Knowing what we do not know

January 9, 2020

Focusing on our strengths, operating to the best of our abilities, is one thing, yet knowing what we do not know is also part of our personal development.

From the perspective of being able to evaluate our position to ensure subsequent actions are aligned to values and goals, knowing what we do not know is a crucial factor.

Awareness of our knowledge gaps allows us to ponder their impact on our performance and, if necessary, plan strategies to overcome the issues.

Aspects of our skill set in which we are scarce, yet have no relevance to our present or expected future activities, can probably be ignored in the short term. Knowing what we do not know gives us this insight. In such a way, our efforts are directed on only strategic matters.

Exploring the situation for the sake of optimizing one’s potential could be part of a coaching conversation. If you would like to discuss this option, get in contact.

In any case, thanks for reading this ‘Knowing what we do not know’ reflection and please feel free to like and share this post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Moving onto a bigger stage

January 5, 2020

The new year may have brought with it exciting opportunities and the occasion to consider moving onto a bigger stage of work and life.

Whatever the nature of the project resulting in us moving onto a bigger stage, we bring to it all of our accrued experience and competencies. The challenge might appear daunting yet we should not forget that:

a) Previous endeavours probably made us feel equally nervous but we survived them and grew;

b) Moving onto a bigger stage suggests we have demonstrated sufficient ability to justify this promotion;

c) Like us, others before us had to grow into their positions. Nobody is born with all the skills required to do a particular job. We have to engage in ongoing development, even as we go about moving onto a bigger stage.

At times, talking through fears and doubts can help with the adjustment to changing situations. To set up a coaching conversation, don’t hesitate to get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Moving onto a bigger stage’ post and please feel free to like and share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Understanding our strengths and weaknesses

December 8, 2019

Understanding our strengths and weaknesses is often the starting point for many development sessions. This basic exploration shows us what we should be consolidating, improving and so forth.

The process of understanding our strengths and weaknesses may require a full-scale appraisal involving a 360-degree evaluation, personal SWOT analysis or indeed any number of other tools. The important point, however, is for us to be honest with ourselves as the results can provide key input for our growth.

Regardless of how we go about understanding our strength and weaknesses, remembering a couple of key points is crucial.

Firstly, we are making this inquiry for the sake of obtaining information to better ourselves. Judging ourselves unfairly or too harshly offers no advantages.

Secondly, when going about understanding our strengths and weaknesses, the investigation is personal. Any comparison we choose to make should be between where we are and where we could or would like to be, instead of with others who have their own skill sets.

To explore the notion of ‘understanding our strengths and weaknesses’ as part of a coaching conversation, please get in contact.

For now, thanks for being here and please like and share this ‘Understanding our strengths and weaknesses’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Disturbances designed to derail our efforts

November 28, 2019

To be fair, disturbances designed to derail our efforts are only doing their job when they upset our schedules.

We all have any number of means available to us to disrupt our good intentions. Procrastination, an unwillingness to commit to actions or indeed a lack of connection with the task before us, could be at the heart of eventual disturbances designed to derail our efforts.

These ‘internal’ issues are, in theory, under our control and need to be managed sooner rather than later if we are to move forward with our agenda.

Some other disturbances designed to derail our efforts might relate to the ‘external’ environment we find ourselves in. In these instances, we will need to demonstrate our ability to limit their negative impact on us.

But, without wishing to become a disturbance to you, let me stop now. Thanks for being here and please feel free to like/share this ‘Disturbances designed to derail our efforts’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What benefits do we gain by working with a plan?

November 24, 2019

How we answer the question ‘What benefits do we gain by working with a plan?’ may depend to a great extent on our situation.

Nevertheless, a more generic response to the inquiry ‘What benefits do we gain by working with a plan?’ could involve some or all of the following items.

a) Seeing our desired result on paper motivates us to bring it into being.
b) Actions are designed to achieve specific results.
c) Each step takes us nearer to our key objective.
d) We don’t lose time wondering what to do next.
e) We eliminate the stress associated with having to decide what to do next.
f) We know where we are with the project at any moment.
g) We have a valid reason to refuse additional tasks if they are not part of the plan.

Probably you can think of more ways to respond when asked ‘What benefits do we gain by working with a plan?’ To share your input, please leave a comment below.

Thanks for reading this ‘What benefits do we gain by working with a plan?’ post and please do like/share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Gaining from unexpected opportunities

November 21, 2019

Gaining from unexpected opportunities is possible when we are flexible enough to embrace each situation as it is.

There will always be changes to deal with and projects invariably produce a surprise or two before their completion. Gaining from unexpected opportunities reflects a) our open approach to life and b) our desire to move towards goals despite the presence of extraordinary issues arising.

On the other hand, if we are so fixated on how we attempt to fulfil certain assignments, we might find it difficult to accept changes to our plans. In such instances, we would be unable to engage in gaining from unexpected opportunities even if they were advantageous to us.

As ever, how we view the moment, coupled with our ability to find a balance between how we perform this or that and the achievement of objectives, will impact on our eventual success.

To explore the question of gaining from unexpected opportunities as part of a coaching conversation, don’t hesitate to get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Gaining from unexpected opportunities’ post and please feel free to like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Communicating from the heart

November 10, 2019

It might be fair to suggest we are always communicating from the heart. After all, what value is there in any other form of communication?

That said, to underline the importance of communicating from the heart, let’s explore a few of the benefits we gain when we do engage in this practice.

Benefits of communicating from the heart.

1) Our words speak for us, with authenticity.

2) There is no dissonance between our intentions and our messages.

3) We invite others to communicate with us in a similar fashion, leading to open connections.

Undoubtedly, there are other advantages to communicating from the heart. If you’d like to join the conversation here with your input, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Communicating from the heart’ post and please feel free to like/share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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