Symmetry

Symmetry in a building

There is a kind of symmetry to our actions when being and doing are balanced, perhaps in such a way to give meaning to our efforts in any given moment.

Looking at the question of symmetry from a position of awareness, we might choose to see how we invariably know the right thing to do in any situation. This knowing is found in a symmetrical way by being aligned to our heart. Going against our intuition produces an asymmetrical feeling.

Exploring the issue of symmetry from another perspective, one perhaps symmetrically opposite to the previous point, we could choose to focus on the result rather than action.

Actions cause reactions and symmetry plays its part in this basic formula. Without an input the output would be zero, and without effort no results could be obtained.

However we express the idea of symmetry here, we should perhaps not lose sight of the idea of accepting each effort in its own right. There is no need to search for complicated associations involving symmetry. The value of being and doing is found in the good intention in our heart.

Thanks for connecting here today. Your presence adds to the symmetry of the day.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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