Happiness starts with us

April 11, 2019

As much as we might wish to think it is the job of others to make us happy, happiness starts with us and our outlook on life.

Climatic disasters happen, political decisions are made in smoky corridors and additional external factors all bombard us day in, day out. If we choose to wait for ‘everything to be sorted’ before engaging with life, we risk losing much time. For this reason alone, suggesting happiness starts with us seems justified.

The word ‘happiness’ here should not be confused with the idea that all is hunky-dory with our life and the world at large. It relates more to a mindset, an inner compass directing us towards heartfelt goals as we strive to live our life purpose whilst being our best.

Difficulties will crop up requiring our attention. That said, we can face them not as personal affronts but rather as opportunities to apply good sense to find the most acceptable solution for all concerned. Happiness starts with us as we move through life aligned with our values.

Some may say such thinking is too idealistic. Yet honestly, is seeing only the negative in each instance more realistic?

To join the conversation here on this ‘Happiness starts with us’ issue, please leave a comment below. If you’d like to use this post as input for a coaching conversation, don’t hesitate to get in contact.

For now, thanks for reading this ‘Happiness starts with us’ reflection today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Shining bright even on a rainy day

December 6, 2018

Rainy day

As many of the posts here have attested, our outlook is very much a personal one and there are few reasons not to go about shining bright even on a rainy day.

Very few instances are ever made better by giving in to the temptation of blaming external factors on our outlook on life. That some people prefer to act as if the whole world is against them is another matter.

Anyway, returning to the issue of shining bright even on a rainy day, we can list three basic considerations to support the idea.

1) Given life is testing for us all, why not attempt to lighten it a little by shining bright even on a rainy day?

2) Our ‘light’, that passion we have for life and the way we demonstrate this to the world need not be conditioned by dynamics beyond our control, especially the weather.

3) We risk to never shine brightly if we decide to wait for perfect outside conditions. Life is lived in the present, not at some unspecified time in the future.

Or not. To join the conversation here and share your thoughts on the topic of shining bright even on a rainy day, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Taking each step before us

October 18, 2018

Steps before us

Sometimes standing still is not a wise option, whereas taking each step before us represents the best way forward.

Taking each step before us and with a belief in our ability to reach our goal, need not be viewed as being ‘better than nothing’.

Focusing attention, itself a rare quality in many respects if the mindless actions all around us are an indicator of events, is akin to taking each step before us. The emphasis of our efforts is clear and we are moving in a decisive manner.

In a perfect world, we will be certain of where the steps before us lead to. Unfortunately, or not depending on the perspective, surprises occur. What starts as an intention to reach point B may end up getting us to point C, D or Z.

Action, in any case, is the key to progress once strategic intentions have been clarified and used to create tactical plans for their eventual realization.

Reading back these last few lines, this seems to imply we are discussing a major military campaign as opposed to a pleasant embracing of opportunities before us. Maybe the moment feels intense although, as ever, it is ours to live in the manner most befitting our values, goals and outlook in general.

Thanks for reading this and please feel free to share your thoughts on the question of taking each step before us by leaving a comment below if you wish.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Positive, negative or neutral outlook?

May 10, 2018

Positive outlook on a beach

Depending on a whole set of factors, unique to each of us at any given time, we may choose to ask ourselves or not whether we have right now a positive, negative or neutral outlook.

Just as the timing of the enquiry is a personal issue, our response will likewise reflect our individual mindset, again associated with how we perceive the moment. Of course, it could also be interesting to actually examine what is a positive negative or neutral outlook.

It would, however, be only an academic investigation as I am sure, at least in our heart, we know what we mean by a positive, negative or neutral outlook, no?

So, getting back to how we are experiencing the current moment, based on all the above-mentioned provisos, what learning can we take from the present? If now is the base for later, what do we need to undertake to ensure tomorrow is an improvement on today?

Questions galore, but ones with the capacity to possibly move us nearer to our heartfelt goals. And after all, unless we are already being, doing and having all we wish for, why shouldn’t we let these queries spur us onwards?

Thanks for connecting here today and deciding to read this ‘Positive, negative or neutral outlook?’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Being accountable to our values

March 22, 2018

Closed sign

Feeling obliged to justify our outlook on life suggests others are attempting to control or manipulate us.

That said, being accountable to our values is something requiring a personal input. We are guided, implicitly or explicitly, by our set of heartfelt values and mostly our actions flow from them rather than as opposed to them.

Being accountable to our values might come across as outdated nowadays if we buy into the prevalent instant gratification mindset of society in general.

Nevertheless, there are many people – you and me, for example – who prefer to navigate through life guided by what we hold dear even at the cost of appearing ‘out of sync’ with the world at large.

‘More’ does not always equal ‘ Better’. ‘Later’ can be preferable to ‘Now’, if it means concentrating on ‘Important’ issues to us, rather than those issues merely ‘Urgent’ to other people.

Before you leave this ‘Being accountable to our values’ post, let me just acknowledge you for your presence here and encourage you to keep being you.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Dark day

December 4, 2016

 

A dark day

Just as a ‘bright day’ can occur without the necessity of fine weather, a ‘dark day‘ likewise is not tied to climatic conditions. In any case, we are able to embrace both the positive and negative elements of the moment and act accordingly.

Looking more clearly at what we may wish to label a dark day opens the way to learning. Certain lessons can appear as we delve into the testing moment. It may not turn out to be wonderful, but possibly at least beneficial to our development.

A special attitude is not particularly called for, merely one capable of seeing beyond the negative first instance. It is an ability we all surely have, and one worth exercising regularly.

Observing the day through neutral eyes reveals the moment in its fullness. What at first came across as a dark day in this situation will be assessed more carefully. Just as a tough day holds learning, the so-called ‘bright days’ hold elements of difficulty too. Within each day the whole spectrum of life can be found.

Of course, what constitutes a dark day for one person could be labelled as a bright day for another person from his or her perspective. The outlook sets the tone. To share your input on the issue put forward here, please leave a comment below.

Thanks for reading this, hopefully not on a dark day for you.

Brian.

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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


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