Challenges seen as opportunities

August 19, 2018

Challenging outlook

Let’s be clear, setbacks are frustrating but challenges seen as opportunities give us benefits.

In the first instance, challenges seen as opportunities take us to a mindset more attuned to success than one limited by negativity, concerns about delays and failure. We are almost inclined to look for problems after we have embraced the idea of seeing such things as sources of learning and growth.

Additionally, we can focus on bringing solutions into being when ‘challenges seen as opportunities’ becomes our default way of handling the unexpected issues. In these moments we have the possibility to unlock our creativity and express our originality.

On the contrary, ploughing on with the same thinking that was applied before a challenge cropped up may, at best, produce the same setback.

Many other perspectives are equally worthy of investigation. However, whilst appreciating the testing nature of difficulties, it is precisely this characteristic that has pushed us to explore the idea of challenges seen as opportunities today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Appreciating the beauty of nature

August 16, 2018

Cloudscape

Why we should go about appreciating the beauty of nature is best answered according to our outlook on life.

If we are the type of people who dedicate a part of each day to connecting with our environment, the reasons for appreciating the beauty of nature will already be clear to us.

Alternatively, we might be so focused on our activities there remains no time to ‘indulge’ in appreciating the beauty of nature. All the same, doing so would offer us at least a pause after which we could get back to our things with renewed energy. Once again it comes back to our outlook on life.

On a broader scale, the exercise of appreciating the beauty of nature is one of tapping into an incredible source of creativity.

No two sunsets are ever alike. The clouds provide a constantly changing image, available to us with the mere lifting of our eyes to the sky. And the waves, well you get the idea.

Appreciating the beauty of nature is, additionally, a way to show respect towards the planet Earth. By observing the wonders of the countryside or the splendours of the mountains we unite with our world rather than take it for granted.

To share your input on the idea of appreciating the beauty of nature, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we anchored by old habits?

August 12, 2018

Anchor monument

Doing things ‘because we have always done them’ or ‘because everyone does’ are two phrases indicating the question ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ needs to be asked.

Tried and tested routines help us navigate known water in the shape of familiar challenges. Applying old habits frees us to focus attention on more testing waters. All the same, the idea of us being blocked, limited, restricted or anchored by our approach towards life is another thing.

On a micro level, we may discover a better restaurant around the corner from our usual lunchtime haunt. There might be much to be gained by reducing our television intake if we harness the willpower to avoid the sofa immediately after our evening meal. And so on and so on.

On a macro level, to what extent are we anchored by old habits? Well possibly to the extent we feel life has something more to offer us, or better we have something more to offer life. Unleashing our potential, in the form of doing something new, could even widen our horizons.

If you’d like to explore further the inquiry ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ in the form of a complimentary coaching conversation, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Do we want to wait?

August 9, 2018

Wait ideale for waiting

With the traditional summer holiday period in full swing in the northern hemisphere, perhaps we have time to ponder the question ‘Do we want to wait?

It might be the inquiry itself is linked to a particular event or activity requiring some time before it commences. Alternatively, we could be considering a new venture and need to be clear about when we should begin.

Asking ourselves ‘Do we want to wait?’, puts us on the spot. In all likelihood, we know the response in our heart yet may have shied away from it. The timing for certain specific matters is determined by factors beyond our control – Bank Holidays, annual festivities, for example, occur regardless of our priorities.

However, when responsibility for something is ours to carry, there should be an assessment of the likely success or otherwise of holding back from initiating actions or events. Our interests deserve attention. ‘Do we want to wait?’ thus transforms into ‘What are the costs and the gains associated with waiting?’

Clarifying these details is a crucial part of being in a position to answer with conviction the inquiry ‘Do we want to wait?’ And once we have decided our strategy we are in the position to move swiftly or enjoy a moment of leisure if we have given a resounding ‘Yes’ to the query ‘Do we want to wait?

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Following our chosen path

August 5, 2018

Following a chosen path

Carrying on from the previous post here, ‘Where will the journey lead us?’, we can spend a few minutes pondering what it means to us to be following our chosen path.

In the past, promotion or the lack of it was intertwined with corporate politics inside organizations and institutions. Setting aside the idea of ‘a job for life’ or ‘a single career spanning a lifetime’, we are now free to embrace the benefits associated with the personal responsibility of following our chosen path.

Being in charge of our destiny, in this respect, means we have few excuses not to work constantly to our potential. And in this manner, we are making ourselves available for whatever opportunities await us, even those as yet unknown to us as we go about following our chosen path.

If you’d like to share your thoughts on the issue of following our chosen path, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Where will this journey lead us?

August 2, 2018

Path leading somewhere

Where will this journey lead us?” “Ideally, it will be to where we most desire to reach.”

Of course, any adventure has the possibility to turn out differently to the outcome imagined or hoped for before setting off. We may gather ideas, collect the necessary equipment – maps, sensible shoes, water, and so forth – and once feeling ready begin our trip.

In terms of life, the question ‘Where will this journey lead us?’ takes on more significance. Whilst the final destination is obvious, along the way we could encounter all manner of experiences making up what some refer to as a ‘fulfilling life’.

Using our skills, competencies and intuition we are able to cope with challenges and ensure our progress is continuous. The ups and downs add to the fabric of the moment, something also influenced by our attitude towards such things themselves.

Where will this journey lead us? In certain instances, there will be a distinct point of reference established as our objective. This might be a location in which to spend our retirement years, activities to undertake or something else entirely.

Knowing what we wish to achieve – either along the path or as a goal to be reached – keeps us focused on what is before us and, indeed, around us as appropriate.

And once we have set out on the journey there are no reasons we cannot adjust our course should it be beneficial to us to do so. After all, the journey of life is a personal one and it is only fair we live it to our potential also regarding enjoyment and satisfaction.

Right now, wherever you are, thanks for reading this ‘Where will this journey lead us?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What music would best accompany today?

July 29, 2018

Sheets of music on a wall

Some questions require no time to answer, others, such as ‘What music would best accompany today?’ may need a moment for reflection.

Looking at the day as a whole in a way does an injustice to this present moment and indeed to the part still to come. Things could have started off on the wrong foot, yet returned to normal as the day progressed leading to now in which all is rosy for instance. What music would best accompany today in this case?

On the contrary, we might be struggling to ‘get the day going’ with numerous hiccups and challenges filling our agenda even as we read this. All the same, we are probably able to select a theme tune or piece of music to the overall sensation of the day if we apply ourselves.

Letting go of single incidents – bad or good – puts the day into a more balanced perspective. So, what music would best accompany today? Personally, I’m leaning towards anything by Gil Scott-Heron. Well crafted lyrics, deep and thought-provoking in their meaning, whilst being musically moving.

My choice implies the day is tough. Rather than that, I’d say it is one in which the proverbial three steps forward are being countered by two steps back. The day is what it is so the music fits with the mood. All the same, focusing on the big picture keeps things on course.

To let me know what music would best accompany today for you, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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