Using points of references to guide our progress

October 8, 2017

Points of references

 

Without using points of references to guide our progress we can occasionally be lucky and actually arrive at our desired destination. The probability of a successful outcome to our efforts is, however, enhanced when we do go about using them.

What we take as our points of references will be related to the nature of the endeavour as well as to how we feel about it. We might wish to benchmark our progress using people we know who have gone before us. Alternatively, our progress could be measured against commonly known and widely available criteria.

Then again, we may choose specific items closely associated with the matter in question to assist us on our journey. Using points of references to guide our progress, in any case, keeps us fully focused on what we are attempting to do and where we are aiming to reach.

Whatever our way of using points of references to guide our progress, and accepting there will be times the path is tough going, we should remind ourselves often why we are aiming to move from where we are to a different location, be it physical or figurative. Clarity concerning this is a key factor to reaching our goal.

For now, thanks for being here and reading this ‘Using points of references to guide our progress’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being clear about what we want to see

October 5, 2017

Clear outlook

 

Looking in a haphazard manner is fine in certain circumstances yet being clear about what we want to see is ideal for those situations when clarity is called for.

We might find it ironic to ponder clarity from the perspective of being clear about what we want to see. In many ways perhaps it is. Nevertheless, with an intention firmly established prior to engaging in the activity of looking we will most likely find the exercise valid.

Having decided our objective for the undertaking we should not, however, believe it is enough to guarantee what we eventually see will be exactly what we hoped for. We can do our bit in the process of observing but the result does not depend entirely on us.

Being clear about what we want to see naturally influences where we go about searching. Knowing our desired outcome points us in one direction as opposed to another. If the question is related to a specific issue then this too acts as a point of reference for our activity.

Another consideration to keep in mind regarding the notion of being clear about what we want to see is that of trusting there exists the object in question to be seen. Wanting to see unicorns in the local park is one thing, actually seeing them could turn out to be a completely different matter.

To join the conversation here please feel free to leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Being clear about what we want to see’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How to manage our daily outlook

July 20, 2017

 

Irrespective of where we are, what we are doing and even why we are doing it, learning how to manage our daily outlook will play a large role in the way we experience the day. The exercise, however, can last a lifetime or be completed in the blink of an eye.

As ever, the speed of acquisition is a personal matter. And clarity concerning the benefits associated with a managed daily outlook is perhaps the first step to developing this desirable skill.

We could think of a boat drifting without direction. Any wave, current or wind would move the vessel. Yet unless the destination is unimportant, such a journey appears pointless. In a similar fashion, our outlook is a point of reference for the flow of the day.

Asking ourselves how to manage our daily outlook opens the mind to reflection. We might discover in the process a certain propensity towards one or more specific methods.

Whether it be focusing on goals to the exclusion of all else around us or using our time as constructively as possible across a range of endeavours, we need to be comfortable with any eventual changes we wish or need to implement as a result of our efforts.

If you’d like to ponder how to manage your daily outlook as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in touch.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘How to manage our daily outlook’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Question of perspectives

December 20, 2015

Perspective of stairs

Few things in life escape being classified loosely as a question of perspectives. How we feel about something, or someone, often depends on the moment together with a whole host of supporting factors.

The answer ‘A question of perspectives” might be given to explain a multitude of situations in meetings around the world. And possibly rightly so. What is good for this moment may be poor for that one and vice versa. Absolutes appear rare in today’s world.

Looking at challenges and opportunities alike often comes down to a question of perspectives. Great strides taking us forward are found at times only after we have taken two steps backwards. Clarity of choices comes with the courage to choose, so to speak.

Yet the result perhaps turns out to be less than wonderful if measured against what would have occurred had we remained where we were initially. A question of perspectives indeed. And on and on we can go. Giving ourselves time to explore an issue is itself a question of perspectives.

On the one hand it could be right for us to just ‘live the moment’, letting go of wanting to analyse away what is before us. On the other hand, reflection allows us to see so much more of an issue. Finding the right balance is a question of perspectives.

To share your input on this ‘Question of perspectives‘ post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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