Being ready for daily challenges

July 27, 2017

 

Being ready for daily challenges might involve any number of crucial steps. Some of these, by the nature of the challenges themselves, will be specific. Others may take on a more generic feel. We can explore three of these general steps now.

1. Being ready for daily challenges
Rather than diving straight into the day, mentally reviewing with a positive outcome clearly in mind the planned events and commitments of the upcoming twenty-four hours, gives guidance to the day.

2. Being ready for daily challenges
Cultivating a ‘winning mentality’ over the course of time helps us manage daily challenges. We nurture this mentality by reminding ourselves of our past achievements and moments in which we demonstrated, even if only to ourselves, our potential to handle successfully various issues.

3. Being ready for daily challenges
Accepting in advance whatever the day offers us, and holding onto the intention to face things as they are rather than spending time and energy fighting against the reality, keeps us focused on our objectives.

Regardless of how well we prepare ourselves, however, there are going to be occasions we ‘lose’. That said, we ‘win’ also then when we take learning from those instances and use the lessons to perform better next time.

To share your input on the matter of ‘Being ready for daily challenges’, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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From afar

August 25, 2016

Lancing College from afar

 

Sometimes when seeing something from afar we can dismiss its importance to us. Perhaps we are unable to understand how this or that could have any influence over our life from such a distance. Indeed from afar numerous things seem inconsequential.

Yet if we think about many great inventions we take for granted today, it is perceivable their inventors had the capacity to pull out their creation from a vision in their mind. From afar these pioneers in various fields captured an idea other people may have seen, but had failed to comprehend.

However, in a similar way we have the ability to tap into our inner wisdom, a knowledge possibly coming from the depth of time. This source from afar is ours to use according to our values, aligned to our best intentions.

As with any issue regarding our progress through life, the way forward is personal and its relevance to us conceivably beyond our capability to express it in words. All the same, we hold onto an objective even if its existence is barely visible from afar, trusting it will be part of our future.

Two crucial elements in the process of reaching our goals are i) belief in our goals and ii) confidence in our ability to reach them. These things help us to go out and succeed in our efforts.

From afar this is quite likely evident to us. Getting up closer to the question we might begin to doubt ourselves. At this point the motivation which started us on this path will play a key role in moving us forward.

Thanks for reading this ‘From afar‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


The obstacle before us

January 27, 2016

Obstacle before us

Without clarifying the obstacle before us, it is easy to think all is impossible. From such a position, the jump to berating ourselves for attempting to do this or that is short. Once we are following this line of thinking, the decision to give up is usually reached pretty quickly.

Of course this mindset is not the only one available to connect with. The obstacle before us may actually be holding all sorts of opportunities for us to develop ourselves, our resolve and our determination to reach certain goals.

The obstacle before us, in this case, should perhaps be appreciated as a moment for us to demonstrate our ability to handle challenges. What the issue has to teach us could be found by embracing it, as opposed to instinctively shying away from it.

Reaching a goal without having to overcome an obstacle, might leave us feeling short-changed. ‘The journey seemed too easy’ or ‘I didn’t really have to do anything, so I’m not worthy of praise’. Unfortunately these tales we tell ourselves can spoil the moment if we think they are true.

Being curious I’d love to learn your thoughts on the topic examined here, accordingly don’t hesitate to leave a comment below if you so wish. For now, thanks for reading ‘The obstacle before us‘.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Embracing this instance

December 17, 2015

Seasonal scene

Embracing this instance is all about being present.” #bgdtcoaching.

Though it is easy to think today is just a copy of yesterday, by embracing this instance we can appreciate the richness and uniqueness of the moment.

Of course, society likes to underline notable events throughout the year. Partly this is driven by commercial interests, and partly by the desire to maintain or promote our cultural heritage.

Individually, how we go about embracing this instance is oftentimes conditioned by how we feel towards the matter in question, as well as our current sentiments. Feeling indifferent or disinterested in what is going on around us, we could easily choose to ignore external goings-on.

Embracing this instance, on the other hand, could be a way of acknowledging we are part of this reality. Liking or not liking everything here is not the issue. We may appreciate events around us, participating in the moment if we wish, without getting wrapped up in things too much.

Letting go of yesterday and setting aside tomorrow, we give ourselves the opportunity to live fully right now. So yes, embracing this instance is all about being present.

Other perspectives are surely worth exploring with regards to embracing this instance. To share your input, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this ‘Embracing this instance‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Out there

August 20, 2015

Sea view out there

Out there life is easy. Out there work is painless. Out there obstacles are non-existent. Really? To what extent have we actually verified these statements? Why are we so sure the proverbial grass, or sea, is ‘greener’ there than it is here?

Believing things are better somewhere else, consciously or otherwise, we create conditions which in a way ensure things live up to our expectations. And in a similar fashion, by focusing exclusively on negative aspects of where we are now we give support to our thinking about out there.

Being satisfied where we are, out there or here now, is much about connecting with life in its entirety. Knowing the present is a fleeting instance, and our perceptions of it are likewise evolving continuously, might encourage us to enjoy right now actually right here.

Regardless of our pleasure or displeasure with it, embracing the moment is an attitude we have under our control. The effort and indeed the action of using this power will impact greatly on how we see the world, out there or right here, in the next second following this one. Perhaps.

Whether out there is where you are or not, let me thank you for spending a few minutes of your time here today. Please feel free to leave a comment below concerning this ‘Out there‘ post if you so wish.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Finding the line

August 13, 2015

Bowling picture

Without entering into the skills of bowling – something about which I know little – we can ponder the idea of finding the line of our existence amidst the vast possibilities before us.

For some people it could be daunting to be faced with numerous choices and endless opportunities. The sense of feeling overwhelmed in such cases is easily brought to mind. Others may flourish in similar conditions. Finding the line for these folk is, we can imagine, an action without stress.

Evaluating options, weighing up strategies and then deciding, takes time and effort. The alternative could be to follow the masses, hoping they lead us to where we would like to go, or at least to a place not too disturbing for us. It is a personal issue for us all.

It might be argued we all actually know, deep within our heart, the right way for us to live our life. Finding the line is a case of listening, from this perspective, to our inner wisdom and trusting it. Easy to suggest, less so to do, yet very worthwhile for those who are able to do so.

Finding the line, as mentioned is a personal endeavour. If you’d like to join the conversation and offer your observation, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Finding the line‘ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Rhythm of life

August 9, 2015

Rhythm sign

“Moving to the rhythm of life is a way of entering into the flow of the moment.” #bgdtcoaching.

Without entering into a wordy post regarding the issue of flow – Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s classic book entitled Flow remains a point of reference if you wish to explore this – a few sentences can be spent concerning the rhythm of life.

Whether it is at work or whilst enjoying a few moments engaged in a leisure activity, or indeed merely going about our daily tasks, we can connect with the rhythm of life with a little effort on our part.

By embracing the here and now we are demonstrating to ourselves our ability to live in that space between the memories of yesterday and the worries and hopes of tomorrow. Right now the rhythm of life is a music capable of lifting us to our optimum state of being. We just need to open our heart to hear it.

With the rhythm of life carrying us forward, let me just thank you for stopping by here today. If you’d like to share your input on the rhythm of life, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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