Window on the world

Windows

No matter the definition we give our stage of work, our outlook provides a window on the world. We may hold a positive, negative or indeed neutral view of our environment and position within it.

The window of the world could on occasions be in need of a clean, especially if soiled by prejudices, fears or doubts. On the other hand, should it be the window on the world looks out on a fascinating scene, we might need to look away if we are too distracted.

A window on the world is, in a sense, a reflection of all we have experienced and accomplished to date. It is easy for each of us to forget the work we have undertaken to reach where we are. Ideally we are exactly where we want to be, or at least further along the path than say this time last year.

However, without judging ourselves against others or seeking excuses for any perceived lack of progress in our development to date, we get to start anew today from here. A window on the world is before us and what we do now will impact on what we see later, as well as where we see it from.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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