Being less to be more

January 16, 2020

We are all busy, this is just part of life today. Nevertheless, attempting to be everything to everyone and refusing to admit ‘that one extra task’ we say ‘yes’ to may throw our schedule off track, place additional stress on our shoulders.

However, as we jump from one urgent item to another, our objectives fall further down our to-do list. Being less to be more, on the other hand, involves us turning down assignments and speaking up to utter a categorical ‘no’ when it is needed.

Yes, we will upset those people who are accustomed to dropping their problems on us. Refusing the role of Indispensable Jane or Joe takes practice, even if such a position is not in our job description. Being less to be more of who we are is uncomfortable initially, yet is an act of authenticity.

If exploring the issue of being less to be more as part of a coaching conversation sounds interesting, get in contact.

Right now, thanks for reading this ‘Being less to be more’ post and please don’t forget to like and share it.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Guarding our mind against daily attacks

January 12, 2020

We lock the door, take care of passwords and the like, but to what extent are we guarding our mind against daily attacks?

In precise words, these attacks could include:

a) Toxic opinions spouted out by people around us;

b) Negative news stories reported endlessly on television and across social media;

c) Belittling thoughts inside our head, possibly telling us we are not good enough.

In terms of managing our time, guarding our mind against daily attacks coming from distractions, non-strategic activities and unfair requests on our schedule is a crucial task for us to undertake.

And once we have the habit of guarding our mind against daily attacks, our days, at least, take on a shape more aligned to our objectives. Although there will still be moments in which we have no choice but to do this or that for others, in these instances we know they are the exceptions, not the rule.

In all probabilities, you have winning strategies for dealing with these attacks. Accordingly, if you would like to share them, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

Thanks for connecting here today and please feel free to like and share this ‘Guarding our mind against daily attacks’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Università Cattolica, Milan, Italy, Brian teaches the International graduate courses Leadership coaching: bringing potential to the stage of work and Personal marketing: performance skills at work.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing motivated people who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

Curious? You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Heart Poems On Time. The NEW book

June 12, 2018

Sands of time

Heart Poems On Time

“That time passes is a given. That we use it well is a choice.” Brian Groves.

With the Heart Poems series now well established and appreciating the extent to which time impacts on how we live each day, a collection of poems around this crucial theme is surely not out of place.

In a similar way to enthusiasm and energy, time available today may not be there for us tomorrow. It cannot be ‘stored up’ for another moment. We either make use of it now or lose it forever.

Nevertheless, it is easy to believe we have all the time in the world to reach our goals.

Accordingly, this book is aimed at helping you remember this is the moment for you to be you, live your potential and embrace life as it is, right here and right now.

With attention focused on the now, we are able to manage items previously having the power to distract us from our priorities. Moreover, fears about tomorrow and concerns hanging around from yesterday have little impact on us as we go about embracing today.

With this book, you will get the opportunity to:
a) Explore your perspective of today;
b) Ponder the extent you are living the moment;
c) Apply any new thinking in your life.

I hope this book becomes a catalyst for further reflection and input for you to manage not only today but also tomorrow.

Though I am experienced in the field of professional and personal development, you are the expert on your life. Implementation of any changes will, of course, need to be undertaken by you, I cannot do it for you.

With that said, enjoy!

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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How much time do we save by being always available?

November 12, 2017

Man diving to save time

 

Being the ‘Go to’ person is perhaps satisfying and tiring in equal measures on many levels, yet thinking about the bigger picture, how much time do we save by being always available?

It could be we are experts at managing seemingly burdensome workloads in line with the many commitments we have taken on board. ‘How much time do we save by being always available?’ in this case would not be a relevant question as we are constantly busy with no free moments on any given day.

From an opposite perspective, answering “Little or none” to the ‘How much time do we save by being always available?’ inquiry suggests we are not coping well with endless demands and ridiculous deadlines. Our own objectives most probably rarely get a look in during the rush to make possible the impossible.

Why we put ourselves in the position of being always available is worth considering in a post dedicated specifically to this point. For now, we can place the issue in our in-tray for another day.

Thanks for your presence here today despite the many others things you might have to complete. If you would like to do so, please feel free to join the conversation about ‘How much time do we save by being always available?’ by leaving a comment below.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer, Adjunct Professor and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to reach their full potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Why start today instead of tomorrow: three reasons

April 6, 2017

Three railway lines

 

The question “Why start today instead of tomorrow?” cropped up recently in a discussion with a group of participants in a workshop focused on, yes, time management.

The three reasons which resonated with the people in the room with regard to ‘why start today instead of tomorrow?‘, were as follows:

Reason 1.

Enthusiasm, energy and time available today may not be there for us tomorrow. They are items which cannot be ‘stored up’ for another moment. We either make use of them now or lose them forever relative to their coming together in the exact same combination linked to circumstances, events, and the like.

Reason 2.

Most projects, interactions, or even single actions, benefit from getting started as soon as possible. Once the initial input is undertaken, we give ourselves the chance to amend our efforts in light of how the task develops. If necessary, we are able to use our first effort as a base for subsequent endeavours.

Reason 3.

The impact we create by ‘getting going today’ could be crucial to our success tomorrow. In many instances, momentum will be the deciding factor between ‘reaching the finishing line successfully’ and ‘getting lost along the wayside’. This alone is perhaps enough to spur us into action immediately.

So, three reasons in answer to the “Why start today instead of tomorrow?” question. Naturally, there are probably many more reasons.

To share your thoughts on this ‘Why start today instead of tomorrow?‘ issue, please leave a comment below.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained Co-Active Coach and Freelance Trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

More Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

Heart Poems Captured From Dreams (2017)

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Is time running from us?

January 26, 2017

Watches

 

With twenty-four hours in today and most likely forty-eight hours worth of things to do by tomorrow, we could be forgiven for asking ourselves; “Is time running from us?

Looking at where the time has gone may be a valid investment of a few minutes, yet invariably we already know how we have spent the day so far.

Oftentimes it is by tapping into others’ expectations and agenda we find ourselves with a sinking feeling when we enquire “Is time running from us?

Attempting to be everything for everyone and trying to fulfil every call on our time rarely produces success.

Working according to thought-out priorities is a way of ensuring the answer to the question “Is time running from us?” is a resounding “No!

The unexpected is surely to be expected, however. Even so, by living fully each moment we are in our way making sure time isn’t running from us.

And by focusing on key objectives we get the chance to live our potential, as opposed to merely exist as if on autopilot.

If you’d like to explore the issue of how you use time to achieve your objectives, please get in contact and we can arrange a complimentary coaching call via Skype or Google+ hangout.

For now, thanks for reading ‘Is time running from us?‘ today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Keeping watch

November 27, 2016

 

Cat keeping watch

 

Keeping watch proactively could imply a form of action uniting an attentive ‘being’ with a static ‘doing’.

Being vigilant, keeping watch on how we invest our now is a key aspect of developing ourselves. That said, for many people the way their days are filled is left at best to the whims of others and at worst to the agenda of those attempting to manipulate them.

Underlining the value of each day, within the framework of our main objective, provides us with a structure as we go about keeping watch on our efforts towards our goals. On occasions we will need to be flexible, but perhaps not to the point of answering ‘Yes’ to every call on our time.

It is feasible some folk become offended by our supposed lack of availability. Unless our work is to be at their full disposition, however, there is no realistic reason why we should be made to feel guilty.

Paraphrasing from a book title by Primo Levi, “If not us, who?” Nobody else is likely to undertake the effort needed to achieve our goals and, even if we are carefully keeping watch, there are only twenty-four hours in the day.

Appreciating the activity requires our full presence coupled with a stillness of the moment, to close, let me just be bold and ask to what degree are you keeping watch on your efforts today?

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)


Waiting for

February 25, 2016

Taxi waiting for a client

Sitting around, waiting for our cue to set the act in motion, can be a tiring occupation in itself. Time moves at a snail’s march, it sometimes seems, as we hang around in attendance for the next opportunity to put our preparation into practice.

Regardless of our role, most jobs have elements of downtime interspersed with periods of intense activity. What we do whilst waiting for our next moment ‘of glory’ might be significant. Some may choose to merely sit around, kick their heels and chew the proverbial cud with colleagues.

Others possibly prefer to profit from the free time by either investing in ongoing learning or, if away from the workplace, undertaking leisure pursuits. In terms of using the moments we are waiting for this or that, options are only really limited to our imagination.

Waiting for something to happen could be what you have been engaging in as you read this post. In any case, let me thank you for connecting here today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Too many items

February 4, 2016

Many items in a shop

Too many items may seem to be a phrase expressing a judgement on this or that. In actual fact it could just be an observation of what is for us, right now, in front of us. Certain objects might seem unnecessary elements cluttering the surroundings. And possibly they are.

Too many items at times represent the habit of indulging the urge to acquire more, often without thought to the eventual added value the pieces concerned offer us. By taking a step back and evaluating the question of ‘too many items‘ we are taking responsibility for our environment.

Letting go of this, keeping that, freeing ourselves from that and appreciating this anew, are things we have the power to do. And from the exercise clarity has the opportunity to emerge. Too many items can just turn out to be a fair assessment, or then again perhaps not. It is for us to discover.

Looking at the issue from a wider picture, to what extent are we loading our agenda with too many items? What are we gaining from attempting to undertake everything? How successful have we been with this strategy to date?

The honest answers to these questions are found in our heart and made evident through our relationship with the agenda. The feelings we have with what we have to do, or at least have accepted to do, speak loudly about whether we have too many items on our plate or not.

Thanks for reading this ‘Too many items‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


Overwhelmed

November 19, 2015

Field overwhelmed with rain

Feeling overwhelmed, by perhaps so many things to do, could be a sensation known to each of us I suspect. Looking at the agenda, or even the pile of items on our desk requiring our attention, has the power to make even the best of us cringe from time to time.

That the sense of being overwhelmed is rarely permanent suggests we are able to manage most days without great difficulties. Problems begin with the arrival of unexpected assignments, often handed to us at the last minute and with absurd deadlines attached to them.

There will be occasions we can refuse to get involved with activities not strictly related to our priorities. Yet a refusal is not always an option. In such situations, no matter how overwhelmed we may think we are, energy has to be found to deal with the latest task placed on our shoulders.

In a way our past success at coping with ridiculous requests has given out the message we are people who have the ability to ‘get the job done’. Nobody, it seems, cares to know if we are overwhelmed or not. As such and once again, we just have to get on with getting it all done…

Thanks for taking the time out from a probably busy schedule to read this ‘Overwhelmed‘ post today.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


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