At the table

Table

Sitting at the table of life – be it at work, home or anywhere in between – may not necessarily mean we have ‘arrived’. It could be we are seated temporarily, as we wait for a permanent position here or there.

Looking around us, we might discover our place at the table is tied to the efforts we made yesterday. If the place at the table, figuratively speaking, is to our liking then it was all worthwhile. Yet if we’d prefer to be somewhere else, we need to change our approach today for a better tomorrow.

Once we are settled at the table, we are in a position to not only enjoy the sustenance the moment provides – for our body, soul and mind – but also share what we have with those around us. In this way the pleasure is expanded as more people can appreciate this present moment.

From another perspective, it is perhaps worth considering how long we choose to remain at the table. In certain circumstances we are obliged to stay until all are ready to leave. However, it is often enough for us to stay just as long as our time there is valid, for ourselves and for others.

The secret, of course, is to know when to stay at the table and when to get up from it.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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