Appreciating silence associated with today

December 27, 2018

Silent street

Attempting to find a few minutes in order to engage in appreciating silence associated with today may not be easy, but it will surely be beneficial. These few days in between festivities are often viewed as crucial moments by those obliged or requested to work.

The relative inactivity of this time of the year gives us the opportunity to catch up, as it were, with all those tasks and chores usually left for now. We might be working but in a more relaxed manner than once the phones start ringing again. Appreciating silence associated with today is a gift worth embracing.

Appreciating silence associated with today is additionally an approach to give ourselves time to just be with where we are. This is, of course, the opposite of trying to be everywhere for everyone at the same time.

So, rather than fill this page with many more words, I will let you enjoy a spot of appreciating silence associated with today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Reflections

April 26, 2010

Meditating with Buddy

“When we take time to quiet ourselves, every human being can sense that our lives could be lived with greater compassion and greater wakefulness. To meditate is to support this inner potential and allow it to come forth into our lives.” These words by Jack Kornfield, from his book Meditation For Beginners, explain my activity last Sunday evening; meditating with a guided meditation on my mp3 player.

Nothing strange in that except for what happened after. On completing the exercise, I failed to stop the player and found myself, no pun intended, still in a meditative state with Buddy Holly singing Rave On in my ears. Rather than interrupt the performance I chose to just ‘be with’ the music and let the emotions, feelings and energy it was creating flow by me, as if I were outside the sensations.

The Clash followed with (White man) in Hammersmith Palais. Still I sat there as memories of the late 70s passed by. Billy Joel came and went with This Is The Time. The Kinks attempted to stir me with Waterloo Sunset and yet the calmness continued. My breathing was regular, for once my legs weren’t aching and even my curiosity around the stillness within the music wasn’t distracting me. It was only another thought drifting by like a leaf floating down the stream.

I was finally roused as the piece of music I use before each training session entered my head. Supertramps’s Give A Little Bit brought the sitting to an end. Somewhat taken aback by the exercise, I was nevertheless content not to have gotten up immediately after the guided meditation.

Giving ourselves moments of space to step back from the daily pace – or should that be race – of life is considered in many societies as a healthy practice. For me it is like taking off a heavy overcoat and enjoying the sense of lightness the action brings with it.

We each have our own methods of meditation, perhaps even without using that particular word. Some walk, others swim, jog or read. Maybe you prefer to be surrounded by nature. Yoga or T’ai chi might be for you. I’d love to hear what works for you in the area of well-being. Your input is always welcomed here.

Rave On!

Brian.
www.bgdtcoaching.com


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