Results arrive from actions, not wishes

February 13, 2019

Even if we don’t like it, results arrive from actions, not wishes. Certainly, planning and preparation have their parts in any successful endeavour, yet efforts bring accomplishments.

It can be argued we need to base eventual actions on wishes. And surely those felt in the heart will have particular significance to us. Few would deny this observation. But we still need to add input into the mix to reach goals so, yes, results arrive from actions, not wishes.

Looking at the issue from a different perspective, one related to the idea of collaboration, things begin to take on a new dimension. Within any workgroup or team, it is essential each person is not only clear about his or her role but also understands what is expected in terms of individual undertakings.

General indications or vague instructions are, at best, going to slow down the march toward shared objectives.

Clear communication coupled with a precise division of responsibilities goes a long way in assisting all to give their best in the manner most appropriate to bring about success. Once again, results arrive from results, not wishes.

To share your input concerning success, please leave a comment below. In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Results arrive from actions, not wishes’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Failing to do our work

February 10, 2019

Failing to do our work might trigger any number of reactions from those who rely on our output.

1) Failing to do our work can create fear and concern from folk who depend on our efforts to complete tasks in which they are involved.

2) Failing to do our work may initiate an overall decline in productivity, especially if resources need to be shifted around to compensate for our inactivity.

3) Failing to do our work could be the proverbial straw to break the camel’s back, providing the final excuse to have our position taken from us by those above us.

And so on and so on. However, failing to do our work is most likely something we never think about so I will leave you now as you continue with your daily routine.

If you’d like to explore the issue of commitments, tasks and duties as part of a coaching conversation, feel free to get in contact.

Thanks for reading this ‘Failing to do our work’ post today.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?

February 7, 2019

Whether we take the idea of ‘singing’ at face value or not, it is worth asking is it really our job to teach the world to sing?

All teachers, leaders, mentors and development agents have the responsibility to transmit knowledge to the best of their ability. Outside of the formal structure of the said roles, however, we enter a grey area.

As much as we might wish to help everyone, if we fail to consider carefully the enquiry ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ we risk to a) force learning on those who are not interested in having it and/or b) burn ourselves out attempting the thankless task.

On the other hand, when we are in a position to help, it is no bad thing to do all we can within our ability. In such circumstances, holding back from reaching out does not mean we are being cautious but rather cold-hearted.

Yet if we live by the intention to do all we can whenever possible, asking ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ becomes meaningless.

Regardless of where you stand on the ‘Is it really our job to teach the world to sing?’ issue, thanks for connecting here today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Are we attracting or repelling potential fans?

February 3, 2019

Regardless of our position on the benefits of building large followers on social media, we can consider our presence there and ask the question: are we attracting or repelling potential fans?

Each post, every message plus all our photo uploads tell a story and provide reasons for us to connect with creative and interesting people.

Are we attracting or repelling potential fans?’ may even be the starting point of a wider assessment as to our existence online. What is our goal for all our posts? Are we adding value to the mountain of information and knowledge already available to everyone or are we just creating more noise?

Attempting to please everybody is a thankless task and one surely without any immediate benefits. Thinking about the impact we are already experiencing through our current efforts puts the consideration ‘Are we attracting or repelling potential fans?’ in a more interesting perspective.

In a world in which superficiality seems to be dominating, by looking carefully at our online objectives we give ourselves the opportunity to select actions most likely to be useful to all parties.

If, or better when, authenticity underpins our presence we have a better chance of responding in the affirmative to the question ‘Are we attracting or repelling potential fans?’, asked by ourselves or others.

To explore the inquiry ‘Are we attracting or repelling potential fans?’ as part of a coaching conversation, please get in contact.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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The importance of making decisions today for tomorrow

January 31, 2019

The importance of making decisions today for tomorrow can be found to the extent our current situation is aligned with our heartfelt objectives.

We are living out the reality our previous decisions created and, in all likelihood, our future is going to be based on those made now for later.

Other factors will in all probability be crucial in assessing the impact related to the importance of making decisions today for tomorrow to take responsibility in the present for the future.

Letting things drift is, on the other hand, is an option available to us. We might prefer to wait and see how things turn out or merely just go with the flow. The importance of making decisions today for tomorrow in such moments takes a backseat as we amble along going here, visiting there and so forth.

However, in such instances, we should not be surprised when we discover we have made little progress in closing the distance between where we are and where we say we would like to be – literally or figuratively speaking.

To share your thoughts on the importance of making decisions today for tomorrow, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Balancing our actions against our results

January 27, 2019

“Go, go, go!”, “Keep on keeping on!” and so we strive, push and hammer away, often without balancing our actions against our results.

But being clear what the impact our actions are producing is also a valid approach. Balancing our actions against our results ensures we don’t end up at the wrong destination by investing time and effort inappropriately.

In our hearts, we know when it is time to quit an endeavour or, at least, alter our emphasis, for the sake of reaching our desired goals. Ignoring such input could be a foolhardy thing to do bringing any number of unnecessary stresses and challenges.

Yet there will be occasions balancing our actions against our results can only be accomplished after our input. In such instances, we have to accept this scenario as it is and trust we are moving in the right direction now and with subsequent efforts.

So, to conclude, perhaps we should each assess the extent we are balancing our actions against our results as part of our daily mindfulness practice. To evaluate your situation within the context of a coaching conversation, don’t hesitate to contact me.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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What our daily language says about us

January 24, 2019

Though sitting in a silent retreat can bring all sorts of benefits, it is likely we spend more time engaging with people so it is worth considering what our daily language says about us.

Thoughts, dreams and intentions come together as we speak to answer what our daily language says about us. Emotions are set free, ideas are transmitted and values put into words. That our words are completely under our control says something fundamental in itself.

What our daily language says about us in terms of our inner well-being is another point we may ponder. The sayings, preferred words and the like make up our habitual vocabulary. But to what extent are we offering default expressions and responses, unconsciously blurted out rather than mindfully selected answers?

To explore the issue about what our daily language says about us as part of a coaching conversation please get in contact.

In the meantime, thank you for reading this ‘What our daily language says about us’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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