The finishing line

Railway buffer

The finishing line is merely the starting point for a new venture seen from behind” #bgdtcoaching.

How we regard this moment of our work, as the finishing line of one project or the starting point of another, or even the middle of many if appropriate, is fundamentally a question of perspective.

Most of us rarely have the luxury of completing one venture before beginning with the next. An overlapping of tasks is the norm today it seems. And resisting the pressure to commit to a job when realistically it would be better to turn it down is not always easy.

However, if we can hold our ground and focus on reaching a successful conclusion prior to getting started with a new activity, results will most likely compensate us for the effort.

The finishing line comes at the end of a task and symbolically suggests we have moved forward and expanded our experience by reaching out. As ever though, these thoughts are set out for reflection and offered as just one perspective of the matter, the starting point rather than the finishing line.

If you’d like to share your input on the issue of the finishing line and what it signifies for you, please leave a comment below.

Thanks for being here today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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