Building on a rock-solid idea

October 22, 2017

Village built on a rock

 

Having tested the theory for feasibility and practicability, it is time to go about building on a rock-solid idea. The strength of the concept will determine in large part the outcome of our development effects.

Throwing time, energy and other resources at an idea clearly limited in its viability is a strategy offering little chance of achieving anything positive. Building on a rock-solid idea, on the other hand, offers if not a guarantee then at least a greater probability of success.

In relation to our goals, building on a rock-solid idea is maybe the preferred starting point for an eventual positive conclusion. On those occasions we are obliged to build without the time to investigate the soundness of a notion, we will need to pay ongoing attention to the manner in which the project evolves.

At the first sign of problems, we should be prepared to implement every change possible to support efforts for the sake of protecting progress achieved to date or at least getting things back on course.

Each of us knows in our heart from the outset the viability of an idea. Provided we are not put off by the originality or newness of our dreams, plus the prospects of setbacks invariably part of any endeavour, we can focus on building on a rock-solid idea today for tomorrow.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 

Advertisements

Our place awaits us

October 19, 2017

Empty places in a theatre

 

Without suggesting political ideas or solutions concerning employment and immigration issues, ‘Our place awaits us’ can be read as an encouragement to tap into our potential for the sake of realising our best self and performing on the stage of life.

Once we have clarified our objective and set out a plan to reach it, specific action is crucial to achieving success. Yes, our place awaits us, and pondering the journey to this location may be pleasant, but only by undertaking it will we get nearer to our place.

In certain instances, it could be we are obliged to engage in activities seemingly far from the desired place we hold in our heart. Being clear about the validity of our overarching goal, we are able to accept diversions are nevertheless opportunities for us to learn something useful to take us to where our place awaits us.

Notwithstanding difficulties and challenges, or even perhaps because of these items, holding the idea that our place awaits us as a motivating factor is a key element of using our resources to the full. We risk to end up having to accept ‘any old place’ if we forget our life purpose or are distracted by daily events.

To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Our place awaits us’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


Putting up a facade to the moment

October 15, 2017

Facade

 

Sometimes it is not easy to face the day; issues might be testing us to the point we are unable to perform on the stage of life without putting up a facade to the moment. Our positive nature and open attitude just need the support, on occasions, from the protection offered by a front as it were.

When turning to the option of putting up a facade to the moment we perhaps find the strength to confront life. With the aim, in any case, of offering our all, we are in a sense still doing so by putting up a facade to the moment for the sake of ‘getting through the day’ any which way.

Nevertheless, hiding from the world and attempting to fool the public is not the intended message of this post. Authenticity is surely always suitable for developing and maintaining ongoing relationships. However, putting up a facade to the moment may also be a form of being authentic if done for the benefit of all.

Moving through life is, as ever, a question of using the best tools to hand for the situation or issue before us. If this means putting up a facade for the moment as we develop confidence, whilst respecting our values and focusing on long-term goals, then so be it.

Having gone about putting up a facade to the moment, we are able to operate for a while in the freedom or security created between the facade and the outside world. This period of development is possibly akin to the training or apprentice stage of work which lets us find our feet before ‘going live’ or ‘flying solo’.

Regardless of how we look at the question of putting up a facade to the moment, thanks for connecting here today to read this post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


Three benefits of the proverbial tea break

October 12, 2017

Tea pots

 

Upfront let me state the proverbial tea break could just as easily be read as a coffee break or even a cigarette break if that is your thing. We don’t need to worry unduly about the nature of the break when looking at three benefits of the proverbial tea break.

Thinking about three benefits of the proverbial tea break, we can list some general points, potentially appropriate to everyone. Specific advantages will, of course, be found on an individual basis according to the exact dynamics of the undertaking each of us is engaged in.

First of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

The actual object of the break – tea, coffee, cigarette, and so forth – brings with it a refreshing interruption to the flow of the day. Once reinvigorated we are ideally able to better face anew the challenges before us, perhaps with a new perspective available to us as a result of having taken onboard some ‘energy’.

Second of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

By taking a pause, we give ourselves the opportunity to step away from an endeavour or task to clear our head for a few minutes. A brief walk to the tea room, vending machine or smoking area gets the circulation going and this itself might be beneficial to us especially if our work involves much time at a desk.

Third of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

Breaks, even those of a short duration, provide an occasion to change the scenery and possibly interact with different people for a few minutes. It may be considered a form of networking and underlines the social element of life, also within a work setting.

If you’d like to share your thoughts on this ‘Three benefits of the proverbial tea break’ post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


Using points of references to guide our progress

October 8, 2017

Points of references

 

Without using points of references to guide our progress we can occasionally be lucky and actually arrive at our desired destination. The probability of a successful outcome to our efforts is, however, enhanced when we do go about using them.

What we take as our points of references will be related to the nature of the endeavour as well as to how we feel about it. We might wish to benchmark our progress using people we know who have gone before us. Alternatively, our progress could be measured against commonly known and widely available criteria.

Then again, we may choose specific items closely associated with the matter in question to assist us on our journey. Using points of references to guide our progress, in any case, keeps us fully focused on what we are attempting to do and where we are aiming to reach.

Whatever our way of using points of references to guide our progress, and accepting there will be times the path is tough going, we should remind ourselves often why we are aiming to move from where we are to a different location, be it physical or figurative. Clarity concerning this is a key factor to reaching our goal.

For now, thanks for being here and reading this ‘Using points of references to guide our progress’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


Being clear about what we want to see

October 5, 2017

Clear outlook

 

Looking in a haphazard manner is fine in certain circumstances yet being clear about what we want to see is ideal for those situations when clarity is called for.

We might find it ironic to ponder clarity from the perspective of being clear about what we want to see. In many ways perhaps it is. Nevertheless, with an intention firmly established prior to engaging in the activity of looking we will most likely find the exercise valid.

Having decided our objective for the undertaking we should not, however, believe it is enough to guarantee what we eventually see will be exactly what we hoped for. We can do our bit in the process of observing but the result does not depend entirely on us.

Being clear about what we want to see naturally influences where we go about searching. Knowing our desired outcome points us in one direction as opposed to another. If the question is related to a specific issue then this too acts as a point of reference for our activity.

Another consideration to keep in mind regarding the notion of being clear about what we want to see is that of trusting there exists the object in question to be seen. Wanting to see unicorns in the local park is one thing, actually seeing them could turn out to be a completely different matter.

To join the conversation here please feel free to leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Being clear about what we want to see’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


Why having the right tools makes the job easier

October 1, 2017

Tools for the job

 

It is really quite obvious that to get something done well we ought to use the appropriate instruments. As such, why having the right tools makes the job easier seems something we can all understand immediately.

Nevertheless, so often tasks are doled out without thought as to what is needed in terms of time, resources and indeed tools by those being given the work. Impossible deadlines are familiar to many service providers and yet for a variety of reasons are accepted as ‘the way business is done nowadays’.

It is feasible to imagine how much better many actions would have been had someone either a) thought about why having the right tools makes the job easier prior to diving into it, or b) asked what the person charged to do the activity required to complete it effectively.

Why having the right tools makes the job easier’ is perhaps a cliché because it stands up to inspection and being a basic truth is worth repeating time and time again with reference to most, if not all, assignments.

‘Making do’, ’Getting by’ and ‘Keeping our fingers crossed’ are also options commonly encountered within the world of work. The results obtained when these practices are followed are those we might see in many instances in terms of poor customer service, faulty workmanship, and overall indifference.

Such things themselves suggest anew why having the right tools makes the job easier and offers a greater probability of a successful outcome.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 


%d bloggers like this: