What would happen if we used productively each and every moment?

September 24, 2020

Yes, yet another post pushing the idea of being conscious of how we use/spend/invest/squander time. Today, let’s explore what would happen if we used productively each and every moment.

Firstly, we might complete tasks in a few minutes which initially looked as if they would take forever. Focusing our effort on one item, instead of spreading it across several activities, gives us the chance to ‘complete things’ rather than just ‘shuffle them around’.

Secondly, by being productive, we are demonstrating respect for time, and this could send a message to those who may have hoped to offload their assignments on us. Understanding the value of our time, and scheduling our priorities, will ensure we use it well.

And this could then give us time to engage in events and interests away from the proverbial desk, knowing we have concluded our duties for the day.

Thanks for reading this ‘What would happen if we used productively each and every moment?‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM FCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate clients and individuals, mainly motivated young and mid-life professionals who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate course Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

In past semesters, he additionally taught the International graduate course Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and the Interfaculty postgraduate course Training through drama and coaching for work.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Completing one action today

May 5, 2019

Like it or not, completing one action today will make more impact on tomorrow than all the unfinished activities we are currently wrapped up in.

Results matter when focusing on productivity. Being busy being busy is a strategy for getting through the day but one unlikely to bring us closer to our main goal.

On the other hand, completing one action today indicates, at least to ourselves, our ability to prioritize time and energy for the sake of getting done what we have designated as crucial.

That said, the pressure to not engage in completing one action today can be tremendous. Being able to shut out distractions, resist getting caught up in office gossip and politics plus the multitude of notices arriving across our screens takes willpower.

Reminding ourselves why we want to achieve this or that, however, helps us as we go about completing one action today. Connecting with the desired outcome, as it were, might just be the inspiration we require right here, right now.

Regardless of how you view the issue of ‘Completing one action today’, thanks for reading this post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Waiting for tomorrow today

August 30, 2018

 

Taxis waiting in the street

We may not be consciously doing it, yet for many of us, we are waiting for tomorrow today in terms of putting off tasks, projects and the like.

The mindset of procrastination is prevalent throughout society. The urgency to ‘get things done’ has given way to a more casual approach. Possibly technology has taken away the validity of concentrating effort into the traditional nine-to-five workday.

‘Today’ stretches across time zones via social media giving little or no relevance to ‘now’. How many of us are engaged in cross-border conversations in which parties respond according to their own time references?

Gaps between messages are not considered rude as delays once were, even though we had less sophisticated communication links then. Nowadays productivity itself includes an element of waiting for tomorrow today in case situations alter, thus eliminating the need to do whatever was originally required.

On the other hand, there are still issues demanding immediate attention. Depending on the sector or nature of work, we are obliged to deal with certain items as soon as possible and absolutely without waiting for tomorrow today.

Getting the balance right between these two positions or mindsets is key to living in the modern world.

Instant replies are appreciated but less so when responses are clearly automated. Information is shared relentlessly yet time to understand its importance is rarely offered. Care and thought are valued although not when a simple ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ will suffice.

Anyway, with time moving on, let me conclude by thanking you for being here and for reading this ‘Waiting for tomorrow today’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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A walk in the park

June 10, 2018

Walking in the park

Why is Brian blogging about a walk in the park? A good question.

Actually, I am thinking about a walk in the park from the perspective of doing something to get us out into nature if we are not already there.

Spending much of my time either in a training room, a virtual coaching space online or shut up in my home-office writing blog posts, books and poetry, a walk in the park every now and then is not a bad thing.

In reality, I take an early morning run in the park most days during the warmer period of the year. For me, that usually means mid-April to mid or late September. Sorry, but getting up at five is not the problem it is the idea of going outside into the cold that stops me the rest of the year.

Anyway, for those days I am not outside to see the dawn, a walk in the park offers a positive alternative. ‘Getting some air’ and ‘Stretching the legs’ are valid reasons to make such an effort. Even when the To do list seems more urgent than a walk in the park, productivity increases after a few minutes of exercise.

With that said, I’m off for a walk in the park. See you there?

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How can we increase our effectiveness?

February 4, 2018

Swans effectively swimming in pond

 

Although giving our best is surely a hallmark of who we are, answering the question ‘How can we increase our effectiveness?’ might produce some interesting insights.

Whether managing better priorities at work, maximising free time, or keeping goals in mind as we undertake our daily routine, something more may be done.

How can we increase our effectiveness? Pondering this, we open ourselves to the idea of harnessing our resources of time, energy, and mental capacity. Taking responsibility for these elements is itself a positive approach to life.

And, if for any reason we have neglected this in the past, it now becomes a valid response to the inquiry ‘How can we increase our effectiveness?

To share your input on the issue of ‘How can we increase our effectiveness?’, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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