Being in contact

April 21, 2019

Being in contact could be summed up by the idea that we are all connected 24/7, attached to our phones or similar devices, glued to the screen displaying this and that.

As much as this definition might be true for some people, I imagine for the majority of us the reality in terms of ‘being in contact’ is somewhat different. In a similar fashion to any aspect of our life, we have the opportunity to choose our level of availability towards those who wish to reach out to us.

Being in contact does not automatically infer being in contact at any hour. If we decide to offer such accessibility, the chances are it is probably to an exclusive group of people, perhaps consisting of loved ones rather than clients or mere online acquaintances.

The benefits of being in contact on our terms are numerous, including in no particular order: a sense of balance, freedom to engage deeply as opposed to superficially, opportunities to operate aligned with priorities plus a feeling of empowerment concerning the management of technology.

To share your input on the issue of being in contact, please leave a comment, whenever you want, below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Living or going through the motions

April 7, 2019

It’s not fair to suggest the world can be divided into only two groups, those with people either living or going through the motions. In many instances, we switch happily from one category to another, possibly within the same hour at times.

Even so, there is an important difference between living or going through the motions. By living we could say we are being present and fully engaged with whatever task we are dealing with at this moment. Upsets from yesterday and concerns about tomorrow are not interfering with us as we go about living our potential.

Going through the motions implies a half-hearted performance, doing without being as it were. On occasions, this level of involvement might be satisfactory to those around us. Maybe our ‘going through the motions’ justifies similar behaviour from them.

No matter how common this ‘indifferent’ approach is, it does not change the fact we are invariably missing out on life when we are indulging in merely going through the motions.

To explore the issue of living or going through the motions as part of a coaching conversation, feel free to get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Living or going through the motions’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Offering value in addition to a saving

March 31, 2019

Whenever the ads appear for the Sales linked to various times of the year, it is likely some people wonder whether retailers are offering value in addition to a saving.

Obtaining more of this or that merely because it is cheaper today than yesterday is not always a wise action. Each person will, quite rightly, have his or her outlook on this matter of offering value in addition to a saving, but let’s just mention two generic points here.

1) Sometimes more doesn’t equate to greater satisfaction. With certain foods, the pleasure derives from ‘enjoying a treat’ rather than being able to ‘binge’ whenever the desire hits us. In the Northern Hemisphere, strawberries are for June rather than Christmas, no?

2) Cheap is not always the same as useful. If we buy something only because it is on sale yet we have no use for the item concerned, the manufacturer is hardly offering value in addition to a saving.

Regardless how we look at it, when nobody is offering value in addition to a saying, things are reduced to a question of price and the path to the bottom is, poetically speaking, littered with trash.

Thanks for connecting here today and taking the time to read this ‘Offering value in addition to a saving’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Are economics or values guiding your actions?

March 3, 2019

Are economics or values guiding your actions? Before we dig into this question, let’s look at what we mean by economics and values.

Loosely speaking, economics could be any intention or action associated with gaining monetary benefit. ‘Give to get back’, ‘Offer this or that as a loss leader with the aim of obtaining a return later on’, and so forth.

Even without referring to Gordon Gekko’s ‘Greed is good’ philosophy, the importance of money is clear to us all in our consumer-driven world.

Values, on the other hand, represent our personal approach to life. Though we may not always follow their input, their presence in our heart is always perceived.

So, are economics or values guiding your actions? Are you in it ‘just for the money’ or is there something else moving you forward?

We live life on our own terms and, in essence, there is no right or wrong answer to the question ‘Are economics or values guiding your actions?

Sometimes, however, it is good to talk through such enquiries. To schedule a coaching conversation, just get in contact.

For now, thanks for connecting here today to read this ‘Are economics or values guiding your actions?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Privileges disguised as duties

February 24, 2019

Thinking about privileges disguised as duties, a whole host of items might come to mind.

Our perspective on our routine determines how we consider many activities. Courtesy visits to established clients or elderly relatives may appear as regular events yet they provide structure to the week. And if they stop, for whatever reasons, we could discover the extent to which they were privileges disguised as duties.

In a similar fashion, the daily interaction we have with colleagues, clients, friends and family can also be viewed as being privileges disguised as duties. What at first appears as a ‘normal’ occurrence is soon missed when cancelled as a result of a change of circumstances and so forth.

Other examples of privileges disguised as duties are specific to your life. Appreciating them today, in many respects, will go a long way to making the week seem more manageable and maybe, just maybe, add a new dimension to your outlook on life.

If you’d like to explore your attitude to privileges disguised as duties as part of a coaching conversation, please get in contact.

Thanks for reading this ‘Privileges disguise as duties’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Results arrive from actions, not wishes

February 13, 2019

Even if we don’t like it, results arrive from actions, not wishes. Certainly, planning and preparation have their parts in any successful endeavour, yet efforts bring accomplishments.

It can be argued we need to base eventual actions on wishes. And surely those felt in the heart will have particular significance to us. Few would deny this observation. But we still need to add input into the mix to reach goals so, yes, results arrive from actions, not wishes.

Looking at the issue from a different perspective, one related to the idea of collaboration, things begin to take on a new dimension. Within any workgroup or team, it is essential each person is not only clear about his or her role but also understands what is expected in terms of individual undertakings.

General indications or vague instructions are, at best, going to slow down the march toward shared objectives.

Clear communication coupled with a precise division of responsibilities goes a long way in assisting all to give their best in the manner most appropriate to bring about success. Once again, results arrive from results, not wishes.

To share your input concerning success, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Results arrive from actions, not wishes’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Failing to do our work

February 10, 2019

Failing to do our work might trigger any number of reactions from those who rely on our output.

1) Failing to do our work can create fear and concern from folk who depend on our efforts to complete tasks in which they are involved.

2) Failing to do our work may initiate an overall decline in productivity, especially if resources need to be shifted around to compensate for our inactivity.

3) Failing to do our work could be the proverbial straw to break the camel’s back, providing the final excuse to have our position taken from us by those above us.

And so on and so on. However, failing to do our work is most likely something we never think about so I will leave you now as you continue with your daily routine.

If you’d like to explore the issue of commitments, tasks and duties as part of a coaching conversation, feel free to get in contact.

Thanks for reading this ‘Failing to do our work’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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