Setbacks need not make us cry

December 2, 2018

Fried onions

Although it is fair to accept they happen, setbacks need not make us cry. Whether we mean this literally or figuratively is of little relevance.

Once an event, situation or other unwanted issue arrives in the form of a setback, it is up to us to manage our reaction to it and the impact it has or could have on our plans.

Finding a positive side to a supposedly negative occurrence is not always possible. Nevertheless, once again setbacks need not make us cry. We might be able to at least find learning within the moment and use this to help further our progress.

With so many projects probably on the go at any one time, it is only right to almost expect the occasional challenge. Perhaps we should actually be concerned if all proceeds as hoped for.

But accepting passively a disappointment or interruption to our schedule is not what this ‘Setbacks need not make us cry’ post is about. Choosing a proactive approach, to make the best of whatever turns up, is.

However, thinking about the idea that setbacks need not make us cry, I’m curious to learn how you handle difficulties along the way to your desired objectives. To share your ideas here, please leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Setbacks need not make us cry’ offering today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being aware of possible challenges before us

November 15, 2018

 

Warning flag on beach

Being aware of possible challenges before us need not, in any case, stop us from proceeding with our efforts to be the best we can be.

Carrying an element of attention along with us can ensure our endeavours are undertaken with sufficient caution in terms of us being aware of possible challenges before us. We may decide to avoid certain difficulties and tackle others. Our decision will be based on a number of factors including how confident we feel in ourselves and our abilities to overcome this or that.

As with most things in life, we need to distinguish between what is within our capabilities to be dealt with successfully and what, based on our knowledge, common sense, or intuition, is beyond us. Being aware of possible challenges before us is perhaps the first step but not the last.

The path we choose to walk as we attempt to live our potential is personal, as is the responsibility for decisions made along the way. Right now, I wonder to what extent we are being aware of possible challenges before us?

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How comfortable are we in the comfort zone?

November 8, 2018

Comfortable surroundings

Yes, I do like asking questions and, by the fact you are here, I guess you like being asked them. So, let’s explore one in the shape of “How comfortable are we in the comfort zone?

To begin, we might react by arguing we are not in the comfort zone. On many levels, this may be true but there is usually an area of life in which we prefer to ‘play small’, allow things to drift, accept the status quo and so forth.

It is conceivable we are pushing ourselves in other parts of our life at the same time. Even so, that other area keeps us attached to the comfort zone.

Recently a client was pondering the potential benefits of a new position at work. The salary increase was significant. Nonetheless, he was reluctant to commit to the promotion for fear of upsetting his family routine.

Once he began looking at the situation from various perspectives, he realized the habits he was so concerned to maintain were actually holding all the family back. His growing children were fed up with ‘the same old family weekend activities’ and both he and his wife longed for time away together for a change.

The image of the family routine had taken over from the reality. With that issue in the open, he was better able to understand the promotion would offer all the family far more opportunities than problems, plus the change could be the catalyst to giving his children more freedom as per their wishes.

So, how comfortable are we in the comfort zone? To discuss this question in the form of a complimentary coaching conversation, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Appreciating the spectacle nature offers us

October 28, 2018

Nature scene of colourful sky

Appreciating the spectacle nature offers us is a free activity providing an incredible return. There are few sights more inspiring than the sky splashed with colour or the waves breaking against the shore.

Giving ourselves the time to engage in appreciating the spectacle nature offers us is also a gift we all surely deserve on occasions. And regular indulgence will, unlike other treats, be endlessly advantageous to us too.

Heightened imagination, creativity and a sense of being part of this wonderful world are just a few of the benefits we receive as we go about appreciating the spectacle nature offers us.

On the other hand, certain actions – polluting the sea with plastic, fracking and unregulated building, for example – are ways we destroy the chances for future generations of appreciating the spectacle nature offers us. Awareness of our actions would be a good first step to changing our ‘less charming’ habits.

But then you already know such things and so I will stop now so we can continue going about appreciating the spectacle nature offers us.

Kindest regards and thanks for being here today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Adding a splash of creativity to the day

September 27, 2018

Creative dishes

What would change if we were to indulge in adding a splash of creativity to the day?

Hearing a group of postgraduate students moan and groan about room changes, timetable clashes and such like, makes me wonder how they will deal with the typical chaos associated with many working environments nowadays.

Deadlines brought forward, reports requiring last-minute additions, plus a whole host of other unexpected challenges are in their way adding a splash of creativity to the day we could say. Operating with flexibility is a skill worth acquiring and using in any setting, sooner rather than later.

So, getting back to the concept of adding a splash of creativity to the day, what would be different if we were to put ourselves mentally into the shoes of those with whom we are feeling stressed?

Let’s imagine ourselves as call centre operators before we send them away with a flea in their ear for having dared called us as part of their job. And to what extent can we experience empathy for airport ground crew who are attempting to make the best of trying situations caused by poorly produced check-in procedures?

Please feel free to share your input on the issue of adding a splash of creativity to the day by leaving a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Washed up but not washed out

June 28, 2018

Boats washed up

Taking a mindful rest from the endless challenge of pushing ourselves forward might be viewed as us being washed up but not washed out.

According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, being ‘washed up’ refers to an item “deposited by the tide on a shore”. A figurative break on the side – before we feel washed out, “pale and tired” to quote the dictionary again – not only does us good now but can help us be more productive later.

Washed up but not washed out’ may also be read as a way to direct efforts relating to this or that project. At a certain point, it could be necessary to suspend our input. Giving a pause to things in such instances allows us to take stock of where we are with the endeavour, and understand what still needs doing.

Regardless of how you are feeling at present, washed up or washed out, thanks for stopping by and reading this post today. If you would like to share your thoughts on the topic of being washed up but not washed out, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Limited options limit our choice

June 14, 2018

Limited options on food stall

Focusing on the idea of how limited options limit our choice, we could look at why we fail to see numerous opportunities available to us at any moment.

So often we hold on tight to what we feel is the only option, or way forward, for us and in doing so lose sight of potentially more beneficial alternatives. There might be an element of fear responsible for our lack of courage to select new, untried, avenues open to us.

Doing what we have always done may not be getting us to where we say we would like to be but it is ‘safe’, ‘comfortable’ and ‘within our ability to manage’. ‘Playing small’ some may say in a judgemental manner.

Another factor restricting our vision is possibly our inability to put actual worries, fears and doubts into a perspective of reality. Rarely are challenges so pressing, so crucial, that we are obliged to renounce our good sense to deal with them immediately. And yet we do just that many times over.

Putting all our energy into sorting out the latest ‘squeaking door’ we forget to give attention to issues more likely to be advantageous to us in the coming future. ‘Limited options limit our choice’ or better ‘Poor priority management limits our future’.

With society fixated by the idea of ‘moving forward’, few find the strength of character or inclination to buck the trend and hit the pause button to review progress, plus the likely destination continuing with current efforts will lead towards.

Well, having pondered the idea that limited options limit our choice, I had better stop now. I hope the input here has, in some way, provided material for reflection. Thanks for reading this ‘Limited options limit our choice’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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