How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work

November 24, 2016

Ebook info

 

 

You are perfect as you are. However, over the course of a typical workday it is easy to forget this under the stress of meeting the needs of clients, colleagues and other stakeholders. Rather than attempting to fix you, How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work was written with the aim of sharing everyday coaching tips to help you as you go about giving your best, regardless of what the task involves or where it occurs.

Divided into bite-sized chunks, How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work brings together ideas associated with the stage for the sake of ensuring your potential is the star of the show on a daily basis. As with any assignment, the delivery of your potential represents more than what is experienced by the audience or beneficiary of your work.

What is visible once the proverbial curtain has been raised is the fruit of much effort, consisting of initial assessments, detailed preparation and precise practice, geared to offering your best possible performance. And then being able to repeat this as necessary.

From the preparatory phase of any project, to the feedback and learning opportunities deriving from post-performance reflection, the giving of your best is achieved not by luck, but through a systematic use of tried, tested and learnable skills.

Beginning with an exploration of the roles you are expected to undertake as part of your job description, to an examination of what is needed to ensure your presence ‘on stage’ represents the true you, these and other aspects of your daily performance are covered in the opening chapters.

Input concerning preparation for the delivering of your potential is then dealt with, leading to the moment of execution. To complete How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work, key points regarding the learning available post-performance in the form of feedback – uplifting when full of praise and useful if critical – are set out in the concluding chapter.

Throughout How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work questions are asked. Accordingly, it is advisable to read this self-help book with a notebook and pen or pencil to hand to capture reflections, thoughts and answers.

Similar to any form of professional and personal development material, the value of How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work is found in its adaptation and application to your specific needs on your stage of work.

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work is available now at the Amazon Kindle Store.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Google+: google.com/+BrianGroves
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
Amazon: amazon.com/author/briangroves
Blog: https://bgdtcoaching.wordpress.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/BrianGroves
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/today/author/bgdtcoaching
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer, CTI-trained co-active coach and freelance trainer, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

How to deliver your potential successfully on the stage of work (2016)

The stage of work (2016)

Performance skills at work (2015)

Personal performance potential at work (2014)

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013)

Reflections on performance at work (2012)

Elements of theatre at work (2010)

Training through drama for work (2009)

Advertisements

Leadership

December 31, 2014

Leadership seagull

Leadership is only a lonely role if we fail to inspire others to join us on the journey to success.” #bgdtcoaching.

Many books have been written regarding leadership and success. Three of my favourites are: The Leader’s Way by His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Laurens Van Den Muyzenberg, Winning! by Clive Woodward and Focus: the hidden driver of excellence by Daniel Goleman.

That said, leadership can be viewed from numerous other perspectives, so right now let’s look at three of these.

– Leading from the front

This is a form of leadership in which our actions inspire and encourage others to give their best. Such leading by example is, of course, contrary to the old idea that maybe had as its motto “Do as I say, not as I do”.

– Leading from the back

This, in the sense referred to here, relates to the notion of empowering others to be themselves in order to achieve shared objectives. We may guide them, yet the actions are theirs. This hands-off approach to leadership functions to the extent we are able to step away from wanting to control everything and trust others to get things done successfully using their skills and abilities.

– Leading as we would like to be led

This kind of leadership is a heartfelt strategy, one with the potential to produce extraordinary results for all. If a situation is to our liking why not extend it to others? From the other side of the coin, why should we impose a type of behaviour on others we ourselves find unacceptable?

Three leadership strategies, hopefully giving us something to think about as we end this year.

Thanks for connecting here today and Happy 2015.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Communication

December 21, 2014

Shoes

Communication from the heart transmits more than mere words can ever do.” #bgdtcoaching.

Communication is something we are all engaged in continuously. Indeed many activities are no longer even considered as communication, just part of daily life: updating Facebook, tweeting, texting and so forth. Additionally we can consider the messages transmitted by our actions, choice of clothes and friends and the like as important forms of communication.

From a work perspective, communication is essential to the smooth and successful running of any enterprise, impacting on workplace performance.

Stakeholders need to be kept informed, ideally in a timely manner, of events and issues impacting the organization. And being part of a communication network is itself a way of strengthening relationships among interested parties.

We all like to know what is going on and if we are to be in a position to do our best, give our all, communication is a prerequisite to this. And it is always worth remembering communication from the heart transmits more than mere words can ever do.

For now, thank you for connecting here. To join the conversation on the subject of communication, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype
Twitter: @bgdtcoaching
E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com
Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Personal performance potential at work (2014), Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


At our best

June 8, 2014

Best performance

“When we are performing at our best we are giving our all and nobody can ask more from us.” #bgdtcoaching.

Unleashing our potential, possibly after an appropriate period of preparation and practice, is a crucial element of performing at our best. We can shine in the light of our maximum effort.

Once the proverbial curtain has been raised we find ourselves on stage, facing an audience composing of whoever is before us. Engaging with any interlocutor whilst going about our business is indeed a form of performance, and one in which we might influence the success or otherwise of the outcome to the extent we are operating at our best.

Each moment of the day provides us with opportunities to either live it fully or let it pass us by as we wait for the next. However we choose to experience it though, we can be sure our performance in one way or another impacts on it.

Performing at our best then is possibly the top of the scale and anything less detracts from our being. Yet when we are performing at our best we are giving our all and nobody can ask more from us.

And even if our best is not enough, we can at least rest at the end of the day knowing we held nothing back. To share your thoughts on the issue of being at our best, please leave a comment below.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Bring it about

June 5, 2014

Performer

Bring it about, make it happen!” #bgdtcoaching.

Few besides ourselves generally recall the hours of practice undertaken and the sacrifices made along the path to reaching this moment. Yet that effort exerted at the preparatory stage is wasted unless we are able to bring it about at the desired time in the workplace.

We may have chosen our goal long ago, and lifestyle and professional choices made to date could have long slipped into our way of being. For others the actual situation might be relatively new, a role perhaps thrust onto them by a change in circumstances or so forth.

Whatever the reality, each of us needs to bring it about for the sake of doing what we have to do, performing as best as we know how either individually or as part of a team. However, as we go about our various endeavours surprising opportunities to showcase our talents can arise.

We bring it about by being ourselves, committed to the tasks before us and available to embrace learning, also from eventual mistakes, for the sake of developing personally and professionally.

Thanks for connecting to this bring it about post.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Fun at work

June 1, 2014

Funfair

Suggesting there can be fun at work is not particularly strange perhaps. After all, in an ideal world we would all be engaged in activities we enjoy and so fun at work follows naturally from this.

That said, for some the workplace is anything but enjoyable and the idea of fun at work could be an insult even to their struggles for civil employment rights.

Without entering into the debate concerning working practices, in this fun at work post let’s briefly examine a couple of elements each of us may possibly connect with.

Fun at work 1.

When we are fully focused on whatever we are doing, in the flow of the moment, fun at work takes on a wider significance. We are giving our all, being and doing our best and this becomes a definition of fun at work.

Fun at work 2.

Keeping our attention firmly on an objective, we might find satisfaction in the achievement of our tasks. Fun at work in these instances is related to the successful conclusion of the work rather than enjoyment obtained by undertaking it.

However we view the issue, tapping into fun at work is itself a mindset, one we can choose to embrace or not as appropriate.

But how do you feel about the question of fun at work? To join the conversation here, please leave a comment below. For now, thanks for reading this fun at work post today.

Kindest regards.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


Enjoyment

November 27, 2013

Notice on a board

“The enjoyment of life is enhanced by active participation.” #bgdtcoaching.

Without enjoyment work may be accomplished all the same and day will still turn to night, yet we can be left with an empty feeling inside of ourselves. Although not suggesting we should be in a state of raucous laughter all the time, enjoyment regarding how we spend our time, and time after all makes up our life, is important.

The perceived level of involvement in a task undoubtedly increases when we are enjoying ourselves even if the matter in question is challenging. Yet if the scales tip against enjoyment, we should perhaps either find ways to make our endeavours more pleasurable or take steps to change our situation.

For some folk enjoyment is reserved for completing matters and they might like nothing more than reaching the end of what they have started. Others may find enjoyment in testing times as they face opportunities to apply their learning and the like.

I really appreciate your presence here and, regardless of how you spend your time today, hope enjoyment will be present. To offer your thoughts on the issue of enjoyment, please leave a comment below.

Thanks again.

Brian.

Skype: bgdtskype

Twitter: @bgdtcoaching

E-mail: brian@bgdtcoaching.com

Website: http://www.bgdtcoaching.com

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/bgdtcoaching/videos

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/bgdtcoaching/the-bgdtcoaching-space

About Brian

Brian Groves DipM MCIM Chartered Marketer and CTI-trained co-active coach, supplies professional and personal development through coaching, coaching workshops, marketing development training and English language training.

As an adjunct professor at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy, Brian teaches a postgraduate course based on dramatic texts and elements of coaching to examine various work-related performance matters.

Publications

Coaching, performing and thinking at work (2013), Reflections on performance at work (2012), Elements of theatre at work (2010) and Training through drama for work (2009).


%d bloggers like this: