Being ready for daily challenges

July 27, 2017

 

Being ready for daily challenges might involve any number of crucial steps. Some of these, by the nature of the challenges themselves, will be specific. Others may take on a more generic feel. We can explore three of these general steps now.

1. Being ready for daily challenges
Rather than diving straight into the day, mentally reviewing with a positive outcome clearly in mind the planned events and commitments of the upcoming twenty-four hours, gives guidance to the day.

2. Being ready for daily challenges
Cultivating a ‘winning mentality’ over the course of time helps us manage daily challenges. We nurture this mentality by reminding ourselves of our past achievements and moments in which we demonstrated, even if only to ourselves, our potential to handle successfully various issues.

3. Being ready for daily challenges
Accepting in advance whatever the day offers us, and holding onto the intention to face things as they are rather than spending time and energy fighting against the reality, keeps us focused on our objectives.

Regardless of how well we prepare ourselves, however, there are going to be occasions we ‘lose’. That said, we ‘win’ also then when we take learning from those instances and use the lessons to perform better next time.

To share your input on the matter of ‘Being ready for daily challenges’, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What small changes would make big improvements for you?

July 23, 2017

I might be wrong, but I believe you know in your heart what small changes would make big improvements for you and how you experience life.

Each of us goes through the day accomplishing this and that, ticking off all the items on our To Do lists. However, many times whilst achieving much it is not unusual to feel there is something more we could or should be doing or giving.

This nagging feeling holds the key to understanding what small changes would make big improvements for you, me and all our stakeholders. Possibly we are setting our sights too low and so need to stretch ourselves. Then again, we may be staying in a role or situation just because it is easy and we feel in control.

Whilst such thinking is valid, when we really listen to our heart it can become a wake-up call for us. If not, today quickly becomes ‘five years later’ and although the enthusiasm to ‘be our best’ remains, commitments will have increased in proportion to a decrease of energy and courage to undertake any small changes.

There is no need to upset the proverbial apple cart just for the sake of doing so. Nevertheless, an amendment here and a change of habits there are doable, especially so when you have decided what small changes would make big improvements for you.

Thanks for reading this ‘What small changes would make big improvements for you?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How to manage our daily outlook

July 20, 2017

 

Irrespective of where we are, what we are doing and even why we are doing it, learning how to manage our daily outlook will play a large role in the way we experience the day. The exercise, however, can last a lifetime or be completed in the blink of an eye.

As ever, the speed of acquisition is a personal matter. And clarity concerning the benefits associated with a managed daily outlook is perhaps the first step to developing this desirable skill.

We could think of a boat drifting without direction. Any wave, current or wind would move the vessel. Yet unless the destination is unimportant, such a journey appears pointless. In a similar fashion, our outlook is a point of reference for the flow of the day.

Asking ourselves how to manage our daily outlook opens the mind to reflection. We might discover in the process a certain propensity towards one or more specific methods.

Whether it be focusing on goals to the exclusion of all else around us or using our time as constructively as possible across a range of endeavours, we need to be comfortable with any eventual changes we wish or need to implement as a result of our efforts.

If you’d like to ponder how to manage your daily outlook as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘How to manage our daily outlook’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?

July 16, 2017

Sunrise on tomorrow

 

Let’s be clear from the start by asking to what extent are we ready for tomorrow? we are assuming there will be a tomorrow. Usually I prefer to avoid assumptions, but in this case, I have made an exception. So, with fingers crossed and touching wood, I’ll let the supposition about tomorrow stand.

Two points spring to mind concerning ‘To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?

Firstly, the extent is important. Giving ourselves the maximum chance of obtaining a successful tomorrow depends on what we do today. Secondly, the matter is under our control and hence we will also be partly responsible for the resulting outcome too.

Preparing for an assignment or undertaking is a key element to being ready. Ideally, we set aside time to investigate what is required of us and then take the appropriate actions to acquire the relevant skills. Of course, this may mean a bringing together of existing items if the event is one we are pretty familiar with.

Should it be this inquiry about to what extent are we ready for tomorrow has stirred you to action today for tomorrow, and you’d like to explore options as part of a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent are we ready for tomorrow?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation

July 13, 2017

People working on the beach

 

It almost goes without saying that work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation. Depending on a) the location, b) type of employment and maybe above all else c) our attitude, what we are engaged to undertake can quite easily, from a different point of view, be considered as leisure.

However, we should not fall into the trap of thinking that just because work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation it is unimportant, a trivial pursuit and so forth. We may wish to make reference to the often quoted expression: “Take your work seriously, but yourself less so.”

Being employed to use skills, intuition and time is an important matter, deserving our full attention. Just because we might actually love what we do and gain pleasure from doing it – if you have to review books I guess you can do it just as well on the beach as in an office – does not mean it is not work.

In a perfect world, we would all be working in similarly pleasing positions, giving our all as we hold onto the idea that work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation. Though it is not so for everyone.

There is no reason, for the sake of offering a new twist on the issue why relaxation from another perspective could not be seen as work. How tiring is it to grab our place by the pool, ensure the tan is even and have sufficient reading material to last a whole day on the sun lounger?

For sure it is as taxing perhaps as commuting daily, standing in line for the lift, staring in despair at the hundreds of messages to be dealt with and on and on. Before this post takes an even sillier turn, let me stop.

Thanks, truly, for taking the time to read this ‘Work from another perspective could be seen as relaxation’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Moving up by taking the necessary steps

July 9, 2017

Steps going up

 

Though it is rarely an automatic route, moving up by taking the necessary steps is an achievable objective for many.

Moving up might imply not only the actual increase in experience and ability but also a deepening of knowledge to consolidate earlier endeavours and efforts. Becoming a master may actually mean knowing when to let go of certain issues as opposed to attempting to embrace everything.

‘Taking’ within the context of the title ‘Moving up by taking the necessary steps’ refers to the proactive activity of ‘doing something’. It is not enough to want to move up. We have to back our intention with action. This is especially so when exploring the notion of bettering ourselves.

The necessary steps, quite rightly, will include a mix of general development activities and specific task-orientated learning projects. Without these fundamental stages of the ongoing learning cycle, it is unfair to expect any upward progression within our chosen field of study, work or leisure.

Finding within our heart the force to do whatever is needed to get ourselves off the sofa is crucial to making progress. Your input on the subject of ‘Moving up by taking the necessary steps’ can add to these ideas. Accordingly, please feel free to share by leaving a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Moving up by taking the necessary steps’ post.

Brian.

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer
Coach – Trainer – Adjunct Professor – Author

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves

Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bgdtcoaching

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

Publications

Heart Poems On Waves (2017)

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Is it really true that work never ends?

July 6, 2017

Work sign

 

With many projects in the pipeline, a million and one tasks to be completed by an ever nearing deadline, plus calls on our time from family and friends, it is fair to answer a responding “Yes” to the question “Is it really true that work never ends?

Such a position would be acceptable on many levels, but one giving little scope for further words here. Also, if you are a regular reader of these posts you surely appreciate I see work as a part of life to be enjoyed as far as possible in the same way as any other activity.

So, is it really true that work never ends?

If, like me, you love what you do under the heading of work you will probably connect with the thinking that work never stops, but likewise never starts. If, on the other hand, you don’t enjoy your work/job/current status of employment, what are you currently doing to change your situation?

Unless the seeds are planted flowers cannot grow and it is the same with pleasurable activities. In a roundabout way the question “Is it really true that work never ends?” has been pondered.

To share your thoughts on the issue “Is it really true that work never ends?”, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer
Coach – Trainer – Adjunct Professor – Author

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves

Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bgdtcoaching

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

Publications

Heart Poems On Waves (2017)

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


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