Filling the gap between wanting and having

January 18, 2018

Gaps in the pavement

 

Filling the gap between wanting and having can be an endless task. With so many ‘must have’ products and services being made available every day, the task of keeping up with our wishes and desires is monumental and even maddening.

The adage of ‘wanting what you have’ may help in our efforts of filling the gap between wanting and having to optimise our actual possessions and such like.

By embracing more of what is already part of our lifestyle we might discover there is little else we actually need or indeed really want. Abundance is a mindset some folk say.

Other perspectives worth exploring, with regard to the idea of filling the gap between wanting and having, could form part of a complimentary coaching session via Skype or Google+ hangout. If you are interested in this opportunity, please get in touch.

In any case, thanks for connecting here and reading this post related to the idea of ‘filling the gap between wanting and having.’

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon

 

Advertisements

What will you do differently this time around?

January 11, 2018

Bike with flowers

The goals are set, plans are in place and intentions are good. Yet we can imagine this was the case last year too. So, what will you do differently this time around?

Is extra effort going to be given to ‘completing more’ instead of ‘starting lots’?

Perhaps attention is now on our strategic long-term objective rather than concentrating on tactical day-to-day actions.

Pondering the question ‘What will you do differently this time around?’ might be, in itself, a major shift in our mindset. Linking action to priorities will additionally add value to later efforts.

If past goals were regularly achieved then there may be no reason to do anything differently this time around. “What will you do differently this time around?” “Nothing at all.”

Changing for the sake of changing seems a waste of time and energy. That said, to take into account new input, modified circumstances and an enhanced vision of how we wish to live our potential this year, tweaking and adjusting could be called for.

Being clear about our strengths and weaknesses gives us a base to work from over the coming months. For now, it is enough to listen to your answer as you go about answering the inquiry ‘What will you do differently this time around?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


Are we resonating with the world around us?

January 7, 2018

 

Streets around us

Questions leading to a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answer leave little space for in-depth reflection. Yet in certain cases, our answer is clear to us and we are able to cope without the benefit of such pondering. The inquiry ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ cuts to the core of our outlook, deserving a few words here.

With our goals set, plans in place and efforts focused, it is easy to be unconcerned with anything attempting to distract us from our endeavour. At such times, we offer a resounding ‘No’ to the query ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ We are ‘in the zone’ and able to ignore everything else.

Still, even when we are concentrated on achieving this or that, our presence and awareness is part of the world around us. Resonating with it – without getting wrapped up in events and situations we have little or no control over – is an option worth, at least, evaluating.

As ever, other perspectives are available to us. Spending a few moments exploring these could change our response to the initial question ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Are we resonating with the world around us?’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


To what extent will this matter tomorrow?

January 4, 2018

Dark clouds

 

One way we can keep things in perspective is to ask ourselves “To what extent will this matter tomorrow?” In a world changing faster than ever it seems, this simple enquiry may just keep us connected to what is really important.

Pondering the question ‘To what extent will this matter tomorrow?‘ and then listening attentively to our response ensures present efforts are fully focused on priorities.

Being guided by a structured programme, albeit with an element of flexibility incorporated into it most likely, helps us to reach our objectives.

To what extent will this matter tomorrow?” For many, who operate according to the concept of giving proverbial oil to whatever door squeaks the loudest, the response is perhaps “It probably won’t.”

Doing this or that in a haphazard fashion invariably saps energy, rendering any output mechanical and listless at best.

That said, many things we are dealing with now will matter tomorrow. Though overused, the saying “We are building tomorrow today” holds true.

To explore the challenges, choices and/or opportunities you are currently facing as part of a complimentary coaching session, via Skype or Google+ hangout, get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this To what extent will this matter tomorrow? post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


Reflecting on progress achieved this past year

December 31, 2017

Two people reflecting

 

Reflecting on progress achieved this past year, I wonder what strikes you the most. Your view of the various successes representing twelve months worth of effort will be very much a personal indicator of how you have lived this year.

Highlights in any specific area of life, including work, may suggest where you focused your attention. On the other hand, certain triumphs could have been forthcoming despite circumstances not being the most opportune. Once again, reflecting on progress achieved this past year is an individual matter.

Regarding any endeavours in which progress was slightly less than hoped for, what additional actions are you planning to implement next year? Seeing where we are now with goal-getting activities planned last year provides input for next year’s plans.

A wider investigation into how the year has been would possibly include our level of general satisfaction in addition to examining the extent we moved nearer to our main overarching life purpose. Reflecting on progress this past year can indeed involve also these items.

As this year draws to a close there is little else to say on the issue of reflecting on progress achieved this past year. So, thank you for being here and good luck with your efforts for the coming year.

Happy 2018.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


Simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation

December 28, 2017

Chips as a simple pleasure

 

A whole host of things may come to mind when pondering simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation. Eating chips on the pier is only one possibility. Naturally, we all get to define what is meant by ‘moderation’ as each of us has our own ideas about such things.

Right now, putting down the snack, I’ll limit the list of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation to just two.

The first of the two simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation is that of spending quality time in the company of people we feel totally at ease with and who, in their turn, feel equally comfortable with us. This is something so basic yet overlooked perhaps over the year as goal chasing and the like occupy our attention.

We might say we are working for these people and are busy for their sake but, without actually spending time in their company, our efforts possibly appear hollow at best. Giving them our time is probably more appreciated than any tangible objects offered to them as substitutes for our actual presence.

The second item on the list of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation is that of getting outside to embrace nature in whatever format is most appealing to us. This could be a walk, a run, a cycle ride or any other form imaginable. The advantages of ‘blowing away the cobwebs’ will be felt immediately and can last for ages.

To share your input on the issue of simple pleasures enjoyed in moderation, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


Shutting up shop to take a break

December 17, 2017

Shops shutting up

 

Having pushed ourselves for most of the year to date it is perhaps natural that at this point we turn our attention to shutting up shop to take a break.

Ideally, we will have already reached our annual targets and consolidated our position for a strong showing anew next year. Right now, rather than running ourselves into the ground, shutting up shop to take a break might seem a sensible option to take up.

A period of rest and recuperation is possibly a form of reward for all we have achieved over the past twelve months. Without suggesting we should close down our activities completely for an extended time, a few days off will surely hurt nobody as we at least recharge our batteries fully.

The idea of shutting up shop to take a break could shock some folk, especially those not used to operating at anything less than full pelt. That said, there are occasions a moment of downtime can be the most productive action to undertake for the sake and benefit of future ongoing success.

We need not feel guilty about shutting up shop to take a break. Enjoying a quiet time to catch our breath, may also be considered a form of working. Without being able to offer our best self after the break the business will suffer. Shutting up shop to take a break is, therefore, more than symbolic. It is also strategic.

Not wishing to labour the point, particularly if you are in the process of shutting up shop to take a break, I will pause now.

Happy Holidays.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

Twitter iconWebsite icon

Amazon icon

IG icon


%d bloggers like this: