Dismissing the negativity from around us

October 6, 2019

Without judging, we always have the option of dismissing the negativity from around us. Dealing with life’s challenges is certainly tough enough as it is without having to wade through the waters of negativity.

The action of dismissing the negativity from around us could involve this series of simple steps:

1) Clarify our definitions of positivity and negativity;

2) Set personal tolerance levels concerning what we are prepared to accept;

3) Remind ourselves of the life we are striving to create;

4) Refuse to let others dictate our mindset or outlook despite their behaviour or words.

Dismissing the negativity from around us goes a long way to ensure we face daily life in, at least, a neutral manner. And if some people resent or get offended by our position, well that is their problem rather than ours, no?

To share your input on the issue raised here, please leave a comment below. And feel free to like/share this ‘Dismissing the negativity from around us‘ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What should we do now?

October 3, 2019

 

Probably, we are never faced with the question ‘What should we do now?’ as our strategy for reaching heartfelt goals is written out to offer us guidance every step of the way forward.

There might be a certain amount of flexibility built into the plan, justifying a moment of questioning ‘What should we do now?’ But the answer will be at our fingertips instantly.

When people look to us for assistance with the words ‘What should we do now?’ our input will, ideally, be based on the best interests of all concerned. Being trusted to lead others is a responsibility as well as a privilege and requires careful handling.

Or not. As ever, please feel free to share your thoughts by leaving a comment below and don’t hesitate to like/share this ‘What should we do now?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Understanding what makes us tick

September 26, 2019

Understanding what makes us tick, what gets us out of bed in the morning and keeps us pushing through the day to reach our goals, is an important discovery.

By understanding what makes us tick, we have valuable information which can be used to our advantage when weighing up choices, requests on our time plus a whole host of other elements making up our day. Aligning tasks with our core values also ensures we are operating with authenticity at all times.

Yet understanding what makes us tick is not always a comfortable process. For many people, their routine is based on the whims and needs of loved ones and other significant members of their circle of influence. They avoid planning and goal setting, possibly for fear of not being able to live up to their ambitions.

And, of course, by not ‘testing themselves’ they never fail but then they never truly live their potential either.

Once we have gone about understanding what makes us tick, it is difficult to not, sooner or later, begin to want to live life in accordance with our ‘true self’. How this looks in practice will be as individual as we all are.

To explore the issue of understanding what makes us tick as part of a coaching conversation, please don’t hesitate to get in contact.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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The positive step of moving away from negative people

September 19, 2019

Maybe we can’t do all we would like to do in terms of building our desired life. Even so, there is one thing within our power to accomplish. We can take the positive step of moving away from negative people.

Of course, there will be people who, for whatever reasons, we are unable to exclude from our life. In these instances, the positive step of moving away from negative people might involve creating a mental space between ourselves and them.

We needn’t digest all their negativity. Learning to hear something without allowing it to influence our mindset is a skill worth acquiring. Letting go of gloom or, better yet, not picking it up in the first place, is our responsibility. And how we choose to engage with people says much about our outlook of the world.

Needless to say, we can extend the positive step of moving away from negative people to include news reports and the like.

To join the conversation on the issue of the positive step of moving away from negative people, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Seeing things as they are

September 12, 2019

Choosing to see things as we wish them to be is an option but so is seeing things as they are. Each has consequences.

The first may involve viewing life through rose-tinted lenses. The world is ours and our input keeps the world spinning. ‘Seeing things as they are’ offers a more balanced outlook. Some things are good, others bad and the majority probably neutral. And we are a piece of the world, not its owner.

For now, let’s focus on what it means to go about seeing things as they are. In the first instance, we have the possibility to use past experiences as learning points for the present and future. The positive and negative from what has occurred before can be added to our current thinking to provide depth.

When seeing things as they are we have the chance to evaluate various perspectives without worrying about being biased toward any one viewpoint. When a decision eventually needs to be made, we are able to use our impartial judgement coupled with personal objectives aligned with our values.

Seeing things as they are may, at times, require us to accept the discomfort that comes from embracing ‘what is’ rather than ‘what we would like’. Even so, we can take heart from knowing we are not deluding or cheating ourselves as we move along the path of life.

To share your thoughts on the issue of ‘Seeing things as they are’, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Letting values guide our actions

August 25, 2019

A client was talking recently about various opportunities on the horizon. It was evident he had worked hard to put himself into this advantageous position. The problem, now, was to choose a path forward. And the selection process was causing him anguish and frustration.

After exploring the pros and cons of each option, we stepped back from the rational discussion and, in silence, attempted to ‘hear’ what his intuition was telling him. As a family man, and with the wellbeing of his children uppermost in his mind, he quickly came up with what for him was the ‘best’ way ahead.

By letting values guide our actions we are tapping into an important resource, available to us when we give ourselves the time and mental space to use it.

It could have been quicker to go about ‘letting values guide our actions’ right from the start of the conversation. However, as a person accustomed to ‘logical thinking’, it is unlikely he would have accepted the suggestion without first undertaking his ‘usual’ steps in the decision-making process.

The important thing is he found his solution, albeit by ‘letting values guide our actions’.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How focused are we on what is really important?

August 11, 2019

Questions regularly crop up in these blog posts, so let’s continue the habit with this one: ‘How focused are we on what is really important?

Our answer to the inquiry ‘How focused are we on what is really important?’ will depend on our rapport with heartfelt goals, plus our ability to schedule priorities. Provided we are clear about what we want to achieve and base our endeavours on this, our focus will automatically be on what is really important to us.

At varying moments of the year, we may be obliged to spend time on matters not directly related to our core goals. Nevertheless, even in these instances, we need not lose sight of our overarching objectives.

There is no reason to be despondent just because we have to work on less strategic issues once in a while. And, provided it is only ‘once in a while’, we shouldn’t worry about not dedicating all our time to our key concerns. 100% remains the response to ‘How focused are we on what is really important?

Anyway, enough of my thoughts on the issue ‘How focused are we on what is really important?’ To share your input, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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