Simplicity as an attitude

July 12, 2018

Simple landscape

A ‘Can do’ mindset is considered by many as being how we should all approach life and yet, if we are fair to ourselves, we know there are many approaches to living life including that of adopting simplicity as an attitude.

Provided we harm nobody and respect the laws of the land, our way of embracing life is an individual matter. Ideally, we live a lifestyle reflecting our personal values. Actions will be undertaken in alignment with our outlook and moral code of behaviour.

Mutual respect is key to having the freedom to determine the manner in which we operate in our connected world. Few of us dwell on a desert island, cast off from society. Accordingly, choosing simplicity as an attitude requires us to make choices to implement, maintain or enhance our desired lifestyle.

Whether incorporating every area of life or only certain aspects, simplicity as an attitude is valid to the extent it offers the individual concerned the benefits hoped for. Naturally enough, it is not an attractive option for everyone.

Being a fully-fledged member of the consumer society is in a sense the direct opposite to that of embracing simplicity as an attitude. With a multitude of variants between these two positions, we are encouraged to select a way of being appropriate to who we are and how we wish to be in the world today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Yes we are destroying our home

June 24, 2018

Trash in the sea

Sure it is a single picture, taken surreptitiously, but it suggests yes, we are destroying our home. Even so, we go through the pantomime of talking about quality control and rigorous standards for our food producers whilst we are polluting the sea, the air and the soil.

The damage plastic is doing to the oceans is common knowledge and yet, rightly perhaps in the spirit of freedom of choice, fish remains a popular food for many.

That we choose to breathe in horrendous amounts of harmful particles, instead of cutting back on our motorized vehicle usage, is another contradiction of the modern world.

All in all the outlook appears bleak as we ponder the reality that yes we are destroying our home.

Knowing things on a large scale change only after much time and discussion, we at least have the option to amend our behaviour with immediate effect. By opting for more beneficial alternatives and implementing a mindful approach to how we treat the environment we are doing our bit to stem the destruction.

Furthermore, our actions could be witnessed by others and become examples to replicate, thus spreading the efforts to counter the fact that yes we are destroying our home with our actual ways of being. That in itself would be another step forward.

Although I am sad it is necessary to write this post, I appreciate your presence here and thank you for reading this ‘Yes we are destroying our home’ rant today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Limited options limit our choice

June 14, 2018

Limited options on food stall

Focusing on the idea of how limited options limit our choice, we could look at why we fail to see numerous opportunities available to us at any moment.

So often we hold on tight to what we feel is the only option, or way forward, for us and in doing so lose sight of potentially more beneficial alternatives. There might be an element of fear responsible for our lack of courage to select new, untried, avenues open to us.

Doing what we have always done may not be getting us to where we say we would like to be but it is ‘safe’, ‘comfortable’ and ‘within our ability to manage’. ‘Playing small’ some may say in a judgemental manner.

Another factor restricting our vision is possibly our inability to put actual worries, fears and doubts into a perspective of reality. Rarely are challenges so pressing, so crucial, that we are obliged to renounce our good sense to deal with them immediately. And yet we do just that many times over.

Putting all our energy into sorting out the latest ‘squeaking door’ we forget to give attention to issues more likely to be advantageous to us in the coming future. ‘Limited options limit our choice’ or better ‘Poor priority management limits our future’.

With society fixated by the idea of ‘moving forward’, few find the strength of character or inclination to buck the trend and hit the pause button to review progress, plus the likely destination continuing with current efforts will lead towards.

Well, having pondered the idea that limited options limit our choice, I had better stop now. I hope the input here has, in some way, provided material for reflection. Thanks for reading this ‘Limited options limit our choice’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Remaining unmoved by the outlook

June 3, 2018

 

Inspiring outlook

I expect you know the type of people who, remaining unmoved by the outlook, are never enthusiastic about what is occurring around them.

Unless we are constrained by work or family ties, the best response we can offer these folk is space. Hanging out with Negative Nellies or Normans rarely does much for either ourselves or them. Remaining unmoved by the outlook, especially one we would normally be pleased to see, goes against who we are.

Sometimes it is suggested reality is about seeing the brutal aspects of the moment instead of focusing on the positive side of things. Without denying life contains testing moments, we should not overlook the fact it is a balancing act between ‘good’ and ‘bad’. And most events reside at the midpoint between these two extremes.

How we choose to acknowledge life remains, as ever, a personal matter. Breaking out into song when something touches our heart may be our preferred mode of expressing emotions. Then again, a simple smile might suffice. That others are remaining unmoved by the outlook is their choice.

If right now you feel moved to leave a comment below please do so. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Remaining unmoved by the outlook’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties

May 17, 2018

Fencing in countryside

How we may have come about feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties is a question best left for another time. In all likelihood, it is not as important as asking ourselves ‘What are we prepared to do to stop or reduce feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties?’

Understanding the extent to which we are willing to take responsibility for our outlook on life – including feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties – is a positive initial step to improving things.

Looking at the sensation of feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties, it is also useful if we start to see such items as a collection of individual issues instead of one big mass of problems.

There will be particular matters we have no option but to ‘Like it, lump it and get on with it’. Others may represent traditions passed on to us without us considering their ongoing validity for us.

So often we fall into line with those around us – family members, peers, colleagues and acquaintances – yet in doing so knock ourselves out of line with our own values.

‘This is just the way things are’ is a mindset of folk feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties. However, aligning actions to our priorities goes a long way to letting go of unfair demands, plus the sense of guilt associated with not completing everything asked of us. Or not.

To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, I hope this Feeling fenced in by tasks, habits and duties post has provided some food for thought.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Seeing beyond the moment

May 6, 2018

Building in the foreground

Aware of the extent we are actually wrapped up in whatever is going on around us, we have the choice to engage in a spot of seeing beyond the moment. It might be both surprising and rewarding to connect with something more than the immediate.

Whilst we remain involved in ongoing events, seeing beyond the moment gives us a glimpse of a wider picture. In all likelihood, it will be a vision attuned to our long-term strategic goals as opposed to those of others or possibly our own short-term tactical objectives.

Yet it would be unwise to dismiss completely ‘the now’ for ‘the later’. After all, actions undertaken today could well be the foundations for our desired tomorrow. As ever, clarity of purpose and a keen sense of our values can guide how we live.

If you would like to invest an hour of your time in a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout, perhaps to explore further the idea of seeing beyond the moment, please get in contact with me.

Thanks for reading this ‘Seeing beyond the moment’ post, I hope it has provided some proverbial food for thought.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Not fooled by the glitter and sparkle

April 29, 2018

Sparkling bracelets

Given you are reading this rather than a celebrity gossip site, it is fair to suggest you are not fooled by the glitter and sparkle of instant gratification.

Nowadays it seems we are obliged to be constantly choosing where to direct our attention. Perhaps this has always been the case, yet things seem to have multiplied with the ubiquitous online presence of us all. Managing our focus, being not fooled by the glitter and sparkle, is a crucial part of any day as such.

With so many notices designed to catch our eye the effort to be not fooled by the glitter and sparkle and thus distracted from our goal is no easy matter. Curiosity is natural and resisting the crafted messages of marketers is almost a job in itself.

Of course, there will be occasions in which the glitter and sparkle live up to the hype. Whether we decide to pursue a policy of seeking that moment is a personal issue. Only we can decide how much time to set aside to follow up ‘Special offers’, ‘Limited offers’ plus ‘End-of-line offers’.

For now, let me thank you again for being here and choosing to read this ‘Not fooled by the glitter and sparkle’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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