Freedom to be ourselves

Seagull flying freely

 

That in theory we all have the freedom to be ourselves is probably clear to everyone. Reality at times, unfortunately, fails to mirror the theory for some people.

Restrictions regarding the freedom to be ourselves in certain instances can reside in the mind. On other occasions, shackles may be traced to external influences such as social conditioning or a refusal to recognize the fact human rights are universal: ‘them’ and ‘us’ rather than ‘them’ or ‘us’.

From a more personal perspective, the freedom to be ourselves gives us the chance to express ourselves in a manner most befitting of who we are, or at least who we believe we are. This discretionary element is itself part of the liberty we have, an ability to embrace life on our terms.

Our values and goals direct us as we stretch our proverbial wings and fly above the immediate to connect with the fullness of our potential. Perspectives, as ever, set out for a moment of reflection. To share your input on the question of freedom to be ourselves, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
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Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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