Communicating from the heart

November 10, 2019

It might be fair to suggest we are always communicating from the heart. After all, what value is there in any other form of communication?

That said, to underline the importance of communicating from the heart, let’s explore a few of the benefits we gain when we do engage in this practice.

Benefits of communicating from the heart.

1) Our words speak for us, with authenticity.

2) There is no dissonance between our intentions and our messages.

3) We invite others to communicate with us in a similar fashion, leading to open connections.

Undoubtedly, there are other advantages to communicating from the heart. If you’d like to join the conversation here with your input, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Communicating from the heart’ post and please feel free to like/share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Why listening is a key skill for us all

February 22, 2018

Listening to Verdi statute

 

Why listening is a key skill for us all can be explained with three simple reasons, clichés yet valid in any case.

1) It is difficult to learn anything new when we are speaking. By listening to others, and indeed at times also to our heart, we are able to connect with ideas that are either new in themselves or add an extra dimension to our existing pool of information.

2) By listening, we give ourselves the chance to process what is being said, and not said, to better prepare our eventual response or input. Jumping in, on the contrary, could mean we miss the speaker’s point and end up feeling foolish.

3) Demonstrating our presence in the moment, we show the speaker respect by actively listening as opposed to merely waiting to add our ‘two pennies’ to the conversation. Whilst contributing is, in the correct measure, an essential part of the interaction, the matter of balance is fundamental.

These three reasons, we might say then, set out why listening is a key skill for us all. If you’d like to share your thoughts on the question of listening, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

In the meantime, thanks for being here today and reading this ‘Why listening is a key skill for us all’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Writing on the wall

October 2, 2016

Writing on the wall

“The limits of others need not be ours” says the writing on the wall. #bgdtcoaching.

Some things are apparently so obvious it would seem the writing on the wall is spelling it out to all and sundry.

That the actual writing on the wall is there in the first place need not distract us right now. Various people choose to communicate in this format. It is a choice we could say and leave it at that. The rights and/or wrongs of writing on the wall can be left to another day, perhaps.

Transmitting a message to either a single individual or society at large is possibly the objective of those writing on the wall. The impact is surely immediate for folk in the vicinity of the wall. Appreciation, however, may not always be so forthcoming.

That said, as with most issues related to human behaviour, generalities should not be held up as hard and fast rules or gilt-edged certainties. The writing on the wall need not necessary be taken at face value. A moment of verification is wise to avoid upset or delusion later on.

So yes, the limits of others need not be ours. Rather than writing on the wall, to share your input on the points raised here, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Communication

December 21, 2014

Shoes

Communication from the heart transmits more than mere words can ever do.” #bgdtcoaching.

Communication is something we are all engaged in continuously. Indeed many activities are no longer even considered as communication, just part of daily life: updating Facebook, tweeting, texting and so forth. Additionally we can consider the messages transmitted by our actions, choice of clothes and friends and the like as important forms of communication.

From a work perspective, communication is essential to the smooth and successful running of any enterprise, impacting on workplace performance.

Stakeholders need to be kept informed, ideally in a timely manner, of events and issues impacting the organization. And being part of a communication network is itself a way of strengthening relationships among interested parties.

We all like to know what is going on and if we are to be in a position to do our best, give our all, communication is a prerequisite to this. And it is always worth remembering communication from the heart transmits more than mere words can ever do.

For now, thank you for connecting here. To join the conversation on the subject of communication, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Communicating successfully

September 7, 2014

Mailboxes

Communicating successfully is as much a question of medium as message.” #bgdtcoaching.

Communicating successfully is undoubtedly an art as well as a science. The basics are most likely clear to all. Indeed given the extent many folk live in constant connection with others, communicating successfully is possibly not even an objective, but rather a fact.

Yet communicating successfully presupposes we have something worth communicating. Also that we have taken the recipients’ needs into consideration when putting together the message, in addition to pondering the medium for its effective transmission.

However, junk filled letterboxes and email accounts full of spam suggest not all communication efforts are valid. That said, looking around us now we can most likely note a number of communication tools to hand, all ensuring we are in touch with the world.

In terms of communicating successfully, that you are here today means something has functioned. If you’d like to join the conversation on the question of communicating successfully, please leave a comment below.

Best wishes to you.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reflections

October 15, 2009

Tempering Frustration

 Confucius once said, “It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop.”

 

As renovation work on the apartment block in which I live has been ongoing since the beginning of June, I imagine the executives of the building company are followers of the great man.

Joking aside, the underlying issue from our perspective has become the lack of trustworthy communication. Project details naturally need to be amended as the works progress; we understand the builders who have had to face the intensity of the Italian summer heat and now the cold of autumn are powerless to provide specific information, but the silence from ‘reliable sources’ concerning completion grows louder.

Often October in Italy is characterized by inclement weather. Replacing marble surrounds and tiles on balconies, completing the painting of external walls of the three-storey condominium and generally ‘finishing up’ requires relatively fine weather one would imagine. Guaranteeing a series of such days is now not so certain if compared with June, July or August.

One can argue that the undertaking was desired by us, true. The building administrator is our chosen representative for dealings with the appointed company, true again. Yet I can’t help feeling everyone involved in the project, including ourselves as paying clients of the administrator and building company, needs to assess how the project could have been handled better.

A simple note left on the main door indicating the time of the next inspection for measurements or perhaps a weekly briefing posted on the communal notice-board explaining why certain tasks need to be halted, and for how long, would allay growing annoyance and bad feelings.

Being told “It’s not down to me” is frustrating in any situation.

Such an assessment would be useful for future projects. The biggest lessons, however, have been already learnt: ‘trust, but verify’ and ‘get it in writing’.

As always, I look forward to hearing from you.

Ciao for now.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


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