Being comfortable wherever we are

September 23, 2018

Comfortable location

Following on from the previous post – How rounded is our approach to life? – it seems right to look at the notion of being comfortable wherever we are.

We might be referring to our physical location when thinking about being comfortable wherever we are. There are certain places we are at ease: home, our workplace hopefully, at the gym, and so on. Here we don’t need to hide behind any facade or lose time attempting to be something we aren’t.

Other locations could be more testing for us, yet we are still able to go about being comfortable wherever we are, including in so-called difficult environments.

Being comfortable wherever we are, having self-confidence, comes not from a sense of being better than anyone else, nor from arrogance. It stems from a basic belief in our ability to be our best, knowing there will be times this is enough as well as moments it won’t be.

Looking at challenges or setbacks as steps along the development path helps to put such items in a manageable dimension. Taking learning from these instances is beneficial to our growth and indeed keeps us rounded to refer to the previous post again.

As always, your input adds value to the ideas expressed here, so please don’t hesitate to share by leaving a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Being comfortable wherever we are’ post, wherever you are.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How rounded is our approach to life?

September 20, 2018

Rounded building

Appreciating there are occasions in which issues need to be faced in a direct fashion, without even pondering opposing strategies, how rounded is our approach to life?

We might wish to think about our ‘usual reaction’ to challenges forming our everyday routine. Letting some things go whilst concentrating on others, more significant items we can say, is part of what it may mean to have a rounded approach to life.

On the other hand, taking a stand on every issue, confronting people before us as if each of their words and actions were declarations of hostilities, suggests we are anything but rounded.

There are times this confrontational attitude could be viewed as appropriate. All the same, knowing when to hold our ground and when to, figuratively or literally, walk away, is a skill worth developing. So, how rounded is our approach to life?

When considering the question ‘How rounded is our approach to life?’, the words of Don Miguel Ruiz are worth recalling: “Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream.”

Thanks for reading this ‘How rounded is our approach to life?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian has taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Letting our music play

September 16, 2018

Sheets of music

It doesn’t matter whether we are musicians or not, letting our music play here refers to the idea of freeing ourselves from any limiting beliefs, doubts or fears impeding us from living our potential.

In certain instances, letting our music play might include releasing the negative mindset we have bought into concerning our abilities. Of course, there will be some things we are not very good at right now – probably these are activities for whatever reason we have no interest or need in attempting.

Let’s not forget our success to date, our achievements plus the aspects of our character and life people compliment us on. These are examples of us letting our music play. And as we have already done it we can do it again!

Pushing the proverbial button, to what extent do we hold back from letting our music play because we feel, consciously or subconsciously, the world is not ready to hear it? Are we suggesting it is too powerful for those around us, therefore, remain silent rather than frighten or offend people near and dear to us?

With so much noise already surrounding us the idea of silence is an attractive one. Nevertheless, without letting our music play are we not doing ourselves and others a great disservice?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the issue of letting our music play, so please feel free to leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What do the coming months look like to you?

September 13, 2018

View over river

I don’t think for one moment you are reading this ‘What do the coming months look like to you?’ post with a crystal ball at your side. However, it is probably fair to suggest you have given some thought to what you aim to do with the rest of the year.

The outlook for all of us will, of course, be influenced by some factors under our control in addition to those beyond our direct area of responsibility. Events relating to political, economic, social and technical matters bring changes to our world almost in real time.

Setting aside external issues, we can focus on what we intend to implement, improve, enhance, maintain or eliminate, for the sake of reaching our desired goals. Where you are right now is the starting point when considering the question ‘What do the coming months look like to you?

If all has been successful to date in terms of following plans drawn up at the start of the year, then actions from now on will be an extension of this winning strategy. Amending tactics, on the contrary, might be the best option should things be different to how they were hoped for.

To explore your intended efforts for the rest of the year with regard to the inquiry What do the coming months look like to you? in the form of a complimentary coaching conversation, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

Thanks for taking a few minutes to read this ‘What do the coming months look like to you?’ post, I hope it has provided input for reflection.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What are the benefits of adopting a peaceful mindset?

September 9, 2018

Peaceful view

What are the benefits of adopting a peaceful mindset? Cynics, if they are reading this might respond “Probably none”. But let’s put that aside to showcase three potential advantages.

1) We let go of pain and stress associated with anger and a sense of ‘Them against Us’. Life is not always easy, but facing challenges with anything less than a peaceful mindset adds to the tension of the moment.

2) A peaceful mindset puts us in a position to embrace the world in a calm and balanced manner. We may choose to disagree with certain aspects or ideas, yet do so in a measured way rather than with an aggressive “I’m right, you’re wrong!” reaction.

3) Life is too short for it to be wasted on things that fail to enhance harmony for all around us, plus ourselves. Short-term gains amassed by thinking only of personal interests quickly turn into motives for disputes when a peaceful mindset is not present.

Anyway, what are the benefits of adopting a peaceful mindset in your opinion? If you would like to share your input, please leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘What are the benefits of adopting a peaceful mindset?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent can nature clean up after us?

September 6, 2018

to-what-extent-can-nature

 

Any urban planners, construction experts or even waste disposal specialists reading this post may be able to pull the ideas expressed here to pieces.

It is not an article written on the twin pillars of facts and figures, merely a heartfelt pondering aloud, based on a love for our world, as to what extent can nature clean up after us?

Most locations in the so-called modernized world have a collection of derelict buildings that, for reasons certainly unbeknown to me, is neither being destroyed nor restored.

We hear so much about the need for more housing and that land to build new dwellings is at a premium nowadays.

Given these points, why are so many disused facilities just left to blight the landscape? To what extent can nature clean up after us?

Rather than asking “To what extent can nature clean up after us?”, the question possibly should be “Why should we expect nature to clean up after us?”

Thanks for reading this today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Limits we place on ourselves

September 2, 2018

Road sign

 

Certain restrictions may derive from authorities and institutions about which we have no say. That said, the limits we place on ourselves are there due to us and we have a say in overcoming them or not.

Limits we place on ourselves include also those created by our negative outlook, demeaning self-talk and constant focus on our mistakes to the detriment of our success. Breaking the habits associated with these limits we place on ourselves goes a long way to readdressing the balance in our life.

Things no longer remain all gloomy, nor do they take on a positive perspective. They appear as they are, giving us the opportunity to handle them in accordance to the moment and in a fashion best suited to our outlook.

Of course, there will be limits we place on ourselves that shape our general approach to life and guide our actions. These are connected to our values and represent the structure of our way of being. It is for us to say we view these items not as ‘limits’ as such, but as points of reference. And this is fine too.

If you’d like to explore the limits you place on yourself, and even attempt to see beyond them, as part of a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

In the meantime, thanks for being here and for reading about the ‘limits we place on ourselves’.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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