Maintaining traditions

Traditional pasta making shop

The motivation for maintaining traditions may be varied. Some possibly wish to keep alive ‘the old ways’ of doing things, whilst others merely cannot be bothered to invest time looking for new approaches and the like.

In certain cases it could be the idea of maintaining traditions is linked to best practices. If we are to undertake particular tasks at a clearly defined standard of performance, this seems sensible. Applying experience acquired over time can help ensure the outcome reaches the desired level.

There will be unexpected elements impacting on the eventual efforts we make. However, preparing to the best of our abilities, while maintaining traditions in the process if applicable, will ideally limit the negative downside of these unforeseen inputs.

Reaching a point whereby we might even begin to suggest the concept of maintaining traditions itself implies a vast amount of practice has been given to the task in question. And this will, in a perfect world or at least one we are aiming to achieve, assist us in replicating our top performance.

Thanks for connecting here. To share your thoughts on the issue of maintaining traditions, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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