Looking back to look forward

December 3, 2020

As we enter into the final month of this ‘different’ year, looking back to look forward seems a worthwhile exercise. Noting the distance covered from where we began with our key objectives for 2020 and where we are now, gives us a perspective of our progress.

Setting aside the various obstacles we have had to face, and continue to do so in many instances, looking back to look forward offers us a moment of reflection, also regarding our attitude towards the objectives.

We know whether we have done everything in our power to reach this or that and, also if we are honestly willing to up our efforts in the case of not having hit the targets yet.

Furthermore, looking back to look forward, we are in a position to clarify what we desire for the coming months. Having this information puts us in a strong position to undertake associated actions. Choosing to use the input, remains, of course, something for each of us to decide.

Thanks for reading this ‘Looking back to look forward’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Giving ourselves permission to follow our heart

November 26, 2020

Without giving ourselves permission to follow our heart, it is unlikely we will ever do it.

Other people may encourage us to reflect on past successes and sometimes even on failures to establish strengths and weaknesses. Then there are folk who suggest we shouldn’t expect too much from “these trying economic times”.

Considering all this input, giving ourselves permission to follow our heart doesn’t seem too taxing in comparison. Listening to a variety of ideas is fine, provided we remember we are the experts on ourselves.

Ultimately, how we live life depends on our attachment to it and ‘giving ourselves permission to follow our heart’ is no worse a piece of advice than any other but, in all likelihood, much better than most.

To share your thoughts on this issue of giving ourselves permission to follow our heart, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being clear about what we do, and don’t do

November 22, 2020

So often these posts refer to the idea of being clear about what we do, and don’t do. And again today, this theme makes an appearance.

Of course, knowing or being clear about what we do, and don’t do, is all very well but worthless if not acted on. Providing clarity about our activities, refusing certain undertakings when necessary, is related to channelling time and effort.

After being clear about what we do, and don’t do, in terms of promoting ourselves, we can follow the words of Dan Lok, entrepreneur, mentor, motivational speaker, businessman and consultant: “Position narrow, reach wide”.

To explore your positioning as part of a coaching discovery session, get in contact.

Thanks for reading this ‘Being clear about what we do, and don’t do’ post, and please don’t forget to like and share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Moving from everything to something

November 12, 2020

Moving from everything to something implies we have taken the strategic step of channelling our efforts from the general to the specific.

Of course, moments change, and at times we need to juggle activities without completing any. Then again, if this style of work becomes the norm rather than the exception, it is difficult to maintain enthusiasm and motivation around key goals.

Moving from everything to something, on the contrary, underlines the importance of what we want to achieve and puts resources in place to ‘get things done’.

To explore the idea of moving from everything to something as part of a coaching discovery session conversation, get in contact.

Right now, thanks for reading this ‘Moving from everything to something’ post and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Thinking beyond the currently possible

November 1, 2020

Once we lift our eyes from the task taking up our energy, we can engage in thinking beyond the currently possible to see new opportunities.

Being busy is part of the identity of many people. However, if we fail to go about thinking beyond the currently possible, it is difficult to let our imagination guide us forward. Creativity needs input yes, but also space, time, and freedom from the shackles of the ‘currently possible’.

Thinking beyond the currently possible might turn out to be an exercise of confirming the present path as our best option. In such cases, discovering this won’t be a bad thing.

To join the conversation around thinking beyond the currently possible, leave a comment.

In the meantime, please don’t forget to like and share this ‘Thinking beyond the currently possible’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Using the minimum to get the maximum

October 15, 2020

Nowadays, news outlets are full of stories concerning the scarcity of resources. Economic pressures are the norm for many people. With this in mind, using the minimum to get the maximum seems a valid response to the moment.

However, instead of interpreting the notion of ‘using the minimum to get the maximum’ as a call to ‘just get by, we can think of the minimum as being the lowest level of excellence that, in any case, produces the best or maximum possible results.

In this context, using the minimum to get the maximum is all about awareness and how we appreciate rather than waste the time, energy and ability we have available for each activity.

Knowing ‘work expands to fill the time available’ (Parkinson’s Law), isn’t it better to be frugal with our resources such as time and use whatever is saved for more meaningful purposes?

To join the conversation here on the issue of using the minimum to get the maximum, leave a comment below.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Using the minimum to get the maximum’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Having clarity regarding intended benefits

October 11, 2020

It’s all very well rushing around, attempting to do this and that, but without having clarity regarding intended benefits, we risk being busy just for the sake of it.

Having clarity regarding intended benefits might motivate us to see endeavours through to their conclusion.

Knowing what we want to achieve, being able to ‘look into the future’ as it were, indicates a pathway to the intended benefits. Each step will, ideally, take us nearer to the desired destination.

Furthermore, we can use the presence of intended benefits to measure the success of our actions.

To share your input on the issue of having clarity regarding intended benefits, leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for connecting today and please don’t forget to like and share this ‘Having clarity regarding intended benefits’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?

October 4, 2020

In all likelihood, right now you are engaged in a project close to your heart. That said, are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?

Implementing a tactic could involve a series of pre-planned actions designed to obtain a precise result. It may even be part of a larger objective, one associated with an overarching strategy.

However, the implementation of a strategy can sometimes be less specific than the previously mentioned tactic. It creates the space, in a sense, for tactics to be undertaken.

A strategy often concerns the long-term, the so-called ‘Big picture’. Tactics, on the other hand, revolve around methods, ideally, ones tried and tested, to achieve something immediately, or at least in the short-term.

Being clear about whether we are endeavouring to execute a tactic or a strategy goes a long way to achieving our desired success. So, are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy? Feel free to leave your answer as a comment below.

In any case, thanks for reading this ‘Are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What would happen if we used productively each and every moment?

September 24, 2020

Yes, yet another post pushing the idea of being conscious of how we use/spend/invest/squander time. Today, let’s explore what would happen if we used productively each and every moment.

Firstly, we might complete tasks in a few minutes which initially looked as if they would take forever. Focusing our effort on one item, instead of spreading it across several activities, gives us the chance to ‘complete things’ rather than just ‘shuffle them around’.

Secondly, by being productive, we are demonstrating respect for time, and this could send a message to those who may have hoped to offload their assignments on us. Understanding the value of our time, and scheduling our priorities, will ensure we use it well.

And this could then give us time to engage in events and interests away from the proverbial desk, knowing we have concluded our duties for the day.

Thanks for reading this ‘What would happen if we used productively each and every moment?‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Adding life to life through our words

September 20, 2020

A simple way of brightening any day and enhancing the world around us is that of adding life to life through our words.

The words and expressions we choose to use – consciously selecting this or that – have the power to raise or beat down those who hear them. And we shouldn’t forget our words speak much about us, including our attitude and feelings towards people and objects.

By adding life to life through our words, we are taking responsibility for the environment in which we work and live.

Others may decide negative or aggressive language is okay for them. It’s their choice, but it doesn’t have to be ours too. Toxic speech is, as it were, the opposite to adding life to life through our words.

No?

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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