Still waters

Still waters

 

Exploring the idea of still waters can be approached from a variety of perspectives, though here we will stop at just three.

In the first instance, the issue might bring to mind a relaxing location with still waters, near to which we are able to find tranquillity. It is a place we could perhaps choose to revisit, if not physically then at least in our mind, when we find ourselves struggling to cope with the stresses and tensions of ‘modern living’.

A second viewpoint regarding still waters is one connected with the depth of understanding and competency we have amassed in a particular area of our life. Possibly we have mastered a skill and are now able to undertake it unconsciously. Our effort flows as if it were an extension of ourselves.

Thirdly, “Still waters run deep” goes the cliché. Yet, as with most overused expressions, there is an element of truth to support its popular message. The currents of a situation may be invisible to the eye, especially if we are distracted by the surface calmness. However, it is dangerous to assume there is no turbulence below. As ever, holding back from making snap judgements ensures we are not caught out by the still waters we encounter day by day.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: