Being mean with our access and generous with our energy

September 27, 2020

Regardless of our status, giving others unlimited access to our days might lead to us being treated like doormats by everybody.

Being mean with our access and generous with our energy, on the contrary, is a strategy worth exploring.

Perhaps the word ‘mean’ is too strong here. But, in any case, each of us will attach our interpretation to it, so maybe it is not a big issue in the context of being mean with our access and generous with our energy.

That said, restricting access to our days, in person or via digital means, ensures we have the opportunity to ‘get things done’ as opposed to just ‘get through the day’.

But once we have decided, or are obliged in certain instances, to give access to someone, being generous with our energy is a powerful approach to life. By connecting with people in this manner, we are demonstrating we value them, without undervaluing ourselves.

Thanks for stopping by here today and please like and share this ‘Being mean with our access and generous with our energy’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being in contact

April 21, 2019

Being in contact could be summed up by the idea that we are all connected 24/7, attached to our phones or similar devices, glued to the screen displaying this and that.

As much as this definition might be true for some people, I imagine for the majority of us the reality in terms of ‘being in contact’ is somewhat different. In a similar fashion to any aspect of our life, we have the opportunity to choose our level of availability towards those who wish to reach out to us.

Being in contact does not automatically infer being in contact at any hour. If we decide to offer such accessibility, the chances are it is probably to an exclusive group of people, perhaps consisting of loved ones rather than clients or mere online acquaintances.

The benefits of being in contact on our terms are numerous, including in no particular order: a sense of balance, freedom to engage deeply as opposed to superficially, opportunities to operate aligned with priorities plus a feeling of empowerment concerning the management of technology.

To share your input on the issue of being in contact, please leave a comment, whenever you want, below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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