Wave after wave

February 10, 2016

Wave after wave breaking in the sea

Wave after wave of questions may come to mind when linking the sea with personal development. To what extent are our actions guided by external currents rather than the wisdom of our heart? How do we relate to the nature around us? Is the tide taking us towards or away from our key goals?

Wave after wave of ideas might flow as we go about exploring where we are and what is available to help us reach our desired destination in life. Managing the input is a responsibility as individual as we are. Using the information obtained is likewise a task we each have to deal with personally.

The limits we place on our vision of the moment – consisting perhaps of beliefs, doubts, fears and hopes – will impact on how we go about living today and tomorrow. An evaluation of these could result in a widening of our horizons, a confirmation of our course or a change of direction possibly.

Certainly the wave after wave brings also a sense of continuity. Whilst life is transient, the elements of our world, and in this case specifically water, provide an example of flow. The movement of the sea seems to be inviting us to dip our toes, as it were, into the fullness of life.

If you’d like to share your input about the ideas set out here, please leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘Wave after wave‘ post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Twenty to eight

February 7, 2016

Clock showing twenty to eight

Twice a day it is twenty to eight and twice a day we have the opportunity to make of it what we will. That we should choose to focus on twenty to eight is not important. Possibly it is a time we associate with certain events of the day, or then again perhaps not.

Thinking about twenty to eight in the morning, what ideas come to mind? Is it a time in which we are already fully engaged or does it represent a moment of starting anew?

The activities undertaken in the morning might set up the day to be lived in the best possible manner. We could be the type of people who regularly wake up early and, as such, twenty to eight in the morning may actually seem like midday to us.

Alternatively, if the day doesn’t begin until at least three cups of coffee have been consumed and the clock has struck eleven, twenty to eight will seem like the middle of the night.

In a similar fashion, twenty to eight in the evening can represent an end to the working day with dinner calling us to the table, or a time forming early evening in which we are already relaxing and looking to tomorrow. Either way, it is for us to interpret and explore as we think best.

If it were twenty to eight and you had to complete a single task related to your key objectives by eight, what would you decide to do right now? How far forward do you think a period of concentrated effort has the power to take you? What is stopping you from giving it a go?

To share your input on the question of ‘Twenty to eight‘, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Too many items

February 4, 2016

Many items in a shop

Too many items may seem to be a phrase expressing a judgement on this or that. In actual fact it could just be an observation of what is for us, right now, in front of us. Certain objects might seem unnecessary elements cluttering the surroundings. And possibly they are.

Too many items at times represent the habit of indulging the urge to acquire more, often without thought to the eventual added value the pieces concerned offer us. By taking a step back and evaluating the question of ‘too many items‘ we are taking responsibility for our environment.

Letting go of this, keeping that, freeing ourselves from that and appreciating this anew, are things we have the power to do. And from the exercise clarity has the opportunity to emerge. Too many items can just turn out to be a fair assessment, or then again perhaps not. It is for us to discover.

Looking at the issue from a wider picture, to what extent are we loading our agenda with too many items? What are we gaining from attempting to undertake everything? How successful have we been with this strategy to date?

The honest answers to these questions are found in our heart and made evident through our relationship with the agenda. The feelings we have with what we have to do, or at least have accepted to do, speak loudly about whether we have too many items on our plate or not.

Thanks for reading this ‘Too many items‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


The unexpected

January 31, 2016

 

Unexpected image

It is easy to suggest we should expect the unexpected, but secretly believe we know exactly what is going to occur at any given time. After all, most things that could happen have indeed happened somewhere, at sometime, in some way, goes the thinking.

Few things are really surprising nowadays. Perhaps the unexpected element comes from our reaction to each moment. Being prepared in our work is a key part of giving and being our best. Taking time to ensure we are as comfortable as possible with what we have to do, takes us from where we are to where we need to be to perform our duties.

However, being knocked off course by the unexpected at whatever phase of the project or assignment can come about. Even so, how long we stay ‘off course’ is many times ours to determine.

Letting go of angry reactions or outbursts of frustration, we have the choice to calmly assess the changed environment around us. And potentially the unexpected brings clarity to our reality. Change is neutral, our response to it provides the label of either positive or negative.

A list of the unexpected is by definition difficult to draw up. However, it might be interesting to ponder the idea using the question ‘What would have the power to propel us to our goal?’ Exploring this perspective would possibly lead us to the unexpected idea capable of assisting us on our way.

For now, let me bring this post to a close. Please, as ever, feel free to share your thoughts on the issue of the unexpected here today by leaving a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


The obstacle before us

January 27, 2016

Obstacle before us

Without clarifying the obstacle before us, it is easy to think all is impossible. From such a position, the jump to berating ourselves for attempting to do this or that is short. Once we are following this line of thinking, the decision to give up is usually reached pretty quickly.

Of course this mindset is not the only one available to connect with. The obstacle before us may actually be holding all sorts of opportunities for us to develop ourselves, our resolve and our determination to reach certain goals.

The obstacle before us, in this case, should perhaps be appreciated as a moment for us to demonstrate our ability to handle challenges. What the issue has to teach us could be found by embracing it, as opposed to instinctively shying away from it.

Reaching a goal without having to overcome an obstacle, might leave us feeling short-changed. ‘The journey seemed too easy’ or ‘I didn’t really have to do anything, so I’m not worthy of praise’. Unfortunately these tales we tell ourselves can spoil the moment if we think they are true.

Being curious I’d love to learn your thoughts on the topic examined here, accordingly don’t hesitate to leave a comment below if you so wish. For now, thanks for reading ‘The obstacle before us‘.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Taking the biscuit

January 24, 2016

Biscuits

Rather than looking at the issue of taking the biscuit from a negative perspective, let’s consider briefly how we could choose the proverbial biscuit from a position of gratitude.

As a way of making someone happy, we can go about taking the biscuit in a harmonious manner. Bearing the considerations of others in mind is certainly a heartfelt gesture on our part, and one expressing appreciation for the presence of those within our circle of influence and the like.

Taking the biscuit to not hurt the feelings of another person is, likewise, a way of being open to those around us. We all have preferences to impact on the eventual choice as we go about taking the biscuit, yet these need not be allowed to ride roughshod over anyone else, nor indeed our values.

‘Jammy dodger’ is not a title likely to be welcomed by us or others, unless any of us are actually biscuits… Putting aside the cookie jar, ‘taking the biscuit‘ is, of course, an expression commonly used to refer to someone doing something possibly unexpected or maybe out of character.

Have I been taking the biscuit to put forward these ideas today? Hopefully not. For now, in any case, let me just thank you for connecting here to read this ‘Taking the biscuit‘ post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


The basics

January 21, 2016

Basic fruit

“With the basics in place, the performance can flow.” #bgdtcoaching.

Each endeavour usually consists of a couple of parts: the basics and the details. Getting the basics sorted gives us the opportunity to move onto the details in a smooth and measured manner.

The basics might be initial training and practice at the start of an assignment. These items have their own timetable. Though we could be tempted to jump straight into a project, it is invariably a false time-saver. Without the basics being in place, our performance cannot flow as desired.

In terms of personal development, the basics may be the answers we give to a number of key questions about our objectives and how we wish to implement our potential.

To what extent are we happy with our current situation? What do we gain by being where we are? In which way would life be different if we were to listen more to our heart? How prepared are we to ensure our true self is, or remains, at the centre of our existence?

The basics are not always easy items to work with, yet they do indeed provide a foundation for further growth.

As each of us defines the basics according to our personal situation, there is little reason for me to labour the concept here any longer. Let me end by thanking you for reading ‘The basics‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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