Noticing patterns

Noticing patterns on ceramics

 

Without being observant it is difficult to engage in the practice of noticing patterns amid events and occurrences. The necessity to be both physically and mentally present is clear.

Noticing patterns implies we are able to bring together various distinct inputs and, with a capacity to see beyond the immediate, make out a form or trend from the items. In a sense it is a way to foresee future situations as, by noticing patterns, we are anticipating their actual development.

Noticing patterns can also be a skill we use to bring into being new solutions to as yet undisclosed needs. Looking forward then backwards with an eye to merging ‘what will be’ with ‘what could be’ brings forth the opportunity for inventions to come into existence.

On a daily basis, however, noticing patterns is something we might undertake as we recognize the impact of past mistakes.

To improve results we will need to work on amending our habits. Taking our effort as a constant, the variable component of an outcome is our action. If we fail to change this, then nothing is likely to alter.

Noticing patterns along these lines is, of course, only beneficial to the extent we act on our observations.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

2 Responses to Noticing patterns

  1. Mongezi says:

    Really enjoyed your perspective on this subject

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