Observing on a daily basis the tide of life

September 30, 2018

Tide slowing in

With the summer fading into the realm of memories, maybe now is not the time to think about the sea, yet observing on a daily basis the tide of life is always a beneficial practice.

We could take observing on a daily basis the tide of life to mean noticing our breathing and engaging in a moment of reflection.

Sitting quietly, being aware of the flow of our breath as thoughts pass through the mind, is a way of observing on a daily basis the tide of life. Ideas form, arrive then disperse as waves break on the shore. There is no need to hold onto anything, we can let everything come and then let everything go.

Input worthy of being followed up will remain in one form or another after the exercise. The rest will be long gone.

Watching the clouds is another method of observing on a daily basis the tide of life. Once again, it is unnecessary to endeavour to grasp onto a specific shape, image or thought. The value of observing on a daily basis the tide of life is found in the process, not the results.

Taking awareness beyond a single instance to a subsequent one then the next, on the other hand, does give us a tangible result, one of being present in a world seemingly doing everything to keep us as if in a trance.

Thanks for reading this ‘Observing on a daily basis the tide of life’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

Advertisements

Are we resonating with the world around us?

January 7, 2018

 

Streets around us

Questions leading to a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answer leave little space for in-depth reflection. Yet in certain cases, our answer is clear to us and we are able to cope without the benefit of such pondering. The inquiry ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ cuts to the core of our outlook, deserving a few words here.

With our goals set, plans in place and efforts focused, it is easy to be unconcerned with anything attempting to distract us from our endeavour. At such times, we offer a resounding ‘No’ to the query ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ We are ‘in the zone’ and able to ignore everything else.

Still, even when we are concentrated on achieving this or that, our presence and awareness is part of the world around us. Resonating with it – without getting wrapped up in events and situations we have little or no control over – is an option worth, at least, evaluating.

As ever, other perspectives are available to us. Spending a few moments exploring these could change our response to the initial question ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


Why the best souvenirs reside in the heart

May 14, 2017

Souvenirs

 

You might be wondering about what I mean with the heading “Why the best souvenirs reside in the heart”. Possibly I am implying the knick-knacks often hawked near popular tourist attractions are less valuable than the memories we create merely by being there.

Alternatively, I might be attempting to explain with the statement “Why the best souvenirs reside in the heart” that to truly reconnect at a later date with a pleasant event or visit, for example, the most important ‘souvenirs’ are those ‘purchased’ by actually living the moment fully at the time of its occurrence.

By being present we avoid that common feeling of having done something, seen something or someone, yet can remember nothing about it. Moving through the day as if on autopilot is the opposite of being present and therefore this is why the best souvenirs reside in the heart.

The notion of a lovely thrilling encounter with reality, or a glimpsing through the crack of illusion if you prefer, is something for which no t-shirts are sold nor fridge magnets exist. Nevertheless, such experiences do occur and accordingly is why the best souvenirs reside in the heart.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves

Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bgdtcoaching

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained Co-Active Coach, and Freelance Trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

Publications

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Waiting patiently, again

November 6, 2016

Waiting on a bench

 

Continuing with the theme of waiting patiently (click here to read part one), again with emphasis placed on the benefits we may obtain from waiting patiently, looking at the question from the viewpoint of learning, three points spring to mind.

Firstly, waiting patiently for comprehension to settle inside us is a key aspect of internalizing a lesson. Giving ourselves time to truly absorb something allows us to have more confidence in our ability when called upon to apply it.

Secondly, waiting patiently for results to flourish can mean we reduce the risk of upsetting the natural process of development. Certain things require a specific amount of time to elapse prior to their appearance as desired outcomes. Rushing when we should be actually waiting patiently does little to help our growth, but much to harm it.

Thirdly and finally, waiting patiently puts the new information we have taken on board into perspective. We might wish to know everything immediately, yet life flows at its own pace. When we are ready and our capacity to handle new situations has matured, we will be challenged to act. Reacting early indicates we have not passed sufficient time waiting patiently.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

The stage of work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2016)

Performance skills at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2015)

Personal performance potential at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2013)

Reflections on performance at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2012)

Elements of theatre at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2010)

Training through drama for work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2009)


Waiting patiently

September 4, 2016

People waiting patiently

 

It is probably fair to say most people are loathed to spend time waiting patiently. In some cases it could be certain folk are actually unable to spend more than a few minutes on the exercise. Others may have merely decided they are never going to wait for anything or anyone.

Yet when circumstances permit – or we control ourselves enough to undertake it – waiting patiently can bring unexpected benefits. The first of these could be related to a calming down of ourselves as we engage in the unusual activity of doing nothing else besides waiting.

Doing just one thing rather than spread our energy across a number of matters offers the mind a chance to catch up as it were.

Another potential advantage connected to waiting patiently is the opportunity we give ourselves to appreciate life at a pace different from the frenzied one we might engage in on a daily basis. Seeing our surroundings from this perspective allows us to embrace further our position in the world.

So often the richness of our existence is lost in the hustle and bustle of our ‘normal’ routine. That birds sing, clouds drift across the sky, some people actually smile and so on, can easily be lost to us if we are not waiting patiently, but huffing and puffing instead about time lost here or there.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Dominating the moment

August 28, 2016

View dominating the moment

 

It might be interesting to reflect on what is dominating the moment for us right now.

A negative outlook may mean the things dominating the moment are mainly what we are lacking or unable to manage in the manner most suitable to us. It is easy in such times to think all the world is against us. Looming mountains and dark clouds can feature in a painting of this instance.

If the current outlook is of a more neutral nature, the items dominating the moment could be of a simple quality, flat and without any immediately noticeable elements.

Perhaps you are in the middle of a really positive period of life. In this case the things dominating the moment are possibly viewed as being larger than life cute cartoon characters, favourite treats or any other such pleasant items cherished by you.

Alternative visions of the moment are available to us. Maybe these present a kaleidoscope of emotions, coupled with a vibrancy stimulating in its own way. If you wish to discuss whatever is dominating the moment for you as part of a coaching conversation, please get in touch.

For now, thanks for reading this post. To share your input on the issue of ‘dominating the moment‘, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Clarity through the clouds

April 24, 2016

Clarity through the clouds

Seeking clarity through the clouds of uncertainly is an action we probably all engage in from time to time. That we attempt to find clarity through the clouds is perhaps testimony to our belief in its existence. After all, it would be pointless to set about searching for clarity though the clouds without thinking it is there.

Yet once we begin our efforts in discovering clarity through the clouds, the question arises as to what we will do with it when we have found it.

For some people it might mean a confirmation of initial thoughts. Getting proof keeps us on track to achieving our goals, notwithstanding obstacles and the like. For others, the action of looking is itself a satisfying one and each step forward brings new awareness in its own fashion.

Whatever works best for us is, as ever, the optimum way ahead. And momentum builds as we go about focusing attention and effort on taking responsibility for our actions.

On the other hand, waiting for the bright light of understanding to arrive ‘out of the blue’ could be just another form of procrastination at times. To be fair though, on occasions, clarity through the clouds is actually encountered in the silence and energy of doing nothing but breathing.

Without wanting this post to drag on and on, let me stop now. However, if you feel coaching can be beneficial to gaining clarity through the clouds of current confusion, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


%d bloggers like this: