Smiles all round

Smiling man

It is probably fair to say following the execution of our work we all appreciate a positive reaction from the recipient or beneficiary of our efforts, summed up by the phrase ‘smiles all round‘.

Reaching this satisfying conclusion depends, however, as much on us performing well the particular task as the audience feeling obliged or inspired to offer smiles all round. The one without the other cannot produce the result we desire.

Naturally though, when we do achieve a warm glow by receiving smiles all round, it may encourage us to repeat the level of performance the next time we are required to engage in the task.

In actual fact, whether we obtain smiles all round or not, in all likelihood we will already be motivated to give our all anew. Only in this way are we able to find fulfilment in our work. The alternative of ‘just going through the motions’ benefits few people, least of all ourselves.

To share your thoughts on the ideas raised here, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Smiles all round‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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