Is seeing red our most beneficial response to the moment?

November 18, 2018

Red beach hut

Anger has its place in our toolkit and occasionally is useful as a way to focus our efforts but then again, is seeing red our most beneficial response to the moment?

We might wish to lash out and let our frustration have its time in the spotlight. However, rarely are we rewarded with a positive outcome when this occurs. Just as we heighten the tension in an already stressful situation, others will likewise react to our outburst in a similar way.

Asking ourselves ‘Is seeing red our most beneficial response to the moment?’ and taking a while to ponder our answer goes a long way toward managing our reaction. After an appropriate amount of reflection – each of us knows how much is appropriate – we are in a position to take action, react or let go.

If we are the type of people who like to keep our emotions in check, a laser-like sharp-tongued quip would impact greatly on those around us. Accordingly, the reply to the enquiry ‘Is seeing red our most beneficial response to the moment?’ is a resounding ‘Yes’.

Folk more inclined to puff and blow at the slightest provocation have in a certain sense already given away any advantage by responding angrily as ‘Seeing red’ will be viewed by everyone as ’their natural way of being’.

All in all, finding our ‘best’ approach to life remains a personal quest. To join the conversation here on the issue of the question ‘Is seeing red our most beneficial response to the moment?’ please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How imposing to others is our presence?

October 4, 2018

Imposing building

Even as we march forward with our projects – doing this, completing that – it is useful to reflect on the question ‘How imposing to others is our presence?

Our answer might bring to light some interesting insights. As much as our focus is on getting through the day with a positive mindset, we may be inspiring those around us to concentrate in a similar fashion without us being aware of it. The example we offer by ‘doing’ is also a way of ‘being’ and this is replicable.

Alternatively, our eyes could be so fixed on a goal we fail to notice any negative impact we are making on those with whom we interact. For these people, asking ‘How imposing to others is our presence?’ touches a nerve as a certain indifference or lack of concern sums up our imposing presence.

Regardless of the eventual response to the inquiry ‘How imposing to others is our presence?’, ideally, we are operating aligned with our values and living them through all our endeavours. And if we are not, then it is fair to suggest we have not yet unleashed our potential on the world so our impact is minimal at best.

Provided we are happy being in the shadow of who we are, all is good. When this is not the case, stepping into who we are becomes crucial. Possibly a complimentary coaching conversation with me, via Skype or Google+ hangout, is the first stage on this journey for you. Let me know and we can get it done.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘How imposing to others is our presence?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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