Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio

June 7, 2020

When evaluating the impact of any endeavour, we can choose to consider the extent to which we offered value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio.

Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ might be thought of as a benchmark to measure our actions. Are we delivering on these key indicators? How could we increase our efforts to enhance one, two, or all three elements?

As a point of reference, ‘Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ could be one of the most powerful. Few would want to engage with a service provider if they felt such things were missing in the interaction.

Setting these ideas out as proverbial food for thought, thank you for being here today. Please feel free to like and share this ‘Value, kindness and expertise: a winning trio’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What positives will you take from your last failure?

June 4, 2020

Being human, we all make mistakes and from time to time are unsuccessful in our attempts to do this or that. Accordingly, what positives will you take from your last failure?

Putting aside a sense of frustration, annoyance and so on over the setback, pondering the question ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?’ can provide vital input to help you move forward with success in the future.

Furthermore, sometimes the so-called ‘failure’, despite our upset, might lead us to better opportunities than those seeming lost to us. Missing out on promotion could motivate us to finally quit a dead-end job and seek something more aligned with our values and heart, for example.

And, of course, there will be situations less dramatic than that. All the same, it is possible to take stock of our efforts to date from a new perspective when responding to the inquiry ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?

Thanks for stopping by here today. To share your input on the ideas raised here, leave a comment below.

And finally, please don’t forget to like and share this ‘What positives will you take from your last failure?’ post if you wish.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Who sets the expense bar for your activities?

May 31, 2020

It is easy to understand there is a cost to all actions, but who sets the expense bar for your activities?

It can be useful to explore the extent of time, money, energy and effort required to succeed in any chosen operation or project. Perhaps we need to establish who sets the expense bar for your activities and also who is in charge of the budget.

In work-related matters, the answers might be clear. Yet what about when we are investing in development to gain competency in a new skill? Clarity concerning who sets the expense bar for your activities in this situation could provide valuable input to take you forward, or not.

To share your thoughts on the question of who sets the expense bar for your activities, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Creating processes then working them fully

May 24, 2020

Putting the basics in place is key to achieving anything and, by creating processes then working them fully, we are doing just that.

Systems, workflows and processes tested and tweaked to maximize results can save us time, energy and even money in certain instances. We don’t need to worry about how to face routine issues. By creating processes then working them fully we are operating in the most productive manner we know.

What’s more, creating processes then working them fully for day-to-day activities means we are better positioned to engage unexpected items as they crop up.

Having the discipline to map out best practices to guide us each day is another question. For now, thank you for reading this ‘Creating processes then working them fully’ post and I hope it has offered some food for thought.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Using the achievement of one goal to reach the next

May 21, 2020

Instead of returning to point A, as it were, when attempting to complete a new undertaking, we can go about using the achievement of one goal to reach the next.

And using the achievement of one goal to reach the next ensures we maintain a certain consistency in our efforts.

Although a new endeavour might require us to employ different skills than those needed before, we are, in any case, operating with momentum and maximizing the experience of past accomplishments to lead us forward.

Furthermore, keeping our focus on winning, we build our ‘success muscles’ by using the achievement of one goal to reach the next. For now, thanks for taking time away from your activities today to connect here.

To share your input on the issue of ‘Using the achievement of one goal to reach the next’, please leave a comment below plus don’t forget to like and share this post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being specific with our actions

May 17, 2020

Pick up any self-help manual or inspirational book and sooner or later we will come across the idea of being specific with our actions. That so many authors, leaders and mentors promote this point suggests it is worth, at least, exploring.

Being specific with our actions is opposite in thinking to the ‘hit and hope’ approach. Clarity of intention acts as a guide to how we prepare and implement activities aimed at producing predefined results.

Of course, there are few guarantees, but invariably success is built on the foundations of preparation, practice and being specific with our actions.

To explore the issue of being specific with our actions as part of a coaching conversation, get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Being specific with our actions’ post and please don’t hesitate to like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Finding creativity within our habitual workplace

May 3, 2020

Finding creativity within our habitual workplace is something we are most likely doing daily. We spend X amount of hours there and produce output ideally matching our potential.

Yet some of us might feel finding creativity within our habitual workplace is not part of our job description. Nevertheless, there is always an element of any occupation which can benefit from looking at things from an alternative, different and yes, creative, perspective.

Whether it means adding this or taking away that, or merely moving the desk to see out of the window, the choices are, however, only limited by our imagination.

The responsibility for finding creativity within our habitual workplace remains a personal one. What works for one person may provide no advantage to another. Even so, getting started is best done sooner rather than later.

To share your input on the issue of ‘Finding creativity within our habitual workplace’, please leave a comment below and feel free to like/share this post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What is keeping you from living your potential? Want to talk and be heard?

April 30, 2020

Without waffling, drawing out the issue or filling this post with unnecessary words, let me ask you two questions.

Question #1. What is keeping you from living your potential?

Question #2. Want to talk and be heard?

If you’d like to use your answer to Question #1 as the starting point of a coaching conversation, message me. You will be able to talk about your response and be heard.

Leaving you to ponder the two questions, thanks for connecting here to read this ‘What is keeping you from living your potential? Want to talk and be heard?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Why enjoyment is a success on the path to happiness

April 16, 2020

Okay, so we’ve clarified our life purpose, set out our goals and prepared a strategy for reaching our objectives but have we considered why enjoyment is a success on the path to happiness?

If yes, then in all probability we are finding pleasure in every step of our journey.

On the other hand, if we haven’t thought about why enjoyment is a success on the path to happiness maybe we are missing out on a possible source of motivation and indeed well-being for us.

To paraphrase Mary Poppins, finding the element of joy in all that we do lightens the tasks. And when we are able to connect to the delight of each moment we understand why enjoyment is a success on the path to happiness. The destination is the path and vice versa as the saying goes.

Thanks for taking the time to read this ‘Why enjoyment is a success on the path to happiness’ post and please don’t hesitate to like and share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Seeing beyond this moment

April 2, 2020

It is so easy to get wrapped up in what is occurring right now, yet seeing beyond this moment is crucial if we are to be effective as well as efficient.

One thing is to focus attention on our tasks today. Another is to be so concentrated we miss input from around us to help shape our tomorrow. Seeing beyond this moment might require us to block off time away from the routine activities to consciously let the mind wander.

Though difficult initially, training ourselves to let go of the idea we have to be busy at all times allows us to engage in seeing beyond this moment. And once we proverbially return to the now, our actions can have a greater impact, in the present and the future.

To explore how coaching could help you in seeing beyond this moment, feel free to get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for being here and please don’t hesitate to like and share this ‘Seeing beyond this moment’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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