Shutting up shop to take a break

December 17, 2017

Shops shutting up

 

Having pushed ourselves for most of the year to date it is perhaps natural that at this point we turn our attention to shutting up shop to take a break.

Ideally, we will have already reached our annual targets and consolidated our position for a strong showing anew next year. Right now, rather than running ourselves into the ground, shutting up shop to take a break might seem a sensible option to take up.

A period of rest and recuperation is possibly a form of reward for all we have achieved over the past twelve months. Without suggesting we should close down our activities completely for an extended time, a few days off will surely hurt nobody as we at least recharge our batteries fully.

The idea of shutting up shop to take a break could shock some folk, especially those not used to operating at anything less than full pelt. That said, there are occasions a moment of downtime can be the most productive action to undertake for the sake and benefit of future ongoing success.

We need not feel guilty about shutting up shop to take a break. Enjoying a quiet time to catch our breath, may also be considered a form of working. Without being able to offer our best self after the break the business will suffer. Shutting up shop to take a break is, therefore, more than symbolic. It is also strategic.

Not wishing to labour the point, particularly if you are in the process of shutting up shop to take a break, I will pause now.

Happy Holidays.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Reaching goals any way possible

December 14, 2017

Taxi reaching a goal

 

Keeping in mind the need for appropriate caution, reaching goals any way possible is something we may feel is, or should be, our overriding objective.

On the one hand, using all resources available to us and putting our experience into practice, we can go about reaching goals any way possible provided we are sufficiently organised and focused on what we wish to achieve.

With so many possible distractions around us, it is valid to look at reaching goals any way possible from a perspective of ‘All or nothing’. Nevertheless, we should not forget the element of enjoyment in our efforts as well as alignment with our values. Doing so would impact negatively on our authenticity and presence.

On the other hand, reaching goals any way possible is something we might find off-putting. Cold-calling, pushy sales techniques and aggressive advertising are viewed by many as relics from the past. Collaboration among stakeholders and respect for society as a whole are ideas now prevalent at work and beyond.

However the concept of reaching goals any way possible is handled ‘by the masses’, it is for us individually to interpret the situation according to our own thinking. Or maybe not. Please feel free to share your input on the issue of ‘Reaching goals any way possible’ by leaving a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Taking care as we proceed on our way

December 10, 2017

Care sign

 

It is rarely wise to walk into an endeavour or activity without assessing, even briefly, the risks we could face sooner or later. In a similar way, ignoring the action of taking care as we proceed on our way, perhaps towards a strategic objective, is something best avoided.

Although we may be so captured by our goal that we feel any moment away from engaging with it is a loss of time, taking care as we proceed on our way is actually an undertaking likely to enhance success as opposed to keep it away from us.

Likewise, attempting anything when not in the best of conditions, usually means we are forced to repeat certain elements of it again, as mistakes or instances of sub-standard performance need to be compensated for.

‘Running on empty’ is a phrase much used in the field of personal development to suggest the idea of not taking care as we proceed on our way. Experiencing exhaustion, being burnt out or feeling overly stressed are companions we can do without as we continue marching forward.

Of course, taking care might also involve being aware of other potential issues, not just physical fatigue. Evaluating financial costs, timing questions and so forth will keep projects not only to schedule, within the budget and aligned to desired outcomes but ensure we are taking care as we proceed on our way.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Is it raining on the activities of today or watering the seeds of tomorrow?

December 7, 2017

Raining on window

 

Looking at the many issues facing us, it could be fair to ask in a poetic manner ‘Is it raining on the activities of today or watering the seeds of tomorrow?

In the first instance, it is possible to think difficulties are upsetting our plans and ruining the progress we feel should be ours. The ‘rain’ is denying us the enjoyment we would have if the day was full of ‘sunshine’ or agreeable initiatives.

From a more positive perspective, we might discover in actual fact these testing times are the nutrients or the water for tomorrow’s success. We may not appreciate the upsets but they are preparing the ground, as it were, for a future filled with joy and wellbeing.

Regardless of how we view the moment, we always have the option of embracing it instead of attempting to push it away. By moving towards whatever the day brings, we have the chance to assess a thing better and, ideally, find the most beneficial strategy for working with it.

Alternatively, we can figuratively stay indoors and hope the ‘rain’ passes quickly. Whilst it will pass, its timing is out of our control and we risk to lose key opportunities as we pretend challenges are not part of the great mosaic of life.

Thanks for reading this ‘Is it raining on the activities of today or watering the seeds of tomorrow?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How do we bring our best self into being?

December 3, 2017

Tools

 

How do we bring our best self into being? In all probability, we are moving through each day in a manner effective for reaching daily goals and objectives. The output of our efforts and endeavours are clear for all to see if anyone is actually interested in looking.

However, maximising our energy and using our potential to the full, how do we bring our best self into being? Coasting through life, doing just enough without giving any more, is an option for those wishing to ‘keep their heads down’ and ‘avoid making too many waves’ to use two clichés.

The problem with this strategy of ‘playing small’ is that life rarely seems to respect those attempting to live in this fashion. Challenges arise and to confront them – be they related to work, health, financial issues or whatever – we are obliged to consider the question “How do we bring our best self into being?

Without bringing our self into being, it is unlikely we will be successful in dealing with what is blocking our progress. So, how do we bring our self into being? Perhaps the first thing is to believe we are capable of harnessing our experience and abilities then focus these on all we need to accomplish.

Offering a half-hearted version of ourselves serves nobody, including ourselves. Giving less than 100% is not a way to save something for later but in actual fact a waste of an opportunity now. ‘Being realistic’ means, in this case, asking ‘How do we bring our best self into being?’ and answering it honestly.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?

November 30, 2017

Leaves

 

With all that is occurring around the world, the collective answer to the inquiry “To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?” could easily be something akin to “Greatly”.

However, the response of the majority masks, in a way, the voice of the individual. Each of us has a personal interpretation of current times. We probably base our feelings not only on whatever is around us but also on how well we are progressing towards our objectives, whilst living our potential along the path.

Certainly frustrations, challenges and the like form part of any endeavour. Nevertheless, if we think about our major triumphs to date we will surely note they were achieved despite the presence of difficulties. We coped then and we can do it again.

From this proactive perspective, as we go about doing and being our best, we may respond individually “Not at all” to the question “To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?

If you’d like to share your thoughts on the ideas put forward here, please feel free to leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent do we feel overwhelmed by the moment?’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Building the future: an ongoing task

November 26, 2017

Building works

 

Reading the title ‘Building the future: an ongoing task’ may suggest development is an endeavour without end. In a sense, we could say this is the case, yet we need not be overwhelmed by this thought.

Taking the effort we have made to reach where we are, we are in a position to evaluate the extent it has brought us to where we had hoped at the beginning of the undertaking. From here, and with our goal for the future clearly at the centre of our actions, we have the opportunity to continue on our way.

Is building the future an ongoing task? From this perspective, we should respond in the affirmative. Resting on our laurels is not an option in most situations as successes quickly turn into yesterday’s memories given life flows ever on.

Ideally, we won’t be forced to repeat all the construction phases undertaken previously. The foundation for us to be triumphant tomorrow is the sum of all our experience to date, plus the resources and know-how at our disposition right now. Putting these items to work is a key responsibility we have towards ourselves.

In certain instances, the agenda of others dictates the nature and speed of our development. However, even at these times we still have our attitude and enthusiasm under our control to be harnessed for the sake of building the future, an ongoing task indeed.

To conclude, let me just ask you to what extent for you is building the future an ongoing task?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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