Different titles, same issues

October 29, 2020

Different titles,
same issues. Maybe this proves
humans are alike.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Thanking from the heart

October 25, 2020

Thanking from the heart
is a powerful way of
being authentic.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Embracing freedom according to your definition of it

October 22, 2020

Ask ten people what freedom means to them and the answers might be creative, varied and possibly mind-blowing.

Once we delve into what it signifies for us, we may notice personal beliefs and considerations come into play. Embracing freedom according to your definition of it, is, let’s never forget, an activity just as valid as that of anybody else’s. Provided, that is, everyone’s human rights are respected.

Embracing freedom according to your definition of it is a proactive choice, as well as a life-defining action and one surely worthy of praise and respect. And this is true even if we don’t agree with another person’s definition of freedom.

Thanks for reading this ‘Embracing freedom according to your definition’ of it’ post. To share your thoughts on the issues raised, leave a comment below.

In any case, please don’t forget to like and share this ‘Embracing freedom according to your definition’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being inspired to inspire others

October 18, 2020

Being inspired
to inspire others is
a way to live life.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Using the minimum to get the maximum

October 15, 2020

Nowadays, news outlets are full of stories concerning the scarcity of resources. Economic pressures are the norm for many people. With this in mind, using the minimum to get the maximum seems a valid response to the moment.

However, instead of interpreting the notion of ‘using the minimum to get the maximum’ as a call to ‘just get by, we can think of the minimum as being the lowest level of excellence that, in any case, produces the best or maximum possible results.

In this context, using the minimum to get the maximum is all about awareness and how we appreciate rather than waste the time, energy and ability we have available for each activity.

Knowing ‘work expands to fill the time available’ (Parkinson’s Law), isn’t it better to be frugal with our resources such as time and use whatever is saved for more meaningful purposes?

To join the conversation here on the issue of using the minimum to get the maximum, leave a comment below.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Using the minimum to get the maximum’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Having clarity regarding intended benefits

October 11, 2020

It’s all very well rushing around, attempting to do this and that, but without having clarity regarding intended benefits, we risk being busy just for the sake of it.

Having clarity regarding intended benefits might motivate us to see endeavours through to their conclusion.

Knowing what we want to achieve, being able to ‘look into the future’ as it were, indicates a pathway to the intended benefits. Each step will, ideally, take us nearer to the desired destination.

Furthermore, we can use the presence of intended benefits to measure the success of our actions.

To share your input on the issue of having clarity regarding intended benefits, leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for connecting today and please don’t forget to like and share this ‘Having clarity regarding intended benefits’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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We can control our actions but not always the results

October 8, 2020

Yes, it’s a basic truth: we can control our actions but not always the results. That said, to what extent do we control our actions? If we aren’t doing this to the full, we have little right to consider attempting to manage the results.

Whether we refer to it as self-leadership or personal management, we can control our actions but not always the results. Accepting this gives us input to focus on all the elements of a situation we are engaging with. And with this channelling of attention and energy, we are ensuring we are doing all we are able to do.

To share your thoughts on the idea ‘we can control our actions but not always the results’, leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for connecting today and please don’t forget to like and share this ‘We can control our actions but not always the results’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?

October 4, 2020

In all likelihood, right now you are engaged in a project close to your heart. That said, are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?

Implementing a tactic could involve a series of pre-planned actions designed to obtain a precise result. It may even be part of a larger objective, one associated with an overarching strategy.

However, the implementation of a strategy can sometimes be less specific than the previously mentioned tactic. It creates the space, in a sense, for tactics to be undertaken.

A strategy often concerns the long-term, the so-called ‘Big picture’. Tactics, on the other hand, revolve around methods, ideally, ones tried and tested, to achieve something immediately, or at least in the short-term.

Being clear about whether we are endeavouring to execute a tactic or a strategy goes a long way to achieving our desired success. So, are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy? Feel free to leave your answer as a comment below.

In any case, thanks for reading this ‘Are you attempting to implement a tactic or a strategy?’ post, and please like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Are we showing our ‘best side’ or our ‘I know best’ side?

October 1, 2020

How we come across to others is not always easy to assess. We might think we are friendly, funny and helpful yet, for those we interact with, we may seem annoying and noisy, or even nosey. Likewise, being confident and assertive can, at times, be construed as arrogant and rude.

So, are we showing our ‘best side’ or our ‘I know best’ side?

Clarity regarding our perceived presence plays an important part in evaluating our overall performance at work and away from the proverbial coalface. Operating from a position of collaboration and inclusion does not, of course, guarantee we are showing our ‘best side’. However, in many instances, it reduces the number of times we slip into our ‘I know best’ mode.

To explore the question ‘Are we showing our ‘best side’ or our ‘I know best’ side?’ as part of a discovery session coaching conversation, get in contact.

Right now, thanks for stopping by here and please don’t forget to like and share this ‘Are we showing our ‘best side’ or our ‘I know best’ side?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being mean with our access and generous with our energy

September 27, 2020

Regardless of our status, giving others unlimited access to our days might lead to us being treated like doormats by everybody.

Being mean with our access and generous with our energy, on the contrary, is a strategy worth exploring.

Perhaps the word ‘mean’ is too strong here. But, in any case, each of us will attach our interpretation to it, so maybe it is not a big issue in the context of being mean with our access and generous with our energy.

That said, restricting access to our days, in person or via digital means, ensures we have the opportunity to ‘get things done’ as opposed to just ‘get through the day’.

But once we have decided, or are obliged in certain instances, to give access to someone, being generous with our energy is a powerful approach to life. By connecting with people in this manner, we are demonstrating we value them, without undervaluing ourselves.

Thanks for stopping by here today and please like and share this ‘Being mean with our access and generous with our energy’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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