What small changes would make big improvements for you?

July 23, 2017

I might be wrong, but I believe you know in your heart what small changes would make big improvements for you and how you experience life.

Each of us goes through the day accomplishing this and that, ticking off all the items on our To Do lists. However, many times whilst achieving much it is not unusual to feel there is something more we could or should be doing or giving.

This nagging feeling holds the key to understanding what small changes would make big improvements for you, me and all our stakeholders. Possibly we are setting our sights too low and so need to stretch ourselves. Then again, we may be staying in a role or situation just because it is easy and we feel in control.

Whilst such thinking is valid, when we really listen to our heart it can become a wake-up call for us. If not, today quickly becomes ‘five years later’ and although the enthusiasm to ‘be our best’ remains, commitments will have increased in proportion to a decrease of energy and courage to undertake any small changes.

There is no need to upset the proverbial apple cart just for the sake of doing so. Nevertheless, an amendment here and a change of habits there are doable, especially so when you have decided what small changes would make big improvements for you.

Thanks for reading this ‘What small changes would make big improvements for you?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Benefits of being our best

March 23, 2017

Best building

 

Though there are surely many benefits of being our best, having an iconic building built in our honour is not perhaps going to happen for all of us.

Putting that aside, we can look at some of the more immediate benefits of being our best.

1) Our impact represents our true abilities. Doubts about whether we could have given or done more following our interaction are kept away from our mind.

2) Our potential is displayed on the stage of life or work. We create a clear interpretation of our abilities from which we are able to either consolidate success or work on any weaknesses in our performance.

3) Provided we are constant in our efforts, one of the benefits of being our best is that stakeholders are able to rely on us to embrace fully any undertaking we are involved in.

More benefits of being our best may be connected with specific fields of activities and the like.

To share your input on the issues raised here regarding the benefits of being our best, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
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Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained Co-Active Coach and Freelance Trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


On the path

October 16, 2016

On the path

 

Wherever we are, we are on the path leading us somewhere. Before dismissing this statement as being obvious, we might wish to examine each component of it to establish its veracity.

Putting aside our physical location – I appreciate you may be reading this on one of many available platforms and indeed from a place beyond my imagination – our personal growth is itself situated on the path we have, as individuals, created for ourselves.

Our personalized development programme is set according to our heartfelt objectives and outlook on life. Being ‘on the path‘ in this way is much about being our best, pointing us to an existence in which our potential is able to shine bright.

The eventual destination our efforts will ideally lead us to could turn out to be different to the one imagined at the start of the journey on the path. Life provides its own twists and turns, some of which cannot be anticipated or planned for.

Exploration of our feelings on the path is, at times, a method to discover the attachment we have with this adventure. The presence of pleasure, curiosity and/or enthusiasm may suggest we are in actual fact on the path best suited to our true self.

So, on the path taking you towards your goals, how do you feel right now?

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

The stage of work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2016)

Performance skills at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2015)

Personal performance potential at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2013)

Reflections on performance at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2012)

Elements of theatre at work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2010)

Training through drama for work (Milan: EDUCatt, 2009)


Shining out

July 24, 2016

Sun shining out on the sea

Holding back from being our best, shining out through all we do, seems to be a common thing. Some people were perhaps brought up with the idea of keeping a low profile. Others may be uncomfortable, or at least unused to shining out, as centre stage is a new location for them.

In this age of interconnectivity and social media, shining out stands in contrast to such thinking. Yet we don’t need to be shouting from the rooftops for our efforts to speak for us. Moreover, often it is enough we know we have given our all without having to inform everyone constantly.

In actual fact, when there is no sense of personal interaction involved, for many people the results obtained are of more concern than the way they are achieved.

Although we are motivated to live our potential, we cannot expect others to do the same. At most our example of shining out might inspire them to follow suit. And if they do, acknowledging their undertaking will hopefully encourage them to continue in this direction.

To close, it is possibly worth reflecting for a few minutes on what life would be like if we were all shining out in all we did.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


At the core

July 10, 2016

Working at the core of a piazza

Being curious, we may ask what is at the core of our heart. The question need not cause consternation and discomfort. Indeed it is unnecessary for the answer to be expressed to anyone except ourselves.

However, reflecting on what is at the core of our being, and hence the motor for all actions, we are able to evaluate the alignment or otherwise of our work to our values. People might, in the first instance, suggest they are motivated merely by money.

Scratching the surface, we could discover in reality the motivation for what they do relates to the nurturing of whatever is at the core of their life. In most cases, attempting to substitute whatever is at the core with more money fails to stimulate a better performance out of us.

Indeed, reducing our efforts to just monetary terms implies we actually care little about living up to our abilities, and this is surely not so. On the contrary, most likely at the core of all we do is our desire to be our best, live our potential and embrace each moment fully.

Bringing onto the stage of work what is at the core of who we are is a way of respecting our guiding principles and connecting with those around us. Ideally they too will be operating in a similar manner, but this of course is beyond our control or direct influence.

Thanks for being here today. To join the conversation on the issues at the core of this post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Going nowhere

June 28, 2016

Pier going nowhere

 

It might seem after many days of preparation, coupled with an execution of our work to the best of our ability, we are actually going nowhere if we fail to receive the response we had hoped for. Unfortunately as much as we can manage our input, the reaction from those receiving our efforts is beyond our direct control.

Accepting this situation is a bitter pill, yet one worth the discomfort of swallowing. Free from the belief we are able to dictate how our work is received, we are in a better position to concentrate on operating to our potential. Going nowhere, in this case, is far from the truth. Ideally we are already heading in the desired direction through the undertakings we engage in, and hopefully performing successfully.

Going nowhere, on the other hand, should possibly be the label for those occasions when we let doubts and fears dominate us to the point we fail to even attempt to put on stage whatever we have been preparing so diligently. But then those moments of going nowhere are rare, no?

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


The basics

January 21, 2016

Basic fruit

“With the basics in place, the performance can flow.” #bgdtcoaching.

Each endeavour usually consists of a couple of parts: the basics and the details. Getting the basics sorted gives us the opportunity to move onto the details in a smooth and measured manner.

The basics might be initial training and practice at the start of an assignment. These items have their own timetable. Though we could be tempted to jump straight into a project, it is invariably a false time-saver. Without the basics being in place, our performance cannot flow as desired.

In terms of personal development, the basics may be the answers we give to a number of key questions about our objectives and how we wish to implement our potential.

To what extent are we happy with our current situation? What do we gain by being where we are? In which way would life be different if we were to listen more to our heart? How prepared are we to ensure our true self is, or remains, at the centre of our existence?

The basics are not always easy items to work with, yet they do indeed provide a foundation for further growth.

As each of us defines the basics according to our personal situation, there is little reason for me to labour the concept here any longer. Let me end by thanking you for reading ‘The basics‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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