps need be. To share your thoughts on the idea of being forewarned, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Swimming in the moment

August 18, 2016

Swimming in the moment

With reference to swimming in the moment, some time ago I posted on Twitter (@bgdtcoaching) the following: “Swimming in the sea of change is better than drowning in the ocean of denial”.

Swimming in the moment, ideally in the sea of change as opposed to the ocean of denial, presupposes an ability to not only paddle about or merely float as it were in the present, but more specifically to be able to propel ourselves in a desired direction.

The waves of life impact constantly on the water in which we find ourselves swimming in the moment. On occasions these might be viewed favourably by us. They move us forward with ease towards our goal or destination. Then again, at times they capture us in turmoil and confusion.

Moving on with the idea of swimming in the moment, a series of simple questions may be worth a few minutes of contemplation.

How have you coped with challenges in the sea of change over these past few months? What will it be like to accomplish your main objective for this year? Finally, what is the key learning you can take from swimming in the moment as you move ahead now with your projects?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


A tranquil outlook

August 14, 2016

A tranquil outlook

Although the environment is not the only factor important for the creation of a tranquil outlook, it is undoubtedly a key item.

Nevertheless, linking our personal approach to life to the external world is at best a risky endeavour. Giving such a responsibility to something oftentimes beyond our control puts us at the mercy of whatever crops up to impact our surroundings.

A tranquil outlook that springs from the heart, on the contrary, is one capable of filling us with joy in any location. Our inner serenity, built possibly on the pillars of kindness and compassion, can be viewed as a personal guidance system.

It directs us in a way of being attuned to the finer qualities of human nature. With a tranquil outlook of this kind in operation we are capable of resisting the knee-jerk responses of anger or fear so prevalent in everyday interactions for many people.

Whether bringing into play the ability to appreciate what is beyond the immediate, or to let go of wanting to micromanage everything around us, a tranquil outlook is surely a beneficial mindset to adopt.

Over time we might, of course, find the necessity to put aside a tranquil outlook to engage in a more hands on manner with the moment. Flexibility to live the present as we deem best and knowing nothing is permanent are, arguably, also components of a tranquil outlook.

Thanks for reading this post today. To share your input on the issue of a tranquil outlook, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Turning our back

August 11, 2016

Seagull turning its back

It would be interesting, perhaps, to explore what we are turning our back on right now. It could be we are refusing to deal with an important though not yet urgent issue. Maybe we are consciously ignoring a question of little or no value to us.

Regardless of what we are turning our back on, by definition we are choosing to face something else in this instance. The act of deciding how we use our time, energy and other resources, is a key element of what it is to be a free individual.

On occasions we might choose to follow society, take the easy route through the moment and accept whatever happens as a result. That said, turning our back on this option, we get to exercise a responsibility for how we live.

Possibly the decision-making process is clouded by the presence of unclear positions. Few things are indeed so precisely structured to oblige us to select either ‘this’ or ‘that’. We can, for example, often turn around again after turning our back to embrace whatever is now before us, so to speak.

As with everything, our attitude towards our experience has the power to influence how we live the question and also the way we recall it at a later date.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Turning our back‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


In the country

August 7, 2016

In the country image

Being in the country can inspire some people to write poetry, sing songs or paint rolling landscapes. For others it is a time to reflect on how much they appreciate the comforts of city life. A middle way is possibly found by those who may embrace life in all its forms, wherever they are.

Of course time spent in the country is experienced through the eyes of the beholder and nobody really knows the full picture concerning the thoughts, attitudes, hopes and fears of another person, also as regard to being in the country.

A particular feature of a day out in the country – inevitably for me involving either the South Downs in the UK or the breathtaking hills of Molise in Italy – is the sense of open space such visits provide.

Although there is the option of looking up and connecting with the sky when in a city or town, it is something I often forget to do. In the country there is no forgetting. The sky kisses the horizon as the land reaches up to form a vivid image of vastness and wonder…

If you’d like to share your thoughts on being in the country, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


A new day

August 4, 2016

A new day breaking over the sea

No matter how yesterday went, today is a new day. It offers twenty-four hours to make amends, push forward towards desired goals, enjoy the moment as it is, or a combination of these options, and more besides.

A new day provides the opportunity for us to indulge in the making of decisions concerning how we live it. Asking ourselves the question “How would we really like to embrace this new day?” could produce a host of ideas. Listening to our heart might offer even more input.

Our actual usage of the new day will be individual as we all are. Just as no two people are alike, a new day lived according to your personal wants, needs or design will differ from that experienced by another person. Intentions put into action add to the outcome of how the day is lived.

Yet when folk say they have no time for personal and/or professional development over the course of a new day, what do they mean? Are they suggesting they are too busy with the routine of life to squeeze an activity – one with the potential to enhance their existence – into the day?

Maybe they are engaged with an overarching endeavour right now. If so, then yes, stepping back from taking on additional commitments is probably wise.

However, in many instances they are possibly indicating they prefer to give priority to other things as part of a new day. Such a decision is theirs, rightly so, to make. We all get to choose whether, and in many instances how, to live or not our potential day after day.

For now, let me just thank you for reading this post at the start, middle or end of a new day.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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