Why do we tolerate so much?

May 23, 2019

Why do we tolerate so much? Yes, really, why do we put up with lots of items, big or small, that are causing upset in our life?

In many instances, at least this is what quite a few coaching clients have suggested they were doing. Alternative approaches are not even considered until we begin to reflect on our life.

So often we seem to move through each day as if on automatic pilot. Nuisances and irritations are almost expected and little thought is given to resolving them. Instead, we tolerate them, deal with them on a temporary basis, rarely thinking to go to the root cause and do something tangible about them.

Why do we tolerate so much? As we don’t appear to be taking control of aspects of life under our authority, on a grand scale, maybe we should be asking who is profiting from the constant tensions and inequalities filling daily news reports?

So many ‘unacceptable behaviours’ – taking the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a benchmark for ‘acceptable behaviours’ – could be stopped in a relatively short time if there was the joint will to do it.

Okay, rant over. To share your input on the issue of ‘Why do we tolerate so much?’, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Letting go of envy

May 19, 2019

In a world consumed with appearance and possession letting go of envy could be considered a radical activity.

Yet with so many people feeling the pressure to keep up with ………………… (complete with the ‘influencer’ of your choice), letting go of envy might just be the ideal action to relieve some of the stress.

As a human response, envy is perhaps not investigated very much but in one form or another, we can relate to it. Letting go of envy implies, therefore, that it will on occasions enter our mind.

And rather than attempting to suppress it or deny its existence, letting go of envy maybe with a silent acknowledgement of its presence can help us release its grip on our thinking.

Rationalizing out the issue is another way of dealing with envy yet requires mindful attention to the cause of our envy and when overwhelmed with feelings of upset such an approach is not easy.

If you’d like to explore the idea of letting go of envy as part of a coaching conversation, please get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Letting go of envy’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Giving away personal responsibility

May 16, 2019

Giving away personal responsibility can occur in a number of ways and for a variety of reasons. Let’s look at a few of these.

Ways of giving away personal responsibility

1) Allowing others to make decisions for us when we suspect another choice is more aligned with our values.

2) Refusing to speak up or out when situations are not to our liking.

3) Accepting the status quo on those occasions a change on our part would be more beneficial to us.

Reasons for giving away personal responsibility

a) A lack of clarity on our part as to our life purpose.

b) Fear of creating waves or upsetting those around us by ‘imposing’ our will on them.

c) An unwillingness to put in the effort and energy required to implement a change strategy.

Others ways of giving away personal responsibility as well as additional reasons for doing so are, of course, there to be reviewed. Please feel free to share your thoughts below.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Giving away personal responsibility’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Spending time with people we actually like

May 12, 2019

Leaving aside work and other occasions in which we have no say over who is around us, to what degree are we spending time with people we actually like?

Those moments in which we are spending time with people we actually like possibly make up the most memorable parts of each day for us. Yet why we might limit ourselves to so few such instances could be due to a number of reasons.

These may include being a) so focused on our goals we are unwilling to share our time with anyone, b) too wrapped up in someone else’s agenda to give time to our priorities and c) attached to the role of ‘the person who never stops working’, even for loved ones.

Choosing to be spending time with people we actually like is, in a way, a courageous activity. And when doing it with all our attention, we deserve a proverbial pat on the back.

If you wish to explore the extent you are giving time to people important to you as part of a coaching conversation, please get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Spending time with people we actually like’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Connecting to the individual before us

May 9, 2019

Regardless of how the day is going, our attitude towards it is ours to control and how we go about connecting to the individual before us impacts significantly on the way we eventually look back on today.

Connecting to the individual before us as a person rather than an obstacle to be dealt with opens all sort of learning for us. We might discover people actually want to help instead of hinder us if we only just give them a few instances of quality attention.

Furthermore, connecting to the individual before us offers us the chance to treat people as humans. And, if necessary, show them compassion for the difficulties they may be facing as they juggle our needs on top of everything else.

Of course, how others treat us is linked to this issue of connecting to the individual before us, yet we have no say over their actual behaviour. Perhaps all we can do is not give them too many reasons to think we deserve to be mistreated.

To share your input on the topic of connecting to the individual before us, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Completing one action today

May 5, 2019

Like it or not, completing one action today will make more impact on tomorrow than all the unfinished activities we are currently wrapped up in.

Results matter when focusing on productivity. Being busy being busy is a strategy for getting through the day but one unlikely to bring us closer to our main goal.

On the other hand, completing one action today indicates, at least to ourselves, our ability to prioritize time and energy for the sake of getting done what we have designated as crucial.

That said, the pressure to not engage in completing one action today can be tremendous. Being able to shut out distractions, resist getting caught up in office gossip and politics plus the multitude of notices arriving across our screens takes willpower.

Reminding ourselves why we want to achieve this or that, however, helps us as we go about completing one action today. Connecting with the desired outcome, as it were, might just be the inspiration we require right here, right now.

Regardless of how you view the issue of ‘Completing one action today’, thanks for reading this post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Trusting our heart

May 2, 2019

In a certain sense, most of these posts over the years have dealt with the concept of trusting our heart. Various aspects of the theme may have been highlighted yet the core idea has remained the same.

As an activity, trusting our heart is one needing no explanations. We choose to rely on what we feel is right for us at any given moment. And even if we are unable to explain our decision in words, we instinctively know it is appropriate for us.

When looking at the notion of trusting our heart as a way of living we are perhaps implying it is a more relevant source of input than that provided by rational thinking. After all, we are the ‘experts’ on our lives and who better than us can be called on to look after our interests.

If you’d like to ponder this issue of trusting our heart as part of a coaching conversation, please let me know.

In the meantime, thanks for connecting and reading this ‘Trusting our heart’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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