Releasing the brake to live life to the full

September 17, 2020

Sometimes releasing the brake to live life to the full might involve a simple action. It could be:

a) Saying ‘Yes’ to our objectives, even if it means upsetting folk who are used to us running around for them;

b) Saying ‘No’ to an endless flow of requests we know in our heart has nothing to do with our goals;

c) Focusing on the benefits of a life lived to the full achieved by us ‘giving our all’;

d) Taking to heart the idea that even if we fail in our efforts, we can learn something and therefore ‘move forward’ to our heartfelt destination;

e) Appreciating that action is the starting key to accomplishing anything.

Releasing the brake to live life to the full could include additional actions. To share your thoughts on the issue and offer your input, leave a comment below.

Thanks for reading this ‘Releasing the brake to live life to the full’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Trusting ourselves despite our doubts

September 6, 2020

On the face of it, trusting ourselves despite our doubts could be a risky venture. Are we right? Are we merely telling ourselves we are right although we are wrong?

The reality may be found somewhere in the middle, even if from time to time we will be both right and wrong.

Nevertheless, trusting ourselves despite our doubts indicates a certain level of self-confidence. Possibly it was born from knowing ourselves and how our intuition usually is an excellent guide for our actions.

Doubts come and go. Listening to each one of them would most likely impede us from ever doing anything. Knowing this adds weight to the argument for trusting ourselves despite our doubts.

A rational assessment of the chances of our doubts turning out to be well-founded is also an option.

But again, it is ‘normal’ to feel a certain level of hesitation or doubt before moving forward with an undertaking. Trusting ourselves despite our doubts puts such feelings into perspective, in addition to showing faith in our preparation and abilities.

And as we ponder the idea of trusting ourselves despite our doubts, let’s not forget our ingrained desire to give our best no matter what, no?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Through coaching, training and writing, Brian works mainly with motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Can general intentions lead to specific goals?

August 27, 2020

Wanting to achieve an objective, perhaps even taking the time to set out a timeline for it, is something we are able to connect with. But then, for a million different reasons the enthusiasm we initially felt for it drains away.

This could lead us to ask the key question ‘Can general intentions lead to specific goals?’ Without taking those general intentions and breaking them down into doable action steps, our effort quickly gets lost, redirected, or consumed in other activities.

Possibly on occasions, we get lucky and achieve a particular goal without really spending time on reaching it. These instances, however, are usually the exceptions, not the norm. So, can general intentions lead to specific goals?

What do you think? To share your answer to ‘Can general intentions lead to specific goals?’ feel free to leave a comment below.

Right now, thanks for taking the time to read this ‘Can general intentions lead to specific goals?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Through coaching, training and writing, Brian works mainly with motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Ask yourself, ask us, and ask the marketplace

August 16, 2020

There are many reasons we might hold back from asking for this or that.

Some of the typical motives for failing to ask include:

a) Not knowing that we can ask;
b) Being afraid to be rejected;
c) Unsure who we should ask;
d) Being unclear about what we want;
e) Believing we are not worthy of receiving anything;
f) A misplaced sense of independence.

Understanding the answer is always ‘No’ when we fail to ask, it could be a good moment to get into the habit of asking to eventually receive the desired ‘Yes’.

So ask yourself, ask us, and ask the marketplace. Possibly the practice will feel strange at first, but in time you may discover life is more accommodating than you believed beforehand.

To share your input on the ideas raised here in this ‘Ask yourself, ask us, and ask the marketplace’ post, leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Through coaching, training and writing, Brian works mainly with motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Going beyond ‘wanting’ to reach ‘having’

August 13, 2020

It’s all very well, as they say, to know what is driving us forward. But going beyond ‘wanting’ to reach ‘having’ requires action in addition to knowledge.

Putting energy, movement, passion even, into endeavours is more likely to get us our desired outcomes quicker than merely hoping. Going beyond ‘wanting’ to reach ‘having’ in such instances propels us towards success.

Possibly the line between ‘wanting’ and ‘having’ is wafer-thin. In any case, it needs to be crossed if we are to gain the prizes.

So, thinking about where you are right now, what do you need to implement, change, or put into being to ensure you are going beyond ‘wanting’ to reach ‘having’? Will you do what is necessary? By when? And if not, what do you learn from that?

Thanks for reading this ‘Going beyond ‘wanting’ to reach ‘having’’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Through coaching, training and writing, Brian works mainly with motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Would you work for you?

August 9, 2020

Regardless of our employment status or official role, our approach towards others impacts on how we live each day.

Some folk suggest people reflect how they perceive us with their attitudes. Certainly, a smile often produces a smile in return, or a look of confusion depending on the setting. In any case, to what extent are we demonstrating an open, friendly approach to those we encounter?

If this inquiry leaves us unsure about how we interact with those around us, we could ask simply ‘Would you work for you?’ Do we come across as being the type of person we’d like to be employed by? Do we consider ourselves as caring individuals or aggressive taskmasters?

Pondering the question ‘Would you work for you?’ might produce valuable input, beneficial to ourselves and eventually to everyone else too.

Thanks for reading this ‘Would you work for you?’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

P.S. So, would you work for you?

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Making meaningful connections in a noisy marketplace

July 30, 2020

Just because we can, in theory, connect with everyone nowadays, doesn’t mean we have to. Making meaningful connections in a noisy marketplace is likely to be more:

a) Authentic;

b) Beneficial to all parties;

c) Constructive in terms of time usage.

After making meaningful connections in a noisy marketplace, we have the chance to take conversations away from the hustle and bustle of social media platforms to engage in deeper discussions in a more relaxing setting.

Yes, making meaningful connections in a noisy marketplace could be considered ‘Old School’. However, why should we throw out past strategies if they remain valid in the present and offer growth for the future?

Thanks for stopping by today, and please don’t hold back from liking and sharing this ‘Making meaningful connections in a noisy marketplace’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Let’s not forget to follow up hoping with action

July 9, 2020

On the face of it, the advice ‘let’s not forget to follow up hoping with action’ is probably unnecessary. If we are hoping for something, it seems natural to undertaken whatever we can to bring into being.

That said, how many times have we identified a desired outcome or solution but then failed to do anything to take ourselves to it.

So, yes, let’s not forget to follow up hoping with action. Although there are few guarantees concerning our efforts leading us to where we want to go, doing nothing rarely takes us forward.

Or not. To share your input on ideas set out today, leave a comment below.

In the meantime, I appreciate your presence here, and please don’t hesitate to like and share this ‘Let’s not forget to follow up hoping with action’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio

June 7, 2020

When evaluating the impact of any endeavour, we can choose to consider the extent to which we offered value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio.

Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ might be thought of as a benchmark to measure our actions. Are we delivering on these key indicators? How could we increase our efforts to enhance one, two, or all three elements?

As a point of reference, ‘Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ could be one of the most powerful. Few would want to engage with a service provider if they felt such things were missing in the interaction.

Setting these ideas out as proverbial food for thought, thank you for being here today. Please feel free to like and share this ‘Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What positives will you take from your last failure?

June 4, 2020

Being human, we all make mistakes and from time to time are unsuccessful in our attempts to do this or that. Accordingly, what positives will you take from your last failure?

Putting aside a sense of frustration, annoyance and so on over the setback, pondering the question ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?’ can provide vital input to help you move forward with success in the future.

Furthermore, sometimes the so-called ‘failure’, despite our upset, might lead us to better opportunities than those seeming lost to us. Missing out on promotion could motivate us to finally quit a dead-end job and seek something more aligned with our values and heart, for example.

And, of course, there will be situations less dramatic than that. All the same, it is possible to take stock of our efforts to date from a new perspective when responding to the inquiry ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?

Thanks for stopping by here today. To share your input on the ideas raised here, leave a comment below.

And finally, please don’t forget to like and share this ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?’ post if you wish.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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