Going nowhere

Pier going nowhere

 

It might seem after many days of preparation, coupled with an execution of our work to the best of our ability, we are actually going nowhere if we fail to receive the response we had hoped for. Unfortunately as much as we can manage our input, the reaction from those receiving our efforts is beyond our direct control.

Accepting this situation is a bitter pill, yet one worth the discomfort of swallowing. Free from the belief we are able to dictate how our work is received, we are in a better position to concentrate on operating to our potential. Going nowhere, in this case, is far from the truth. Ideally we are already heading in the desired direction through the undertakings we engage in, and hopefully performing successfully.

Going nowhere, on the other hand, should possibly be the label for those occasions when we let doubts and fears dominate us to the point we fail to even attempt to put on stage whatever we have been preparing so diligently. But then those moments of going nowhere are rare, no?

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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