Are economics or values guiding your actions?

March 3, 2019

Are economics or values guiding your actions? Before we dig into this question, let’s look at what we mean by economics and values.

Loosely speaking, economics could be any intention or action associated with gaining monetary benefit. ‘Give to get back’, ‘Offer this or that as a loss leader with the aim of obtaining a return later on’, and so forth.

Even without referring to Gordon Gekko’s ‘Greed is good’ philosophy, the importance of money is clear to us all in our consumer-driven world.

Values, on the other hand, represent our personal approach to life. Though we may not always follow their input, their presence in our heart is always perceived.

So, are economics or values guiding your actions? Are you in it ‘just for the money’ or is there something else moving you forward?

We live life on our own terms and, in essence, there is no right or wrong answer to the question ‘Are economics or values guiding your actions?

Sometimes, however, it is good to talk through such enquiries. To schedule a coaching conversation, just get in contact.

For now, thanks for connecting here today to read this ‘Are economics or values guiding your actions?’ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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Living out our values

January 10, 2019

When it comes to it, we are either living out our values or we are not. There is no middle ground for this issue.

Living out our values means being authentic to our ideals and putting action into our words.

Not living out our values, on the contrary, implies we are merely ‘going through the motions’ without giving our all to the question before us.

Priorities are made evident by the attention we give them and, more importantly, the time we set aside for bringing them into being. And once we are actually living out our values, creating the life we had hoped for, we are being true to ourselves and to those with whom we engage.

Additional steps may well be necessary to ensure we are constantly living out our values in the likely event of us having to face challenges and setbacks, but that is material for a follow-up post.

For now, thanks for taking the time to connect here and read this ‘Living out our values’ post.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches an International graduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related leadership and performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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To what extent is the brand You iconic?

October 14, 2018

Iconic red postbox

For the sake of this post, let’s accept the idea that each of us is a brand, hence the question to what extent is the brand You iconic?

Wherever we choose to look, we are surrounded by images and brands, all attempting to capture our attention and, directly or indirectly, our money. That said, the brand You is associated with much more than the transmission of a message, a storytelling vehicle or other such marketing tool.

Encapsulating your values and reflecting your outlook on life, the brand You is literally you with a capital Y. But again, to what extent is the brand Y iconic? Amongst family, friends, colleagues and acquaintances you are surely a leading light, the ‘Go to’ person.

How can I put forward such an idea? Because we all are to those we interact with, whether we realize it or not.

Attracting iconic status implies your impact extends beyond the immediate ‘circle of influence’ to reach a wider audience. Some time ago I read a thought-provoking tweet, the source, unfortunately, escapes me. “If your last tweet were the message on your tombstone, how would you be remembered?”

Brand You becomes iconic also through each social media post, hopefully, the latest one is not your last one all the same.

As I close here, let me leave you with the initial opening question for you to ponder: “To what extent is the brand You iconic?

Kindest regards.

Brian.

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, Coach, Trainer and Author, supplies professional and personal development to a portfolio of corporate and individual clients.

As an Adjunct Professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian taught a postgraduate course, using four characters taken from dramatic texts as coaching clients, to examine various work-related performance matters.

Brian’s goal is to support through coaching, training and writing all who wish to live their potential, in education, work or life in general.

You can contact Brian via e-mail (brian@bgdtcoaching.com), by clicking on the icons or leaving a comment below.

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The grit in integrity

March 6, 2016

Flint wall

Without question, we can all identify with the grit in integrity. It is that element capable of powering us over obstacles, energizing us in moments of difficulty and pushing us across chasms of doubt. It is a hard edge, though possibly wrapped in kindness towards our true self and others.

Yet what exactly is the grit in integrity? Perhaps it relates to the steely determination to reach goals no matter what. It could be connected to a deep motivation we hold within us to prove something to either ourselves or someone important to us.

There may be anger or pain, passion and belief at the heart of the grit in integrity. As ever, we all know our own reasoning for wanting to achieve anything. Many times it is not necessary to put into words the source of our strength.

Having the grit in integrity is most likely enough, without resorting to definitions or such like. Thinking about integrity, it might be a valid exercise to reflect on the impact it has on our daily encounters.

Being true to our values, ‘walking our talk’ to use a cliché, is a way of living with integrity. Those around are able to rely on us. We keep our word, do what we say we will do and, although surely we are not perfect, we strive to be our best in all we do.

Thanks for reading this ‘The grit in integrity‘ post.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

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About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Performance skills at work (2015), Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).

 


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