Three benefits of the proverbial tea break

October 12, 2017

Tea pots

 

Upfront let me state the proverbial tea break could just as easily be read as a coffee break or even a cigarette break if that is your thing. We don’t need to worry unduly about the nature of the break when looking at three benefits of the proverbial tea break.

Thinking about three benefits of the proverbial tea break, we can list some general points, potentially appropriate to everyone. Specific advantages will, of course, be found on an individual basis according to the exact dynamics of the undertaking each of us is engaged in.

First of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

The actual object of the break – tea, coffee, cigarette, and so forth – brings with it a refreshing interruption to the flow of the day. Once reinvigorated we are ideally able to better face anew the challenges before us, perhaps with a new perspective available to us as a result of having taken onboard some ‘energy’.

Second of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

By taking a pause, we give ourselves the opportunity to step away from an endeavour or task to clear our head for a few minutes. A brief walk to the tea room, vending machine or smoking area gets the circulation going and this itself might be beneficial to us especially if our work involves much time at a desk.

Third of three benefits of the proverbial tea break

Breaks, even those of a short duration, provide an occasion to change the scenery and possibly interact with different people for a few minutes. It may be considered a form of networking and underlines the social element of life, also within a work setting.

If you’d like to share your thoughts on this ‘Three benefits of the proverbial tea break’ post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Appreciating the passing of time

September 21, 2017

Passing clouds

 

For some people, it is almost impossible to go about appreciating the passing of time. These folk perhaps feel they have so much to do with so few hours available to them, therefore time is be grasped onto tightly. Unfortunately acting in this way diminishes the pleasure of its passing and underlines, even more, the passing nature of time itself.

Appreciating the passing of time is an exercise we can undertake as part of a wider exploration into our relationship with impermanence. Given everything passes, we should possibly be open to the idea of not being able to either stop time or conserve it for later.

Using time wisely, on the other hand, is something we could and, dare we say, ought to learn to do. Our definition of wise will depend on our own situation, yet we need not reach the end of the day thinking ‘Where has the day gone?’ Looking back on the things accomplished would be a better way to end the day.

Appreciating the passing of time may be accompanied with a review of the manner we have developed over the course of the years. As youngsters, days were probably viewed as being endless as we faced life with optimism and hope. Today time is at a premium. As such, we attempt to focus on efforts to greater levels and undertake assignments attached to our objectives as opposed to those of others, or then again not.

To share your input on the issue of ‘Appreciating the passing of time’, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How our surroundings impact on us

September 17, 2017

Surroundings impacting on us

 

To discover how our surroundings impact on us we might wish to first explore where we are exactly right now.

Rather than being in the location shown in the picture, I am drafting this sitting in one of the staff rooms at the university in Milan. The furnishings and fixtures all mirror the status of the institution. As colleagues go about their business around me, I am letting the pencil dance across the A4 notebook I use to capture ideas for these posts.

It is possible you are reading this whilst on the move. The people around you may be strangers to you or folk you know well. The location is ideally pleasant and perhaps also creatively stimulating, depending on the nature of what you are doing there.

How our surroundings impact on us then perhaps is much to do with how we feel where we are and linked closely to the objects and the people there with us.

We are, in any case, capable of blocking out the world and ignoring our senses to focus fully on a matter irrespective of our locality. In these instances ‘How our surroundings impact on us’ is no longer a valid exploration as we are immune, so to speak, from the surroundings and their influence on us.

Of course, the individual aspect of where we are renders any inquiry to how our surroundings impact on us personal to each of us. In any case, thanks for spending a few minutes of your time reading this ‘How our surroundings impact on us’.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Watching the crowd viewing the moment

September 3, 2017

Crowd viewing the moment

 

Watching the crowd viewing the moment might seem a strange activity to indulge in. After all, wouldn’t it be better to be doing something else or at least join the crowd viewing the moment?

Naturally, each alternative to watching the crowd viewing the moment will have its own advantages and it is for us individually to decide the most beneficial option, including that of watching the crowd viewing the moment.

Nevertheless, returning to the initial idea of watching the crowd viewing the moment, we can ponder the mechanics of the group and observe how the masses create their own dynamics in terms of embracing the present as it is or, possibly, in accordance with a mindset imposed by an authority figure.

From a detached position, we get to see all sides of human nature as well as the manner in which influence plays a part in managing groups and manoeuvring actions. Ideally, the intentions of those ‘behind the scenes’ are positive yet unfortunately, this is not always the case.

Emotions quickly spread, especially when folk are sharing an experience. It is likely we could come across expressions such as “We just got caught up in the excitement” and “It was as if time flew by.” Yet sometimes, we too may relate to these words whilst watching the crowd viewing the moment.

For now, thanks for connecting and reading this ‘Watching the crowd viewing the moment’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we benefiting by swimming in the moment?

August 31, 2017

Swimming in the moment sign

 

Many sources suggest we should be ‘mindful of the present’, ‘living in the moment’ and ‘doing just what everything consciously aware of right now’. Whilst this advice is all very relevant, we can ask to what extent are we benefiting by swimming in the moment?

The question ‘To what extent are we benefiting by swimming in the moment?’ may appear to imply a criticism of being in harmony with this actual time. However, for the sake of understanding better our situation, it is worth considering.

With attention focused on the now, it is likely we are able to manage easily items previously having the power to distract us from our priorities. Furthermore, fears about tomorrow and concerns hanging around from yesterday have little impact on us as we go about embracing today.

In these instances, we are surely benefitting greatly by swimming in the moment and, if nothing else, we are able to ideally save ourselves from stress and upset by putting aside the past and the future. To what extent are we benefiting by swimming in the moment? “Significantly”, we may answer.

As with any exploration of our habits, we should keep in mind the opportunity cost of something as well as the corresponding cost of not doing it. Being clear about the gains and losses associated with our actions helps us in responding to the inquiry ‘To what extent are we benefiting by swimming in the moment?

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Appreciating the past as richness of the present

August 6, 2017

Past riches

 

‘Shiny’ and ‘New’ certainly have their place in society even as we go about appreciating the past as richness of the present.

The kaleidoscope of the moment contains a variety of ideas, themes and input deriving from yesterday, today and in a certain sense also tomorrow. The value of the whole justifies the single pieces. Possibly, for this reason, we should engage in appreciating the past as richness of the present.

With built-in obsolescence ingrained in many items, it is difficult to imagine being able to propose a similar enquiry in say five hundred years with reference to today’s constructions and the like. Nevertheless, as stated before, all items – ancient, actual and who knows even future ones – add to the wealth of the present.

It is natural to move from merely appreciating the past as richness of the present to asking how to go about appreciating and using what we have without destroying it as we do so. The dilemma regarding public consumption and private conservation is perhaps best left to others as it falls outside the scope of this post.

In any case, being grateful for the efforts of long-gone artists who created so much beauty for us to still enjoy is potentially a way of appreciating the past as richness of the present.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?

July 16, 2017

Sunrise on tomorrow

 

Let’s be clear from the start by asking to what extent are we ready for tomorrow? we are assuming there will be a tomorrow. Usually I prefer to avoid assumptions, but in this case, I have made an exception. So, with fingers crossed and touching wood, I’ll let the supposition about tomorrow stand.

Two points spring to mind concerning ‘To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?

Firstly, the extent is important. Giving ourselves the maximum chance of obtaining a successful tomorrow depends on what we do today. Secondly, the matter is under our control and hence we will also be partly responsible for the resulting outcome too.

Preparing for an assignment or undertaking is a key element to being ready. Ideally, we set aside time to investigate what is required of us and then take the appropriate actions to acquire the relevant skills. Of course, this may mean a bringing together of existing items if the event is one we are pretty familiar with.

Should it be this inquiry about to what extent are we ready for tomorrow has stirred you to action today for tomorrow, and you’d like to explore options as part of a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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