What will you do differently this time around?

January 11, 2018

Bike with flowers

The goals are set, plans are in place and intentions are good. Yet we can imagine this was the case last year too. So, what will you do differently this time around?

Is extra effort going to be given to ‘completing more’ instead of ‘starting lots’?

Perhaps attention is now on our strategic long-term objective rather than concentrating on tactical day-to-day actions.

Pondering the question ‘What will you do differently this time around?’ might be, in itself, a major shift in our mindset. Linking action to priorities will additionally add value to later efforts.

If past goals were regularly achieved then there may be no reason to do anything differently this time around. “What will you do differently this time around?” “Nothing at all.”

Changing for the sake of changing seems a waste of time and energy. That said, to take into account new input, modified circumstances and an enhanced vision of how we wish to live our potential this year, tweaking and adjusting could be called for.

Being clear about our strengths and weaknesses gives us a base to work from over the coming months. For now, it is enough to listen to your answer as you go about answering the inquiry ‘What will you do differently this time around?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Work is work

May 26, 2016

Man at work sign

Setting aside issues regarding pay, hours and general conditions of employment – valid points worthy of consideration nonetheless – we could ponder whether work is work when we are engaged in an activity we love doing.

Is it fair to say work is work as we go about researching some information if data gathering provides a stimulating challenge to us? Being up to our knees in brambles as we clear the garden for a loved one, yet feeling so alive, doesn’t seem right labelled as ‘work’.

The enjoyment we obtain from a variety of roles possibly gives to the idea of work is work a new perspective. Our attitude to whatever it is we are dealing with right now, in terms of how we are spending the working day, perhaps holds the key to how we perceive the task in question.

Work is work, yes, but we need not fall into the negative mindset of others and automatically dismiss this time of our life as being just a moment to ‘get through’. We can choose to embrace it and, in doing so, might find we are happy wherever we are and however we are using time.

I’d love to learn your thoughts on the issue of ‘work is work‘, so please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Boat load of

May 15, 2016

Boat load of flowers

With a boat load of time options are expanded. With a boat load of options efforts can be effective.

Yet how do we go about generating that initial boat load of time? Respecting the priorities and commitments of everyone here, the following general ideas might be of some value right now.

A simple way to create free time is to up our awareness of the value of our time. The use we give to the day impacts not only on how we live it, but also on our experience of life tomorrow. By respecting each moment we most likely begin to prioritize actions for the sake of achieving more key objectives.

Prioritizing invariably also leads to a better understanding of options available. Seeing how each item fits into the so-called ‘grand scheme’ of things gives us a wider perspective if compared to when we ‘flit from this to that’. Our boat load of time as such becomes a valuable resource to use as necessary.

Freeing up time is not just about scheduling tasks however. We may choose to drop certain activities if they are no longer serving our life purpose. Small changes in habits have the knock-on effect of building a new way of being and, again, this could be viewed as being part of our resources.

Furthermore, we have the freedom to implement changes to more specific items such as social media usage, television watching and the time spent at the coffee vending machine at work. Managing input in these areas possibly provides us with a boat load of time for more strategic activities.

Or maybe not. As ever, it is for us to evaluate how best we use our boat load of time and live our life.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Against the wall

March 30, 2016

Table and chairs against the wall

Prior to engaging with our task of the moment, we might find ourselves waiting against the wall, so to speak, in anticipation of our entry on stage.

From this position against the wall we are able, if we so choose, to observe the goings on around us and perhaps even make any last minute tweaks to help us perform to our best when eventually called upon to initiate our work.

Though the place against the wall could be considered by some as being restrictive, from here we get the chance to collect our thoughts. This action is so often rare once our activities are underway. Indeed today for most of us such time is a premium, especially in the workplace.

Being against the wall, from a different perspective, is the proverbial place we find ourselves in when facing challenges along the path to our objections. Instinct may suggest we need to retrace our steps to seek an alternative route forward. Intuition possibly pushes us to look beyond the immediate to see the learning opportunity.

Whatever course we decide to follow, our time against the wall is not going to last forever so we need not fret and worry. Trusting ourselves to overcome the latest obstacle, as we have done to reach this point, is most likely a part of living up to our potential.

Many thanks for reading this post today. To join the conversation about the issue of being against the wall, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Waiting for

February 25, 2016

Taxi waiting for a client

Sitting around, waiting for our cue to set the act in motion, can be a tiring occupation in itself. Time moves at a snail’s march, it sometimes seems, as we hang around in attendance for the next opportunity to put our preparation into practice.

Regardless of our role, most jobs have elements of downtime interspersed with periods of intense activity. What we do whilst waiting for our next moment ‘of glory’ might be significant. Some may choose to merely sit around, kick their heels and chew the proverbial cud with colleagues.

Others possibly prefer to profit from the free time by either investing in ongoing learning or, if away from the workplace, undertaking leisure pursuits. In terms of using the moments we are waiting for this or that, options are only really limited to our imagination.

Waiting for something to happen could be what you have been engaging in as you read this post. In any case, let me thank you for connecting here today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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