Are we resonating with the world around us?

January 7, 2018

 

Streets around us

Questions leading to a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answer leave little space for in-depth reflection. Yet in certain cases, our answer is clear to us and we are able to cope without the benefit of such pondering. The inquiry ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ cuts to the core of our outlook, deserving a few words here.

With our goals set, plans in place and efforts focused, it is easy to be unconcerned with anything attempting to distract us from our endeavour. At such times, we offer a resounding ‘No’ to the query ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ We are ‘in the zone’ and able to ignore everything else.

Still, even when we are concentrated on achieving this or that, our presence and awareness is part of the world around us. Resonating with it – without getting wrapped up in events and situations we have little or no control over – is an option worth, at least, evaluating.

As ever, other perspectives are available to us. Spending a few moments exploring these could change our response to the initial question ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent will this matter tomorrow?

January 4, 2018

Dark clouds

 

One way we can keep things in perspective is to ask ourselves “To what extent will this matter tomorrow?” In a world changing faster than ever it seems, this simple enquiry may just keep us connected to what is really important.

Pondering the question ‘To what extent will this matter tomorrow?‘ and then listening attentively to our response ensures present efforts are fully focused on priorities.

Being guided by a structured programme, albeit with an element of flexibility incorporated into it most likely, helps us to reach our objectives.

To what extent will this matter tomorrow?” For many, who operate according to the concept of giving proverbial oil to whatever door squeaks the loudest, the response is perhaps “It probably won’t.”

Doing this or that in a haphazard fashion invariably saps energy, rendering any output mechanical and listless at best.

That said, many things we are dealing with now will matter tomorrow. Though overused, the saying “We are building tomorrow today” holds true.

To explore the challenges, choices and/or opportunities you are currently facing as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout, get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this To what extent will this matter tomorrow? post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation

December 28, 2017

Chips as a simple pleasure

 

A whole host of things may come to mind when pondering simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation. Eating chips on the pier is only one possibility. Naturally, we all get to define what is meant by ‘moderation’ as each of us has our own ideas about such things.

Right now, putting down the snack, I’ll limit the list of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation to just two.

The first of the two simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation is that of spending quality time in the company of people we feel totally at ease with and who, in their turn, feel equally comfortable with us. This is something so basic yet overlooked perhaps over the year as goal chasing and the like occupy our attention.

We might say we are working for these people and are busy for their sake but, without actually spending time in their company, our efforts possibly appear hollow at best. Giving them our time is probably more appreciated than any tangible objects offered to them as substitutes for our actual presence.

The second item on the list of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation is that of getting outside to embrace nature in whatever format is most appealing to us. This could be a walk, a run, a cycle ride or any other form imaginable. The advantages of ‘blowing away the cobwebs’ will be felt immediately and can last for ages.

To share your input on the issue of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?

November 30, 2017

Leaves

 

With all that is occurring around the world, the collective answer to the inquiry “To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?” could easily be something akin to “Greatly”.

However, the response of the majority masks, in a way, the voice of the individual. Each of us has a personal interpretation of current times. We probably base our feelings not only on whatever is around us but also on how well we are progressing towards our objectives, whilst living our potential along the path.

Certainly frustrations, challenges and the like form part of any endeavour. Nevertheless, if we think about our major triumphs to date we will surely note they were achieved despite the presence of difficulties. We coped then and we can do it again.

From this proactive perspective, as we go about doing and being our best, we may respond individually “Not at all” to the question “To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?

If you’d like to share your thoughts on the ideas put forward here, please feel free to leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Was yesterday really better than today?

November 2, 2017

Picture of yesterday

 

It is often said by ‘those in the know’ that the past offered more opportunities, less stress and endless hours of enjoyment yet, honestly, was yesterday really better than today?

How we actually determine the answer to this question “Was yesterday really better than today?”, and I am not sure any response would hold up to a ‘scientific investigation’, is a matter of personal interpretation.

It is not unusual for us to cherry-pick particularly pleasant and enjoyable moments from our memories. We recall relatively easily those occasions we lived fully and achieved success in any area of life we wish to think about. Positive peak moments invariably push negative events into a secondary position.

In all probability, yesterday, as today, contained a variety of ‘good’, ‘bad’ and ‘neutral’ moments. Was yesterday really better than today? Most likely no. Past successes are remembered without recalling the effort required to achieve them and the many setbacks encountered prior to reaching them.

Today, on the other hand, is so present in our minds it is perhaps difficult to evaluate objectively the day without focusing on all the commitments and tasks still needing to be dealt with. Giving our all now, in any case, sets us up to look back tomorrow upon today with a sparkle in our eyes.

Let me close by asking again “Was yesterday really better than today?” To share your thoughts, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Watching the waves of the moment crash around us

October 26, 2017

Waves crashing around us

 

It is never easy to remain unmoved whilst watching the waves of the moment crash around us. We might be tempted to flee the scene, leave the difficulties and seek out a safer environment.

Watching the waves of the moment crash around us, however, can also be read as a method of being conscious of the present situation as we navigate difficulties to reach our objective. Awareness is coupled with and aligned to our movement towards the goal.

With a wider vision of the day, we could see patterns stretching back from the past to today. These forms perhaps offer insight into how we should interact mindfully with the present, as opposed to merely reacting mindlessly, whilst watching the waves of the moment crash around us.

Solutions are available in terms of finding a way through seemingly chaotic circumstances if looked for. Their significance is, as ever, individual to the person undertaking the exercise of watching the waves of the moment crash around us. And beliefs, hopes and fears add to or subtract from how we perceive things.

Energy and attention are, in any case, heightened during moments of intense upheaval. Clarity is many times found even as folk around us appear confused. Our needs and focus guide us towards outcomes, despite or because we are watching the waves of the moment crash around us.

If you would like to share your input on the issue of ‘Watching the waves of the moment crash around us’, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Three benefits of the proverbial tea break

October 12, 2017

Tea pots

 

Upfront let me state the proverbial tea break could just as easily be read as a coffee break or even a cigarette break if that is your thing. We don’t need to worry unduly about the nature of the break when looking at three benefits of the proverbial tea break.

Thinking about three benefits of the proverbial tea break, we can list some general points, potentially appropriate to everyone. Specific advantages will, of course, be found on an individual basis according to the exact dynamics of the undertaking each of us is engaged in.

First of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

The actual object of the break – tea, coffee, cigarette, and so forth – brings with it a refreshing interruption to the flow of the day. Once reinvigorated we are ideally able to better face anew the challenges before us, perhaps with a new perspective available to us as a result of having taken onboard some ‘energy’.

Second of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

By taking a pause, we give ourselves the opportunity to step away from an endeavour or task to clear our head for a few minutes. A brief walk to the tea room, vending machine or smoking area gets the circulation going and this itself might be beneficial to us especially if our work involves much time at a desk.

Third of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

Breaks, even those of a short duration, provide an occasion to change the scenery and possibly interact with different people for a few minutes. It may be considered a form of networking and underlines the social element of life, also within a work setting.

If you’d like to share your thoughts on this ‘Three benefits of the proverbial tea break’ post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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