Trusting nature to fuel us forward

August 13, 2017

Nature as a source of fuel

 

Despite the idea of being proactive towards life being a constant feature of these posts, trusting nature to fuel us forward is an option surely worth exploring.

In terms of making progress, it could be argued ‘by any means available’ is a good perspective. Valid though this may be, the idea of trusting nature to fuel us forward here is more related to engaging with natural resources to help us face shared challenges as our individual thirst for energy increases relentlessly.

Over the years nature has been ripped apart to provide us with various sources of fuel. That we are now turning increasingly to so-called green options to safeguard nature seems only fitting. Harnessing the winds, waves and rays is a way of trusting nature to fuel us forward, without causing damage along the way.

Whether many countries follow this approach remains to be seen. For now, we can keep our fingers crossed and perhaps, just in case, turn off the light as we leave the room instead of merely expecting or trusting nature to fuel us forward as and when we demand it.

To share your thoughts on the issues raised here in this ‘Trusting nature to fuel us forward’ post, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What happens when clarity comes into view?

August 10, 2017

Clarity of view

 

It is all very well talking about wanting to see things clearly in order to get ourselves organised but what happens when clarity comes into view?

Prior to reaching this point, we might be actively engaged in development efforts or merely going through the motions by paying lip service to the idea of clarifying choices and so forth. Regardless of what occurred beforehand, however, what happens when clarity comes into view determines our next move.

It is difficult to pretend we are comfortable staying in the centre of our comfort zone – or routine so smoothing we are barely awake – once we have seen or experienced a compelling alternative with the clarity of who we are and how our potential can be realized.

Frustration is a strong motivator when connected to a bettering of ourselves for the sake of ‘living fully’ instead of ‘playing small’. Certainly, it is not always pleasant to hold onto a picture of clarity, especially when it is vastly different to the reality of the moment.

That said, it is up to the individual to ‘walk the path’ indicated by a clear vision of personal and professional objectives. Ideally, the journey will provide enjoyment and satisfaction with each step of the way, although as ever there are no guarantees.

Please feel free to get in contact if you’d like to explore the issue of what happens when clarity comes into view as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘What happens when clarity comes into view?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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From what perspective are you seeing today?

August 3, 2017

Perspective of colour

 

The answer you offer to the question ‘From what perspective are you seeing today?’ speaks volumes about how the day is going and indeed from where you are reading this.

When we are able to push past the immediate clouds of the day, the panorama before us could represent the opportunities we have, even if they were originally invisible to us. That they exist can help us in our efforts to actually see them and eventually embrace them.

Naturally, there will be times we need to give our full attention to a vision of today not fully to our liking. Whether related to work or any other obligation we have towards life, the outlook whilst not necessarily desired deserves our consideration.

So, from what perspective are you seeing today? How do you feel about whatever is before you? To what extent are you living the moment as opposed to merely passing through it? Your responses will possibly provide insight to help you manage not only today but also tomorrow.

In this instance, nevertheless, it is time to end this ‘From what perspective are you seeing today?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we focusing on the details of life?

July 30, 2017

Window cleaner

 

How we answer the question ‘To what extent are we focusing on the details of life?’ will in many instances depend on the moment and how we feel towards it.

To what extent are we focusing on the details of life? The details of life referred to may include, although not be limited to a) things to be undertaken, b) people around us and c) our objective leading to the carrying out or upholding of our desired lifestyle.

Looking at the inquiry from another perspective, it might be interesting to consider what captures our attention more than the details of life. We could be distracted by our hobbies, bemused by world events or even merely tired and looking to be left alone by everyone and everything.

Only we can answer ‘To what extent are we focusing on the details of life?’ for ourselves. We should not, no matter how much the so-called ‘others’ push us to do so, feel obliged to follow any path – including that of focusing on the details of life – unless we are convinced it is right for us.

How we live our life is an individual matter. The weight we give to various aspects of life is rarely easily put into words. We need not think we have to justify our approach to anyone, provided we respect all, operating within the law of the land.

Or possibly not. If you would like to join the conversation here and share your ideas, please leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent are we focusing on the details of life?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How to manage our daily outlook

July 20, 2017

 

Irrespective of where we are, what we are doing and even why we are doing it, learning how to manage our daily outlook will play a large role in the way we experience the day. The exercise, however, can last a lifetime or be completed in the blink of an eye.

As ever, the speed of acquisition is a personal matter. And clarity concerning the benefits associated with a managed daily outlook is perhaps the first step to developing this desirable skill.

We could think of a boat drifting without direction. Any wave, current or wind would move the vessel. Yet unless the destination is unimportant, such a journey appears pointless. In a similar fashion, our outlook is a point of reference for the flow of the day.

Asking ourselves how to manage our daily outlook opens the mind to reflection. We might discover in the process a certain propensity towards one or more specific methods.

Whether it be focusing on goals to the exclusion of all else around us or using our time as constructively as possible across a range of endeavours, we need to be comfortable with any eventual changes we wish or need to implement as a result of our efforts.

If you’d like to ponder how to manage your daily outlook as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘How to manage our daily outlook’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation

July 13, 2017

People working on the beach

 

It almost goes without saying that work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation. Depending on a) the location, b) type of employment and maybe above all else c) our attitude, what we are engaged to undertake can quite easily, from a different point of view, be considered as leisure.

However, we should not fall into the trap of thinking that just because work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation it is unimportant, a trivial pursuit and so forth. We may wish to make reference to the often quoted expression: “Take your work seriously, but yourself less so.”

Being employed to use skills, intuition and time is an important matter, deserving our full attention. Just because we might actually love what we do and gain pleasure from doing it – if you have to review books I guess you can do it just as well on the beach as in an office – does not mean it is not work.

In a perfect world, we would all be working in similarly pleasing positions, giving our all as we hold onto the idea that work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation. Though it is not so for everyone.

There is no reason, for the sake of offering a new twist on the issue why relaxation from another perspective could not be seen as work. How tiring is it to grab our place by the pool, ensure the tan is even and have sufficient reading material to last a whole day on the sun lounger?

For sure it is as taxing perhaps as commuting daily, standing in line for the lift, staring in despair at the hundreds of messages to be dealt with and on and on. Before this post takes an even sillier turn, let me stop.

Thanks, truly, for taking the time to read this ‘Work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How much do your habits mould who you are?

June 1, 2017

Moulded clay pots

 

Seeing our habits as clay shaped into a pot, ‘How much do your habits mould who you are?’ becomes a key component to looking at and even understanding how we are, as well as indeed where we are.

Taking this idea further, we should bear in mind pots sometimes crack, leak and, if necessary, are able to be remoulded to better serve our needs. How much do your habits mould who you are? Possibly the answer is: “As much as is beneficial to us.”

The question can be pondered with an emphasis on any areas of life, health and financial quickly spring to mind. How much do your habits mould who you are? If habits include smoking sixty cigarettes a day and religiously opting to take the car for even the shortest of journeys, it will surprise nobody if lungs feel clogged whilst pockets empty rapidly. Our choices, our consequences.

Rather than asking “How much do your habits mould who you are?”, we could decide to consider what life would be like with a) less restrictive habits and/or b) habits providing a lifestyle more attuned to heartfelt values.

Such a matter might best be explored as part of a complimentary coaching conversation via Skype or Google+ hangout. If you are interested, please get in touch.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘How much do your habits mould who you are?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained Co-Active Coach, and Freelance Trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

Publications

Heart Poems On Waves (2017)

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


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