How focused are we on what is really important?

August 11, 2019

Questions regularly crop up in these blog posts, so let’s continue the habit with this one: ‘How focused are we on what is really important?

Our answer to the inquiry ‘How focused are we on what is really important?’ will depend on our rapport with heartfelt goals, plus our ability to schedule priorities. Provided we are clear about what we want to achieve and base our endeavours on this, our focus will automatically be on what is really important to us.

At varying moments of the year, we may be obliged to spend time on matters not directly related to our core goals. Nevertheless, even in these instances, we need not lose sight of our overarching objectives.

There is no reason to be despondent just because we have to work on less strategic issues once in a while. And, provided it is only ‘once in a while’, we shouldn’t worry about not dedicating all our time to our key concerns. 100% remains the response to ‘How focused are we on what is really important?

Anyway, enough of my thoughts on the issue ‘How focused are we on what is really important?’ To share your input, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How our surroundings impact on us

September 17, 2017

Surroundings impacting on us

 

To discover how our surroundings impact on us we might wish to first explore where we are exactly right now.

Rather than being in the location shown in the picture, I am drafting this sitting in one of the staff rooms at the university in Milan. The furnishings and fixtures all mirror the status of the institution. As colleagues go about their business around me, I am letting the pencil dance across the A4 notebook I use to capture ideas for these posts.

It is possible you are reading this whilst on the move. The people around you may be strangers to you or folk you know well. The location is ideally pleasant and perhaps also creatively stimulating, depending on the nature of what you are doing there.

How our surroundings impact on us then perhaps is much to do with how we feel where we are and linked closely to the objects and the people there with us.

We are, in any case, capable of blocking out the world and ignoring our senses to focus fully on a matter irrespective of our locality. In these instances ‘How our surroundings impact on us’ is no longer a valid exploration as we are immune, so to speak, from the surroundings and their influence on us.

Of course, the individual aspect of where we are renders any inquiry to how our surroundings impact on us personal to each of us. In any case, thanks for spending a few minutes of your time reading this ‘How our surroundings impact on us’.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Focus: morning, noon and night

August 1, 2013

“Opportunities arrive when the mind is focused on heartfelt goals.” #bgdtcoaching.

Focus is considered a fundamental component for achieving success in any endeavour we undertake. Yet keeping ourselves focused is not easy, especially if we are not so interested in the activity in question.

That said, working on heartfelt goals invariably creates the conditions for us to focus morning, noon and night.

Brighton Beach in the morning

Morning. A thrilling goal gets our feet tingling and provides focus right from the moment we awake. Opportunities are waiting for us and we can’t wait to reach out to them.

Brighton Beach at noon

Noon. With our focus consolidated by our actions, we may find ourselves going about our activities with a smile on our face lighting up the north, the south, the east and the west. We are focused and fully engaged on obtaining our objectives.

Brighton Beach at night

Night. Though the day has slipped into night, our focus offers us reserves of energy. Our heartfelt goals are before us and sleep is not an option as adrenaline carries us forward.

Maybe the day has passed too quickly and our goals have eluded us today. Certain issues could require additional input, but tomorrow is another day and quoting from ‘The turning wheel’ vlog post (click here to read/view), “With focused attention this time around we might see meaning and significance in the sights surrounding us.”

Thanks for connecting here today. To join the focus conversation, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

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Reflections – Focus

February 17, 2011

In a world which places much importance on measuring and determining the value of an action from the results obtained, focusing on the outcome when tasked to do something is understandable.

Focusing exclusively on the end

Yet focusing exclusively on the end, might mean we miss the actual moment of doing the task. It can be argued provided we get the thing done it doesn’t matter. Perhaps that is right, although there will be times when how we do something is important too.

Multitasking or rudeness?

I can remember an occasion a bank teller dealt with my query as she focused on a report on her desk. When I asked if I should return at a more convenient time, I was met with a frosty reply that she was very capable of multitasking. I now bank online.

Lack of focus

The lack of focus or ‘shoddiness of craftsmanship’ as my grandfather would have said, shows up everywhere nowadays. Details get taken down in a haphazard way. The spelling of names and noting of account numbers are likewise hit or miss affairs over the phone.

Being focused

If we are honest we know when we are doing something with little or no focus. Although we might think otherwise, others also notice when we are ‘going through the motions’ as we ponder what’s for dinner or make mental plans for the weekend.

The Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh sums up being mindful of what we are doing with the concept of ‘Washing the dishes to wash the dishes’, being completely focused on the fact one is washing the dishes, rather than mentally rushing to the next thing to be done.

As ever, other perspectives are possible. I’d love to hear your opinions on the issue of focus, so please feel free to leave a comment below.

Thanks for connecting.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


Reflections

March 4, 2010

Mindfully Playing Roles

For years I’ve dreamed of being involved in a company in which each person undertakes tasks purely in accordance with their skill, passion and love. A numbers expert would not be expected to sell, the IT tech need not be concerned with marketing and so forth. And yes, a coordination expert would be responsible for keeping it all flowing.

The idea need not be limited to the workplace. It could be argued if we apply the concept to our lives we can channel our efforts to perform to our highest level, in each role we are required to play – mother, father, employer, chef, procurement officer (shopper), loving partner, etc. – thus maximizing our involvement and enjoyment moment by moment.

Concentrating on where we are and on what we are doing right now would eliminate the vacant sensation of ‘going through the motions’ whilst thinking about the next appointment, meeting, shopping trip or whatever.

And let’s not forget the impact such behaviour would have on those around us if we truly showed up in their presence.

Is it possible to live in such a way in these days of multitasking and various digital devices supposedly so vital to us nowadays?

As always it comes down to personal choice with each of us evaluating the benefits or otherwise of how we have operated to date. Accepting the status quo for a ‘a quite life’ is only a choice when we weigh up alternatives. Without that personal input it seems to me Jim Rohn’s words below aren’t for us.

“Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else’s hands, but not you.”

Being 100% present means not being small, nor does it entail frittering away time starting lots of tasks but concluding none. It is being mindful of the now and living each instance to its fullest, knowing ‘it too shall pass’.

Keep in touch.

Brian.

2010, dedicated to helping clients optimize their potential. www.bgdtcoaching.com


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