Noticing patterns

September 25, 2016

Noticing patterns on ceramics

 

Without being observant it is difficult to engage in the practice of noticing patterns amid events and occurrences. The necessity to be both physically and mentally present is clear.

Noticing patterns implies we are able to bring together various distinct inputs and, with a capacity to see beyond the immediate, make out a form or trend from the items. In a sense it is a way to foresee future situations as, by noticing patterns, we are anticipating their actual development.

Noticing patterns can also be a skill we use to bring into being new solutions to as yet undisclosed needs. Looking forward then backwards with an eye to merging ‘what will be’ with ‘what could be’ brings forth the opportunity for inventions to come into existence.

On a daily basis, however, noticing patterns is something we might undertake as we recognize the impact of past mistakes.

To improve results we will need to work on amending our habits. Taking our effort as a constant, the variable component of an outcome is our action. If we fail to change this, then nothing is likely to alter.

Noticing patterns along these lines is, of course, only beneficial to the extent we act on our observations.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Blooming late

September 22, 2016

Garden blooming late

 

If we are able to recognize the individuality of us all, then perhaps we also appreciate how some of us are ‘blooming late‘ when compared to others, but not when evaluated against the obstacles overcome to achieve this ‘mature’ success.

Oftentimes people fulfil goals regardless of whether they have the encouragement, support or approval of the world at large. Possibly the key point is to trust ourselves and strive to be our best despite what anyone else thinks: ‘blooming late‘ is surely better than ‘never at all’.

Continuing with the idea of personal development, at times ‘blooming late‘ may refer to a lost opportunity. For whatever reasons we just lose out on say a promotion, a job offer or tender for a project by missing the deadline. Even whilst understanding this is not the ‘end of the world’, the subsequent frustration is never pleasant. Learning from it, however, can help us grow.

Blooming late” could, of course, be an exclamation we use to describe our colleagues, friends or acquaintances when waiting for a scheduled get-together. It might not be the most endearing phrase, yet on occasions it has its value nonetheless.

To share your thoughts on the issue of ‘blooming late‘, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Still waters

September 18, 2016

Still waters

 

Exploring the idea of still waters can be approached from a variety of perspectives, though here we will stop at just three.

In the first instance, the issue might bring to mind a relaxing location with still waters, near to which we are able to find tranquillity. It is a place we could perhaps choose to revisit, if not physically then at least in our mind, when we find ourselves struggling to cope with the stresses and tensions of ‘modern living’.

A second viewpoint regarding still waters is one connected with the depth of understanding and competency we have amassed in a particular area of our life. Possibly we have mastered a skill and are now able to undertake it unconsciously. Our effort flows as if it were an extension of ourselves.

Thirdly, “Still waters run deep” goes the cliché. Yet, as with most overused expressions, there is an element of truth to support its popular message. The currents of a situation may be invisible to the eye, especially if we are distracted by the surface calmness. However, it is dangerous to assume there is no turbulence below. As ever, holding back from making snap judgements ensures we are not caught out by the still waters we encounter day by day.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Anticipating the moment

September 15, 2016

Waiting for a performance

 

By placing something in the agenda, or noting it as a forthcoming item, we are in a sense anticipating the moment of its arrival.

Looking at the issue of anticipating the moment from a positive perspective, we might wish to highlight the way in which we mentally rehearse the instance in question. The visualization of a desired moment is a key element of preparing for it.

Giving ourselves sufficient time to approach a deadline, scheduled activity or the like in a serene mode is another form of anticipating the moment in a proactive manner. As we most likely know – to a general extent at least – our commitments over the coming few months, there is little reason to be caught out, unprepared for this or that.

In terms of waiting in the wings ahead of stepping onto the proverbial stage to perform our work, we can go about anticipating the moment as an opportunity to centre ourselves in the present and focus attention on executing the upcoming task to the best of our abilities.

Once the moment we have been anticipating actually arrives, we may choose to let go of any lingering fears, doubts and/or negative thinking about our effort and embrace fully the here and now. By doing so we give respect, it could be argued, to the time previously spent anticipating the moment.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Freedom to be ourselves

September 11, 2016

Seagull flying freely

 

That in theory we all have the freedom to be ourselves is probably clear to everyone. Reality at times, unfortunately, fails to mirror the theory for some people.

Restrictions regarding the freedom to be ourselves in certain instances can reside in the mind. On other occasions, shackles may be traced to external influences such as social conditioning or a refusal to recognize the fact human rights are universal: ‘them’ and ‘us’ rather than ‘them’ or ‘us’.

From a more personal perspective, the freedom to be ourselves gives us the chance to express ourselves in a manner most befitting of who we are, or at least who we believe we are. This discretionary element is itself part of the liberty we have, an ability to embrace life on our terms.

Our values and goals direct us as we stretch our proverbial wings and fly above the immediate to connect with the fullness of our potential. Perspectives, as ever, set out for a moment of reflection. To share your input on the question of freedom to be ourselves, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Stretching ahead

September 8, 2016

Beach huts stretching ahead

 

No matter where we are as we read this post, the view of what is before is probably stretching ahead of us. The view, however, may be somewhat limited due to natural or man-made obstructions. In any case we know it is all before us and that is what counts.

Stretching ahead into a moment of time beyond the now, we might appreciate how our best efforts to date have brought us to a position of well-being and fulfilment. If so, this vision will inspire us to undertake any or all the necessary actions needed to bring our current desired goals into being.

Making choices appropriate for us today for tomorrow is very much a matter of aligning decisions with heartfelt objectives capable of stretching ahead into an unknown future whilst motivating us along the path towards the destination.

Provided we enjoy the journey – if we are unable to do so, perhaps we need to reconsider the goal – the final result stretching ahead becomes almost of secondary importance. Such thinking should possibly, in any case, be assessed in terms of embracing our life purpose instead of instant gratification.

If you’d like to explore further issues related to your choices and heartfelt objectives in the form of a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

For now, rather than stretching ahead with other ideas here, it could be wise to bring this post to a close.

Thanks for connecting.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Waiting patiently

September 4, 2016

People waiting patiently

 

It is probably fair to say most people are loathed to spend time waiting patiently. In some cases it could be certain folk are actually unable to spend more than a few minutes on the exercise. Others may have merely decided they are never going to wait for anything or anyone.

Yet when circumstances permit – or we control ourselves enough to undertake it – waiting patiently can bring unexpected benefits. The first of these could be related to a calming down of ourselves as we engage in the unusual activity of doing nothing else besides waiting.

Doing just one thing rather than spread our energy across a number of matters offers the mind a chance to catch up as it were.

Another potential advantage connected to waiting patiently is the opportunity we give ourselves to appreciate life at a pace different from the frenzied one we might engage in on a daily basis. Seeing our surroundings from this perspective allows us to embrace further our position in the world.

So often the richness of our existence is lost in the hustle and bustle of our ‘normal’ routine. That birds sing, clouds drift across the sky, some people actually smile and so on, can easily be lost to us if we are not waiting patiently, but huffing and puffing instead about time lost here or there.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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