Anticipating the moment

September 15, 2016

Waiting for a performance

 

By placing something in the agenda, or noting it as a forthcoming item, we are in a sense anticipating the moment of its arrival.

Looking at the issue of anticipating the moment from a positive perspective, we might wish to highlight the way in which we mentally rehearse the instance in question. The visualization of a desired moment is a key element of preparing for it.

Giving ourselves sufficient time to approach a deadline, scheduled activity or the like in a serene mode is another form of anticipating the moment in a proactive manner. As we most likely know – to a general extent at least – our commitments over the coming few months, there is little reason to be caught out, unprepared for this or that.

In terms of waiting in the wings ahead of stepping onto the proverbial stage to perform our work, we can go about anticipating the moment as an opportunity to centre ourselves in the present and focus attention on executing the upcoming task to the best of our abilities.

Once the moment we have been anticipating actually arrives, we may choose to let go of any lingering fears, doubts and/or negative thinking about our effort and embrace fully the here and now. By doing so we give respect, it could be argued, to the time previously spent anticipating the moment.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 

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Centre of the moment

May 8, 2016

Duck in the centre of the moment

With the spotlight on and our role calling us to perform, we are truly at the centre of the moment.

It could be we operate on no fixed or specific stage. Accordingly, we are at the centre of the moment at all times as our work represents us on an ongoing basis.

If we are actually required to perform – like a duck in the pond – at only one location, there will be no confusion regarding where and when we are at the centre of the moment.

The answer is to be found in the location of yesterday’s endeavour as well as that of today. To understand where we will be at the centre of the moment tomorrow we need to wait until then, however.

Referring again to our duck in the pond, it finds itself at the centre of the moment captured in the photo for eternity. Whether it is happy to be there is not for us to say, yet it is probably better to have been shot with the camera than with a gun no doubt.

Moving away from such existential consideration, back to the centre of the moment, we might wish to keep in mind our performance lasts beyond the actual time on stage.

Those moments prior to starting, and indeed also those minutes afterwards as we remain in the vicinity of our work, represent time someone can be assessing us and so it is crucial we remain conscious of being at the centre of the moment also then.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Looking in

March 27, 2016

Cat looking in

With the job completed and the praise, silence or indeed criticism having stopped ringing in our ears, we might choose to take a few moments to spend looking in, reviewing for ourselves our performance.

Our personal assessment might focus on any number of elements making up our work. For now, let’s give attention to three general aspects of any task we are required to perform.

A) Looking in on our preparation
What aspects of the execution should have been better researched, rehearsed or prepared in some manner? To what extent are we satisfied we undertook this stage to the best of our ability, in spite of any pressure put on us to just ‘get the job done’?

B) Looking in on our attitude
Even if we feel competent in managing our emotions and being able to portray a professional manner regardless of how we actually feel, it is worthwhile to explore our attitude to our work. That we all get down or fed up from time to time is not the issue. Any long-term frustrations with what we are called upon to perform could lead us to go through the motions instead of applying our full self to the work. In a similar fashion, lingering doubts or concerns over time have the power to hold us back. Looking in on these items sooner rather than later, on the other hand, has the power to save us unnecessary pain in another moment.

C) Looking in on our execution
Setting aside the feedback from others, useful though it can be at times, we may assess for ourselves our efforts. In our heart we understand the level to which we performed compared to what we are capable of offering. Any discrepancies between the two deserve an examination to evaluate what might be done better the next time we are called upon to undertake a similar task.

Reflecting on these three aspects is probably not enough to fully do justice to our work. It might, however, be a start to the looking in process.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Preparation

September 10, 2015

Preparation

“Scratching beneath the surface on any successful endeavour invariably we find preparation is present.” #bgdtcoaching.

Leaving aside elements of chance and questions regarding destiny, preparation is that factor capable of making a difference to each and every one of our activities.

With preparation comes the possibility to test our work to ensure each aspect meets required standards before delivery. We get to feel comfortable with the objective, resolve potential tangles and generally refine the offering in line with what is expected from us.

Preparation is also that time ahead of a performance in which the material comes alive to us and we place it in the context of an overall project or assignment.

Without preparation we can, of course, try our hand at producing a winning effort. If we are lucky we will be successful, yet without preparation the probability of this is greatly reduced. Having time to engage in preparation, but deciding not to use it, is a choice we may also have.

Those on the receiving end of our eventual undertaking would surely not be happy to learn of our decision not to prepare. If the activity results in a poor delivery of our work, frustration will be even more marked.

Right now, rather than looking at preparation from a multitude of other perspectives, let me stop now.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reflections – Centre stage

May 5, 2012

Although the idea of standing in the spotlight might not be everyone’s cup of tea, few have the option of hiding in the wings as daily we’re called upon to perform our various roles. Whether we like it or not, centre stage is our expected position in the play called Life.

Regardless of our formal job status, being centre stage is about being ourselves at all times rather than merely rehearsing the part we would like to have. And this is so even if we may wish otherwise, especially when the drama of life tests our skills and resources.

Yet despite the worries and doubts – let’s call it stage fright – nobody else can be us, a stand-in cannot equal or outperform us as the central character, centre stage, of our life.

In those moments when things aren’t going as we’d like, the former NBA star Charles Barkley offers us something to ponder: “I know I am never as good or bad as one single performance.”

Thanks for being here today. If you’d like to contact me, I can be reached by e-mail, through my website, blog or via Twitter.

Thanks again and bye for now.

Brian.

http://www.bgdtcoaching.com/


Reflections – Spotlighting Spotlight

April 4, 2011

You may have noticed the recent presence of the name Spotlight on Performance and the link to its blog in the blogroll to the right.

By combining our passion for professional and personal development and love of the theatre, the objective of this venture by Rob Cameron (@robjcameron on Twitter) and myself is to help people perform at their full potential, knowing society benefits when individuals operate at their best.

Considering life from a wide perspective, daily each of us are figuratively on stage – in the spotlight – as we perform our tasks, chores and duties. Theatre represents the immediacy of performance; retakes are rare within the workplace, no second chances to make a good first impression.

Perhaps the words attributed to the legendary Bruce Lee sum it all up best: “To me, the function and duty of a quality human being is the sincere and honest development of one’s potential.”

Whether through co-active coaching, training, teaching, writing or the activities of Spotlight on Performance, professional and personal development remains at the heart of my work and fortunately, as the stage gets bigger, the opportunities for learning more myself increase.

Thanks for reading this today.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


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