No entry

No entry sign

In my last post I pondered the issue of open doors (click here to read). Today it feels right to look at the opposite side of the matter, occasions when there is no entry for us.

No entry, besides being a road sign, could be read as a barrier or obstacle limiting our progress towards our objectives. For whatever reasons we might find the path before us closed off. If we are fortunate, it will be a temporary setback requiring just a little more effort on our part in the form of additional learning and preparation.

Alternatively the halt may be permanent, in which case we need to reassess our plans and make the necessary changes to them to accommodate the latest situation. In either case, we have the possibility to view no entry as a learning opportunity for us.

No entry need not be read as ‘No entry at all, never, in no way thinkable’. No entry refers to just one option, and others await us if we choose to look for them.

Once we get beyond our initial consternation and disappointment regarding the forced change to our strategy, we can begin the process of moving anew towards our goal, albeit taking a different route perhaps.

Thanks for reading this No entry post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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