When to let go of holding on

January 6, 2019

The initial days of the new year are still in our minds yet possibly the idea of when to let go of holding on to unhealthy habits and the like is already fading as we get caught up in our old routine.

We are in essence the sum of our habits, thoughts, dreams and actions and provided these items are creating our desired life all is good. But whatever the situation, being conscious of when to let go of holding on keeps us in good stead, today and surely for the rest of the year.

We instinctively know what areas of life we need to review with regard to our habits and actions. Those we are unhappy with, or at least not convinced are still in our best interest, will be prime candidates to be let go of.

The key, however, might reside in the word ‘when’ of the enquiry ‘when to let go of holding on’. Timing plays an important role in managing our efforts to take full advantage of habits, plus giving us input about the best moment to let go of it.

The Japanese saying “Hold tight, release immediately” comes to mind to best sum up the thinking.

For now, thanks for being here and for reading this ‘When to let go of holding on’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent are we anchored by old habits?

August 12, 2018

Anchor monument

Doing things ‘because we have always done them’ or ‘because everyone does’ are two phrases indicating the question ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ needs to be asked.

Tried and tested routines help us navigate known water in the shape of familiar challenges. Applying old habits frees us to focus attention on more testing waters. All the same, the idea of us being blocked, limited, restricted or anchored by our approach towards life is another thing.

On a micro level, we may discover a better restaurant around the corner from our usual lunchtime haunt. There might be much to be gained by reducing our television intake if we harness the willpower to avoid the sofa immediately after our evening meal. And so on and so on.

On a macro level, to what extent are we anchored by old habits? Well possibly to the extent we feel life has something more to offer us, or better we have something more to offer life. Unleashing our potential, in the form of doing something new, could even widen our horizons.

If you’d like to explore further the inquiry ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ in the form of a complimentary coaching conversation, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘To what extent are we anchored by old habits?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Same old record

May 22, 2014

Old record

“As the same old record plays the same old song,

habits give us the habitual outcome.” #bgdtcoaching.

It is well known that to get a different result we need to play a new tune instead of the same old record. We all have the capacity to expand ourselves beyond the limits of our experience right now.

Enhancing our potential could be a case of noting our weaknesses and undertaking a specific programme of development to improve our skills. With the almost endless opportunities available to most of us nowadays, such an investment of time and effort is not impossible to us.

That said, we can often hear folk repeat the same old record regarding a lack of ………………………………………. (fill in the blank according to the excuse of the moment, be it a weak economy, limited time for personal and professional development, an inability to stick to a learning schedule, etc.).

The same old record gets aired so often, also as justification at national and international levels, that it is little wonder inertia, procrastination and a sense of helplessness trickles down to individuals.

Same old record or not if we choose to change the music to which we move.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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