20 leadership questions

August 14, 2014

20

“Asking 20 leadership questions of ourselves presupposes we will listen to the answers.” #bgdtcoaching.

20 leadership questions: an opportunity to ponder various issues without the stress of having to justify your answers to anyone but perhaps yourself.

01. To what extent are you following your heart right now?
02. What does your answer to question 01 tell you?
03. To date, what has been your biggest success, at work and elsewhere?
04. What else do you what to achieve in your personal/professional life?
05. What would you gain from reaching your desired objectives?
06. What steps have you already taken to reach your goals?
07. What steps have you been putting off taking?
08. Why?
09. What are you gaining from not taking these steps?
10. What is your greatest leadership strength?
11. And your weakest point?
12. How would it be if the items in questions 10 and 11 were reversed?
13. To what extent are the folk in your ‘circle of influence’ being themselves rather than copies of you?
14. If you were to stop all your activities, who would continue with them?
15. What does your answer to question 14 tell you?
16. How would you define fulfillment?
17. How fulfilled do you feel at present?
18. What more are you willing to do to expand your fulfillment by 10%?
19. What would change if you achieved this increase?
20. How willing are you to undertake the action noted in question 18?

Thanks for looking at these 20 leadership questions. If you feel it could be beneficial to discuss your answers during a coaching session via Skype, please get in touch.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

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Tomorrow’s yesterday

June 15, 2014

Futuristic building

“Appreciating tomorrow’s yesterday is a matter of embracing today.” #bgdtcoaching.

Work may be stressing. It can seem that we are constantly engaged in evaluating the completion of one project, whilst working on the current one at the same time as we are putting ideas into place for the next.

Indeed looking in the future, being busy with plans for this or that, striving to get ahead of ourselves is a game played by many of us from time to time. But let’s remember, tomorrow’s yesterday is just another name for today and it is now that we make the real difference to our future.

Though it is true we should also hold tomorrow’s tomorrow in sight, today is the moment to be productive, reflective or whatever else now requires from us. Activities undertaken without holding tomorrow’s yesterday in mind will rarely take us far and certainly not towards our objectives.

With a capacity to visualize the future, we might be able to work on strategies beneficial to ourselves and those around us. Indeed certain industries, such as fashion, architecture and design, bring creativity to the present as they produce items from the future for us today.

With museums celebrating the past, connecting with tomorrow’s yesterday is perhaps the best way possible for us to embrace the present. Or possibly not as time is relative to our perspective in many senses.

Please feel free to give your input on tomorrow’s yesterday by leaving a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


At our best

June 8, 2014

Best performance

“When we are performing at our best we are giving our all and nobody can ask more from us.” #bgdtcoaching.

Unleashing our potential, possibly after an appropriate period of preparation and practice, is a crucial element of performing at our best. We can shine in the light of our maximum effort.

Once the proverbial curtain has been raised we find ourselves on stage, facing an audience composing of whoever is before us. Engaging with any interlocutor whilst going about our business is indeed a form of performance, and one in which we might influence the success or otherwise of the outcome to the extent we are operating at our best.

Each moment of the day provides us with opportunities to either live it fully or let it pass us by as we wait for the next. However we choose to experience it though, we can be sure our performance in one way or another impacts on it.

Performing at our best then is possibly the top of the scale and anything less detracts from our being. Yet when we are performing at our best we are giving our all and nobody can ask more from us.

And even if our best is not enough, we can at least rest at the end of the day knowing we held nothing back. To share your thoughts on the issue of being at our best, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Fun at work

June 1, 2014

Funfair

Suggesting there can be fun at work is not particularly strange perhaps. After all, in an ideal world we would all be engaged in activities we enjoy and so fun at work follows naturally from this.

That said, for some the workplace is anything but enjoyable and the idea of fun at work could be an insult even to their struggles for civil employment rights.

Without entering into the debate concerning working practices, in this fun at work post let’s briefly examine a couple of elements each of us may possibly connect with.

Fun at work 1.

When we are fully focused on whatever we are doing, in the flow of the moment, fun at work takes on a wider significance. We are giving our all, being and doing our best and this becomes a definition of fun at work.

Fun at work 2.

Keeping our attention firmly on an objective, we might find satisfaction in the achievement of our tasks. Fun at work in these instances is related to the successful conclusion of the work rather than enjoyment obtained by undertaking it.

However we view the issue, tapping into fun at work is itself a mindset, one we can choose to embrace or not as appropriate.

But how do you feel about the question of fun at work? To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this fun at work post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Developing naturally

May 28, 2014

Naturally growing tree
“Intuition is an excellent guide to us developing naturally.” #bgdtcoaching.

Though we may not do it often, or possibly not often enough, time taken to tune into our intuition provides valuable input about where we are and how we are developing naturally.

The day could seem to be without opportunities to grow. Yet we are, either knowingly or subconsciously, picking up knowledge and developing naturally for the sake of applying our potential at work, and in life in general.

By listening to our intuition we use a form of our potential that knows our true nature and gives input so we might reach our heartfelt goals.

Rational thinking is wonderful for learning the basics of any subject. However, the strongest connection with new material seems to occur in an intuitive way. When this happens we are indeed developing naturally.

As ever, these thoughts are offered as points of reflection. To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Developing naturally’ post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Same old record

May 22, 2014

Old record

“As the same old record plays the same old song,

habits give us the habitual outcome.” #bgdtcoaching.

It is well known that to get a different result we need to play a new tune instead of the same old record. We all have the capacity to expand ourselves beyond the limits of our experience right now.

Enhancing our potential could be a case of noting our weaknesses and undertaking a specific programme of development to improve our skills. With the almost endless opportunities available to most of us nowadays, such an investment of time and effort is not impossible to us.

That said, we can often hear folk repeat the same old record regarding a lack of ………………………………………. (fill in the blank according to the excuse of the moment, be it a weak economy, limited time for personal and professional development, an inability to stick to a learning schedule, etc.).

The same old record gets aired so often, also as justification at national and international levels, that it is little wonder inertia, procrastination and a sense of helplessness trickles down to individuals.

Same old record or not if we choose to change the music to which we move.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Selective vision

February 27, 2014

Selective vision

It could be argued a selective vision can focus efforts or blind us to opportunities. Clarity of vision, on the other hand, is a product of the heart and resonates with our values.

Noting specific details of the moment suggests we are fully focused on the task before us. Discipline and concentration are key ingredients to such a selective vision.

Yet if we are looking for inspiration, a selective vision might indeed blind us to opportunities given the narrow perspective it offers us.

Being open to the moment and the insights available to us as we embrace it fully is something we have the choice to do, when we so choose. On the contrary, a selective vision is possibly the outlook we have of life as a result of all the experiences and input acquired to date.

We are in this sense seeing externally what we have absorbed internally. The picture may be positive in the opinion of some and negative in the thinking of others. To us though it represents the kaleidoscope of ourselves and attaching labels to it does nothing to enhance it further.

Or perhaps not. If you wish, please don’t hesitate to share your views on these reflections by leaving a comment below. In any case, thanks for reading this Selective vision post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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