Building on what we already have

December 1, 2019

When undertaking a task, awareness of where we are and how we reached this position may be viewed as a starting point for development. Rather than automatically beginning from scratch, we should not overlook the option of building on what we already have.

Building on what we already have ensures we learn from past efforts for the benefit of fulfilling future objectives. In this manner, we are using yesterday’s work as momentum for our ongoing efforts.

Building on what we already have is, additionally, a way to acknowledge the presence in our toolbox of several crucial items such as experience, skills, competencies and learning acquired from previous activities.

To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below.

In any case, thanks for stopping by to read this ‘Building on what we already have’ post and don’t hesitate to like and share it.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Success starts with us putting the basics in place

March 7, 2019

Whether it’s launching a business, organising a celebration or planning a few days away, success starts with us putting the basics in place.

Nowadays there is the habit to rush things, impatience being the modern mindset we might say. Yet rarely are the outcomes of such endeavours in line with expectations. After all, success starts with us putting the basics in place, no?

It could be difficult for us to recall the days gone by in which we were beginners regarding this or that activity. However, few of us were born with the ability to speak numerous languages immediately, bake a Victorian sponge or paint like Hopper. We had to learn, make mistakes and give ourselves time to improve.

Back then, we appreciated, in a sense, the notion that success starts with us putting the basics in place. That we may have forgotten this only creates stress for us now as we attempt anything new.

Or not. Perhaps everything comes down to luck. To share your thoughts on the idea that success starts with us putting the basics in place, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?

February 7, 2019

Whether we take the idea of ‘singing’ at face value or not, it is worth asking is it really our job to teach the world to sing?

All teachers, leaders, mentors and development agents have the responsibility to transmit knowledge to the best of their ability. Outside of the formal structure of the said roles, however, we enter a grey area.

As much as we might wish to help everyone, if we fail to consider carefully the enquiry ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ we risk to a) force learning on those who are not interested in having it and/or b) burn ourselves out attempting the thankless task.

On the other hand, when we are in a position to help, it is no bad thing to do all we can within our ability. In such circumstances, holding back from reaching out does not mean we are being cautious but rather cold-hearted.

Yet if we live by the intention to do all we can whenever possible, asking ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ becomes meaningless.

Regardless of where you stand on the ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ issue, thanks for connecting here today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Focusing effort on specific areas of development

November 11, 2018

Watering cans for development

We may wish to grow ‘generally speaking’, yet focusing effort on specific areas of development offers us a greater probability of success.

The idea of focusing effort on specific areas of development is perhaps linked to the way we would approach a garden, vegetable patch or allotment – the modern day British equivalent of the victory garden.

Taking the space before us as one large plot could mean we over tend certain parts whilst giving insufficient attention to others. Life is pretty much the same. Knowing when to step in and when to stand aside is a key skill to apply in the fields (pun intended) of personal and professional development.

Focusing effort on specific areas of development can act as a catalyst for such noted benefits across the whole spectrum. The work we give to receiving technical knowledge might be paid back when we need to apply the newly acquired know-how in other areas. Learning for one specific area, therefore, helps us in subsequent endeavours.

The mental discipline of focusing effort on specific areas of development rather than scattering time and energy as a ‘hit and miss’ basis is itself a talent worthy of enhancement. Being able to direct our input with pinpoint precision gives us the chance to use our resume for the best effect.

Thanks for reading this post today. If you’d like to share your input on the issue of focusing effort on specific areas of development, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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