Is no way absolutely better than any way?

April 2, 2017

Sign posts

 

Looking at things from the perspective of ‘All or Nothing’, ‘This or That’, can be just as limiting as grasping onto a knee-jerk answer regarding the question “Is no way absolutely better than any way?

Whether it is advisable to place trust in such a restrictive mode of thinking will perhaps become clear over the course of time.

Yet is no way absolutely better than any way? In the first instance, however, exploring options around ‘No way’ being ‘Absolutely better’ than ‘Any way’ might provide new lines of enquiry.

Expanding our vision of the issue before us – in an ideal world – requires we make our eventual decisions concerning which way to move with clear intentions after carefully investigating our options.

So, all things considered, is no way absolutely better than any way?

If you’d like to share your input or even your response to the question “Is no way absolutely better than any way?“, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained Co-Active Coach and Freelance Trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)

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How to find value among fears and doubts

February 2, 2017

Finding value

 

Being a ‘balanced person’ if that is a goal for us, can involve discovering how to find value among fears and doubts.

The presence of invariably considered negative items in our life is something to be accepted. After all, elements outside of ourselves crop up on what seems to be their own schedule. Rather than hoping we won’t encounter them, or indeed limiting beliefs arriving from the depth of our mind, we have other options.

One such choice is that of attempting to find value from them by exploring what the underlying issues are around them. Fears and doubts concerning falling short of expectations may indicate how much we are focused on living up to either our own or others’ performance guidelines.

Worries regarding the direction the future will lead us towards could signify we are uncertain about the validity of our plans. Preparation today will not guarantee a comfortable tomorrow, yet it will probably impact positively in ways unimagined beforehand.

Furthermore, we have the possibility to ponder what our fears and doubts are giving us. Are we clinging onto them as an excuse for not doing this or that? How are they influencing us on a moment by moment basis?

Other considerations along the lines of investigating how to find value among fears and doubts are surely equally interesting; if you’d like to share your input please leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Wrapped up

August 28, 2014

Wrapped up cases

“With everything wrapped up, all that is left to do is get going.” #bgdtcoaching.

It is important, indeed often wise, to think ahead and factor possible obstacles into our plans. Yet once we are ready, with everything wrapped up, any further ponderings may well mean we miss our window of opportunity to get underway. Regardless of our efforts, life moves at its own pace.

Nevertheless, having each aspect of life neatly wrapped up could be a goal for some folk. We might like the idea of going from one issue or project to another only after the first is successfully under our control.

That said, for many the reality probably means things overlap, begin and end without always respecting desired schedules. Pushing one thing forward, pulling another along at the same time, juggling last minute changes and attempting to keep the world and its brother happy is challenging.

In either scenario, with everything wrapped up, all that is left to do is get going.

So, without getting wrapped up in lots of words here, let me stop now. If you’d like to share your perspective on this Wrapped up post, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reflections – Moving forward

June 16, 2011

Keeping an eye on the past whilst moving forward might be unavoidable if sitting on a train with our back to the locomotive.

Yet, as a strategy for achieving our goals it can be somewhat distracting.

The past certainly contains many important elements which make up our current position. The places we have visited all, in a way, leave their imprint on us.

However, by looking only at where we have been may mean we miss opportunities now to reach our desired objective in the future.

The landscape of yesterday could already have been changed as we experience that of today. That of tomorrow is at present an unknown reality.

Moving forward is a journey into the future and seeing where we are headed helps ensure we arrive at our chosen destination.

And the journey itself can be enjoyed when we are certain we are on the right train as it were to the desired objective. By keeping our objective in sight, knowing where we want to get to, and indeed why, we fuel our determination to avoid getting distracted along the way.

Thanks for travelling with me today. If you would like to contact me, I can be reached by e-mail, through my website, blog or via Twitter.

Thanks again and goodbye for now.

Brian.

www.bgdtcoaching.com 


Reflections

June 7, 2010

Moving Forward, by Standing Still

Sometimes life just seems a relentless round of running around. Without time to enjoy the sense of completion of one thing, something else springs up to capture our attention. School finishes and parents are under pressure to ‘entertain’ their children for the next six or so weeks. Promotion at work is confirmed, but before we have time to find our feet a backlog of problems is passed to us.

A list of such examples would be endless but I’m sure you get the picture. Even with the benefit of modern technology to help keep track of friends, events, appointment and so forth, it can be stressing to keep our status up to date and our successes in the public eye …

Making time for ourselves is often looked upon by ‘others’ as a selfish act. Indeed, trying to satisfy the constantly shifting and never explicitly defined criteria of ‘them’ is in itself a burden beyond belief.

At some point the limit is reached, hopefully through conscious choice although a crisis often brings it to the fore, and a decision is made to start living the life we desire, not the one imposed upon us by those around us through their disdaining looks, unhelpful concerns and half-truths.

Our life is just that, ours. We are the experts on ourselves. Where we are right now is the culmination of years of choices, decisions, yes mistakes possibly, and lots of other factors both under our control and out of our hands, quite likely unknown to ‘them’.

We invariably know more about how we are in this moment and what we desire than ‘them’, so why do we give ‘them’ the power to run our lives? Because we know no other way? Because we are afraid of what ‘they’ might think if we take charge? Because we fear our potential?

Starting small, perhaps with just an hour a week, in reclaiming our lives could open all sorts of new perspectives. Standing still, as it were, outside of the game of life we usually play, might permit us to have the overview rarely available to us as we run through our schedules.

Is an hour a week, just for yourself, reasonable or selfish? Ask yourself not ‘them’ because we know what ‘they’ would say, don’t we.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


Reflections

April 13, 2010

Embracing the negative

Like me, I imagine you know one or two people who speak only in the negative. They pepper each conversation with a barrage of ‘no, never, impossible, can’t, couldn’t, won’t.’ Every idea is put down without a moment’s consideration. Life from this perspective seems so bad, restrictive, foreboding; one wonders why or indeed how we can go on.

Leaving aside such people without judging them, I’m curious about those troubling feelings the rest of us may encounter occasionally. Those negative thoughts about past events or worries about upcoming tasks. By playing these snippets over and over in our minds we pump them with energy, making them bigger to the point they impede our present. So, how can we handle them?

Resist reality
We can do nothing and let them block us from getting on with our lives. A mistake in the past can be enough to make us believe we are ‘useless’ at everything. Denying the negative feelings and worries only causes them to grow, or as Carl Gustav Jung said: “what we resist persists.”

Get moving
We can distract the negative thoughts by throwing ourselves into something we enjoy; movement of some sort usually helps for a while. It’s ‘working around the fears’ so to speak.

Embrace them, then gently move on
We can’t change the past but we can take learning from it. An upcoming activity might be testing for us, yet development comes by expanding the limits of our comfort zone. If we choose, we can acknowledge the worries as a healthy part of the growth process. After all, were we born with the ability to read, write, cook, drive, swim, paint, and sing, or did we develop such skills over time?

Preparation, belief in the possibility of success, and trust in ourselves to give our best. These elements help us let go of the negative and optimize the opportunities life provides us.

Many perspectives on such issues are possible. To open up the learning, I’d love to hear how you deal with negative thinking and worries.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


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