Looking up beyond the immediate moment

November 22, 2018

Looking up to see umbrellas in the sky

Looking up beyond the immediate moment requires only a willingness to do it coupled with a few minutes of tranquillity away from the daily grind.

The concept of looking up beyond the immediate moment can be described by way of a real-life example.

The other day a client, let’s call her Mary, told me how pressured she was feeling. Her good work had been noted and her boss had hinted at a promotion in the near future. However, all she could think about was living up to the reputation she felt she had of ‘getting everything done yesterday’.

Mary was giving herself no space to appreciate where her meticulous attention to preparation and hard work had gotten her.

Looking up beyond the immediate moment allowed her to mentally move away from the stress of her desire to leave the current position with nothing outstanding for her successor.

Relaxing into the exercise, Mary understood how nobody was expecting an empty schedule from her. In reality, such a scenario would place untold pressure on her successor to start from scratch whilst attempting to combat the fact of not being ‘Ms Do Everything’.

Using her time to sow seeds for future business, on the contrary, would be a beneficial way to see out the remaining weeks and provide a fantastic field to be harvested by her eventual replacement.

As Mary found out, looking up beyond the immediate moment brings into view previously unseen perspectives and possibilities to ponder and maybe act upon.

To discover for yourself the impact of looking up beyond the immediate moment in the form of a complimentary coaching conversation, via Skype or Google+ hangout, please get in contact.

In the meantime, thanks for reading this ‘Looking up beyond the immediate moment’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Window on the world

March 13, 2016

Windows

No matter the definition we give our stage of work, our outlook provides a window on the world. We may hold a positive, negative or indeed neutral view of our environment and position within it.

The window of the world could on occasions be in need of a clean, especially if soiled by prejudices, fears or doubts. On the other hand, should it be the window on the world looks out on a fascinating scene, we might need to look away if we are too distracted.

A window on the world is, in a sense, a reflection of all we have experienced and accomplished to date. It is easy for each of us to forget the work we have undertaken to reach where we are. Ideally we are exactly where we want to be, or at least further along the path than say this time last year.

However, without judging ourselves against others or seeking excuses for any perceived lack of progress in our development to date, we get to start anew today from here. A window on the world is before us and what we do now will impact on what we see later, as well as where we see it from.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


This is it

July 6, 2014

Tree

“Older than yesterday, younger than tomorrow. ‘This is it‘, said the present to today”. Unknown author.

As much as we may wish otherwise, and regardless of how much we attempt to fight against reality, this is it in terms of life at present. Yes, it is a pretty dramatic statement, but then so is the alternative to life.

Living 100% right now is a way of bringing all our experiences – good and bad – to this present moment for the sake of being fully alive right now. We might find ourselves, as a result of past decisions, indecision or specific choice, where we don’t wish to be.

However, to get anywhere else we need to connect with now, understanding this is it and make changes in this instance in order to move forward. Hiding our head in the sand, hoping things will just change by themselves is also an option. Yet if we are truthful, how many times has it been a valid one for us in the past?

Accepting this is it is the starting point for any development we wish to engage in. Moving from here to there is only possible when we are clear about this present moment. By experiencing it as opposed to grasping onto it we acknowledge the moment.

This is it” we can say as it moves across our consciousness. And what we do right now will undoubtedly impact on the next moment and those after that.

Thanks for reading this. If you’d like to share your thoughts on the issue touched upon in this ‘This is it‘ post, please leave a comment below.

Best wishes.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Looking out

April 6, 2014

Looking out from a plane

Looking out beyond the immediate requires a pinch of imagination and a dash of open-mindedness.” #bgdtcoaching.

The idea of looking out, figuratively speaking if we are at the initial phase of a project, is very much a case of seeing what could be instead of fixating on what is. One aspect of our potential is the capacity to extrapolate its presence today into the future.

All things being equal, we can broadly trust the skills and competencies we have acquired until now to take us forward. Naturally we should be conscious of the need to remain updated in our chosen field of endeavour. That said, we can indeed engage in looking out beyond the present to see what might be.

And as we ponder the future our intuition will guide us to make decisions based on our strengths to help bring about the desired vision. Without a pinch of imagination and a dash of open-mindedness it is difficult to undertake this looking out exercise, yet when applied the rewards invariably outweigh the cost it may have obliged us to pay.

Looking up from the page, I can see it is time to conclude here. Please don’t hesitate to jump in with a comment about looking out if you so wish.

Thanks for reading this looking out post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Reflections – Perspectives

August 25, 2011

Our perspectives regarding the nature of things around us often alter as we move through life.

Sometimes our perspectives are distracted, even distorted, by seemingly urgent matters requiring our attention. In other moments our progress is steady and we can feel comfortable with our growth.

Our destination lies before us and how we choose to arrive will be influenced by our perspective not only of the setting itself – we can certainly connect with it on a number of levels such as the mental, the physical and the emotional – but also of the journey we will need to undertake for it to be reached.

For now, the perspective of travel is straightforward and the path likewise. That of tomorrow is another day, as ever.

Thanks for letting me offer a perspective here. If you’d like to contact me, I can be reached by e-mail, through my website, blog or via Twitter.

Thanks again and goodbye for now.

Brian.

 www.bgdtcoaching.com 


Reflections – Perspectives

March 10, 2011

We might have a calm perspective prior to an event, meeting or suchlike. With all the preparation completed, all we can do is wait for the kickoff.

And then before we know it, the occasion in question is over. Once it’s finished we may be left with any number of sensations. Choosing our perspective about the matter might depend on the extent to which we feel its execution or outcome has lived up to our expectations.

If much planning has been involved, there may also be some sadness over the fact this chapter has now ended. One perspective, which might provide some comfort as we reminisce, is offered in the words of Dr Seuss: “Don’t cry because it is over. Smile because it happened.”

From the perspective of change, we know any activity or situation rarely leaves us unmoved in some way. As such, by extracting the learning from the occasion we can appreciate another step has been taken along the road of life we’ve decided to follow.

However, a positive perspective might be frowned upon by those who believe negativity is reality and positivity is only wishful thinking. It’s a point of view and certainly it is not for me to judge the validity of anyone’s perspective; we all have our own reasons for believing anything.

Perhaps you have some thoughts on the issue of choosing one’s perspective towards events in your life. If you’d like to share your input here, please leave a comment below.

Thanks for reading this today.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


Reflections

July 19, 2010

What Can I Do Today For A Better Tomorrow?

Regardless of our employment status, this simple question used repeatedly can align us with the life we say we want, as we go about building our future in the present moment.

Fully employed raising a family
As the on-site CEO, logistics coordinator and the other million and one roles to be fulfilled each day, choices need to be made on an almost non-stop basis. Knowing why we are doing something and how it fits in with what we want for the future for ourselves, our loved ones and our communities can ensure the process of choosing is in line with ‘the big picture’.

Employed
Working for someone else is an exchange of competence and time for money. Listening to employees from a variety of organizations and sectors, it seems the exchange is rarely balanced. However, new opportunities are not always easy to predict. The approach of ‘waiting for the perfect situation in order to give one’s best’ might just be the reason why the ‘perfect situation’ hasn’t arisen yet. What can be done today for a better tomorrow, with the actual company or another one?

Self-employed
This category of worker is never unemployed, possibly underemployed but that’s another matter. The quieter moments, between projects or whilst in the process of building new business, is a time to prepare for tomorrow. When the phone starts ringing again it’s too late to review files, sort IT needs, learn new skills and catch up on sector studying. Using today, whether in terms of generating income or preparing for such times tomorrow, is the job of the self-employed.

Between Jobs
It is easy to feel despondent. Time can drag between the peaks of interviews and the troughs of waiting for their outcome. The question ‘What can I do today for a better tomorrow?’ might spur one on to finding all sorts of previously unseen opportunities. Perhaps the library can be visited to polish up technical skills. Resources on offer within the community may lead to new contacts, and so forth. Ongoing personal and professional development are not dependent on employment.

In each case, taking the proactive stance rather than the reactive, passive position might lead to an alignment with who we truly know we are. Control over our attitude towards life need not be given away to circumstances, external factors or other people.

So, what can you do today for a better tomorrow? I’d love to hear your answers, so feel free to leave a comment. In the meantime, thanks for reading this today.

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


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