Packing up

June 28, 2015

 

Packing up

Getting things together, sorting what needs sorting and packing up everything is a way of moving forward for some people. Packing up goods no longer required can be liberating.

Rather than actually letting go of these items – something probably actually worth considering in many instances – packing up the things and putting them away lessens some of the resistance and upset associated with moments of change.

Packing up might also be applied to intangible objects. We may choose to ponder packing up certain habits, smoking coming first to mind. Yet as a non-smoker all I would say here is that if some folk have managed to give up the habit it’s likely others too have the capacity, no?

Taking greater control of how we use our time could mean packing up, or at least reducing, time spent on activities keeping us from working on our heartfelt goals. As I wrote some time ago on Twitter (@bgdtcoaching), “It is not true others have more time than us, they just use it differently.”

Anyway, before packing up here today, let me thank you for reading this post. To join the conversation, please feel free to leave a comment below. If you’d like to discuss the idea of packing up habits as part of a coaching conversation, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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Part of today

October 17, 2013

Seascape

“As the waves form part of the sea, our presence forms part of today.” #bgdtcoaching.

Part of today might be spent working on our goals, building our future through our actions right now. Managing our time in a way to give our goals quality attention is an indicator of our desire to reach them.

Time may also be given over to any number of tasks necessary for the ‘general maintenance’ of life. Such tasks could be considered a nuisance as they don’t actually enhance our position at all, but that doesn’t change the fact they have to be done and form part of today.

Part of today has gone already and those seconds, minutes and hours making up the day until this moment have become elements of our history. To what extent did we use them well? What lessons have we learnt from their passing? How will the learning help us for the rest of the day?

No matter how we answer these questions, part of today is still before us and, hopefully, we are in a position to use it as we wish.

Thanks for spending part of today here. If you’d like to share your thoughts on the issues touched upon in this part of today post, please leave a comment below.

Best wishes.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.
As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reflections

May 24, 2010

Expressing Priorities

I love the simplicity and directness of the Gandhi quotation “action expresses priorities.”

We can talk about what we want to do, we can even list the items and ponder them for ages. Yet nothing gets done until we do it. If asked, we could state what our priorities are for today. Could we however claim to have undertaken those of yesterday, or the day before? Hopefully yes.

Keeping priorities in mind helps focus attention on our objectives. Yet fighting the temptation to open e-mails as soon as they arrive, ignore a ringing telephone or leave interesting but not important requests from colleagues until a more appropriate time takes discipline and will-power.

Saying no to certain matters may seem like hard work. An alternative strategy is to deal with things as they crop up, swimming our way through the sea of urgent demands on our time by those around us. If we opt for this strategy, however, we can’t complain when we reach the end of the day and discover we haven’t achieved everything we had intended to do. The choice is ours, as always.

Breaking the day down into blocks of time and allocating certain moments for specific items or actions might be a step forward for some in the ‘battle’ to maximize our time. Likewise, remembering the purpose of our priorities could provide the determination to complete our chosen tasks, as, when and how we decide.

Time management, or time leadership as it is known in certain circles, involves many ideas, tips, suggestions and hints. If you have any particular methods you’d like to share here, or indeed any thoughts concerning this subject, I’d love to hear from you.

Happy implementation of your objectives!

Brian
http://www.bgdtcoaching.com


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